Category Archives: Heritage

Town Belt Traverse 2017

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Filed under Democracy, Dunedin, Education, Events, Fun, Geography, Health, Heritage, Inspiration, Leading edge, Name, New Zealand, People, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Sport, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design

Who needs cheap-brained tourists —ugh #Dunedin

I tried taking the usual bad ‘visitor’ happysnaps

but seriously (no tourists were shoved aside to take these)

Destination Dunedin managing the trade-offs between risk and innovation….

*Enterprise Dunedin, hope you’ve got a section or three about that in your destination plan

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On Monday I was quickly(!) photographing post-iD architectural details inside Dunedin Railway Station – it was absolutely no more than 3 minutes by smartphone – when an Asian tourist abruptly told me to get out of the way so her male partner could get a shot. Moi ? I was there first, just walking and clicking – there was no crowd – the visitor arrogance was slightly disgusting.

It could happen anywhere. People sheeple.

The following at ODT, however, is much much worse.
Quite frankly the residents of Baldwin St should seek police and legal action.
It’s YOUR homes, YOUR property, YOUR privacy that’s being abused.
The council can help. The ED can help.

[A steep street of No Trespass notices and snarling bullmastiffs has its own photographic charm.]

Good on Sharon Hyndman for speaking out.
I wouldn’t be in her shoes, for all ‘the world’.

At Facebook:

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### ODT Online Wed, 29 Mar 2017
Privacy breaches upset resident
By David Loughrey
A sharp rise in visitor numbers to the world’s steepest street has resulted in one Dunedin resident speaking out about tourists she says are walking on to her property and peering in the windows. Baldwin St resident of 17 years Sharon Hyndman took her cause to a Dunedin City Council public forum yesterday. She said some tourists had “issues with the concept of privacy and private property”. That meant she had people walking down her drive, on to her deck, and peering in her windows, once or twice a week …. Others parked in her driveway, and did “not always co-operate” when asked to leave. One man had even entered her property and stood on an outdoor table to take a photograph.
Read more

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6.1.17 OPINIONS : Otago Southland regional tourism

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: pinimg.com – bullmastiff tweaked by whatifdunedin

5 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Geography, Health & Safety, Heritage, Hot air, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Perversion, Police, Politics, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, Urban design, What stadium

iD Dunedin Fashion runway events

Otago Polytechnic Published on Mar 23, 2017
2017 iD International Emerging Designer Awards
Otago Polytechnic is proud to be a sponsor of the iD Dunedin Fashion Week. One of our favourite events is, of course, the iD International Emerging Designer Awards. In this coveted competition, students from Otago Polytechnic compete against others from around the world – this year there are 33 finalists. It’s Australasia’s largest emerging fashion design competition, and this year it’s at Dunedin’s historic railway station. For more info about studying fashion at Otago Polytechnic, rated in the world’s top 50 fashion schools, check out http://www.op.ac.nz/fashion

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At Twitter:

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ID Dunedin Fashion
March 23, 2017

Australian Finalist takes out 13th iD International Emerging Designers Awards
A stand-out Australian emerging designer collection that reinvents archetypal garments including the biker jacket and blazer has won tonight’s 13th annual iD International Emerging Designer Awards held at the Dunedin Railway Station in New Zealand. Australian-based Nehma Vitols from Sydney’s University of Technology tonight took out the H&J Smith $6,000 First Place prize with her collection, ‘XXX’ – described by judges as “inspired”, merging new fabric technology with handcraft while deconstructing familiar silhouettes in an entirely unique way. Paper, silk and cotton merge to form hybrid materials that oscillate between two and three dimensions and between garment and sculpture. During Vitol’s fashion education, the former student from the University of Technology, Sydney, was selected to participate in the Woolmark Global Studio Program in China and the Textile Print Global Studio in Pukshar, India. Alongside her Bachelor of Design, she completed a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies.
The judging panel made up of Tania Carlson, NOM*d’s Margi Robertson, Marc Moore from Stolen Girlfriends Club, Australian fashion editor Georgina Safe, and iD’s international guest for 2017 Paulo Melim Andersson say the standard of finalists at this year’s event was very high. An overriding focus of the designers was on the ocean with aquatic inspired collections and a renewed focus on sustainability. Says Andersson: “All of the collections are a result of research and a commitment to new ideas. There was little evidence of international referencing and instead each finalist created their own vision in a collection that was fresh, unique and original.”
Hosted by ZM’s PJ Harding and Jase Hawkins, 29 international emerging designer collections showed at [last] night’s 13th annual event, supported by Otago Polytechnic.

This year’s winners are:
● The H&J Smith First Prize ($6000) Nehma Vitols, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
● Laffare Second Place ($4000): Lila John, University of Applied Arts, Vienna, Austria
● Gallery De Novo 3rd Place ($2000): Paul Castro, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia
● The Fabric Store Award for Excellence in Design worth $3000 (includes $2000 fabric): Tess Norquay, Massey University, Wellington, NZ
● Dunedin’s Golden Centre Mall Most Commercial Collection Prize ($1000): Talia Jimenez University of Technology Sydney, Australia
● The NZME and Viva Editorial Prize (awarded to best NZ collection): Megan Stewart, Massey University, Wellington, NZ.
● The Emilia Wickstead Internship: Emily Cameron, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia.

Backstage, Dr Margo Barton from the Otago Polytechnic School of Design and a team of students was in charge of managing the Awards, while Dunedin-based salon Klone Hair, led by Danelle and Karl Radel, took charge of the runway hair creations. Makeup looks for the models, supplied by Aart Model Management and 10 international models from the University of Shanghai Engineering Science, were created by the Revlon sponsored makeup team, led by Christal Allpress.
iD Dunedin Fashion Week is supported by the Dunedin City Council. iD Link

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At Facebook:

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Talented Swedish designer Paulo Melim Andersson is the International Guest Judge for this month’s iD Dunedin Emerging Designer Awards on 23 March. Andersson has designed for top European fashion houses Chloé, Marni Margiela and Zadig & Voltaire during his fashion career and he will show a retrospective collection at the iD Dunedin Fashion Shows at the Dunedin Railway Station on 24 & 25 March. Read more

Paulo Melim Andersson – Chloé 2007 [via fashionnz.co.nz]

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C U R R E N T ● E X H I B I T I O N

17-30 March – MUSE at Gallery De Novo, Stuart St, Dunedin
Dunedin artist Suzy Platt’s fashion illustrations are on show at Gallery De Novo in her new exhibition ‘Muse’. Suzy’s paintings recently caught the attention of renowned British photographer Nick Knight who asked her to illustrate the Haute Couture collections at Paris Fashion Week. The illustrations can also be viewed in London at the SHOWstudio Gallery.

At Facebook:

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5.3.17 iD Dunedin Fashion Week 2017 [includes videos]

Posted by Elizbeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Coolness, Design, Dunedin, Events, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Leading edge, Media, Name, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Pet projects, Public interest, Tourism

DCC Proposed Reserves and Beaches Bylaw : Real-deal submission

[click to enlarge]

Dunedin City Council
Current consultations: Proposed Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017

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Received from JimmyJones
Sat, 17 Mar 2017 at 10:03 p.m.

Subject: RE: Reserves and beaches consultation failure

Message: Find attached an outstanding submission on the horse-hating bylaw. I am sure there were many good subs, but I noticed this one from an 11-year-old who has a horse called Tonka. She makes a very good case for freedom. Like many of the other submitters, she bypassed the professionally organised DCC misinformation and understood that the DCC are threatening a total ban on horses on beaches.

I think other people should see it, I have removed her name from the submission in case she wasn’t expecting widespread publicity.

The submitters tell us that no other Council has a ban on horse riding on beaches in New Zealand.

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8.2.17 Hands Off Enjoyment of OUR Beaches #DCC

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

14 Comments

Filed under Adventure sport, Business, Corruption, DCC, DCC Bylaws, Democracy, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Events, Geography, Health, Health & Safety, Heritage, New Zealand, ORC, People, Perversion, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Public interest, Resource management, Sport, Tourism, Transportation, Travesty, What stadium

JimmyJones deflates *mad utterings* of Prof Emer Jim Flynn

Received from JimmyJones
2017/03/17 at 7:43 pm

Prof Flynn, Emeritus Professor in Politics, deserves much criticism for his use of fake facts to support his presentation to the DCC councillors on Monday. He is said to have a good understanding of scientific methodology and so he should have known better than to use spindoctored, hyper-exaggerated data. Perhaps it was deliberate. Remember that he is a red-to-the-core Lefty, having been an initiating member of the New Labour Party and the Alliance Party. He was an Alliance electoral candidate for a few elections and was #4 on the Alliance list near the end. Here is what he got wrong:

● the sea level at Dunedin isn’t the ludicrous 10mm/year, it’s not the fake 3.5mm/yr, it’s only 1.3mm/yr (source- Statistics NZ). That means that 25cm of sea level rise will take 192 years not the 17 years that the panicky professor said.

● the 25cm danger level seems to be his own creation – the ORC LIDAR data shows that South Dunedin is mostly over 1.0 metre above sea level and only a handful of properties are below 500mm. Probably there are no houses within 25cm of sea level; he says there are 1932. For the sea level to increase by 1.0 metre will take 769 years. Put it on your calendar.

● fear-monger Flynn tells us about the “huge erosion of polar ice” that started in 2014 – unfortunately he didn’t check the sea-level data which shows us that nothing unusual has happened to the sea level since 2014.

● Prof Flynn tried to scare us by saying that insurance companies are unlikely to cover sea-level rise in their policies in future (ODT- Flynn’s sea level figures disputed), but it turns out that even now, none of us are insured for sea-level rise. There has never been cover for gradual damage. He’s talking crap.

● The Otago Regional Council has had groundwater sensors at South Dunedin for several years and they tell us that there is no detectable increase in groundwater level (no increasing trend).
In fact, there is no reason for a rising sea to cause rising groundwater. There is no connection, except for some places which are close to the shoreline. Also, the South Dunedin groundwater level is about 600mm above sea level and so it is mostly not affected by the sea, since water doesn’t flow uphill. Have a look for yourself: the ORC has recently given us (almost) live groundwater sensor graphs for South Dunedin and other places – thanks ORC. There are four South Dunedin groundwater sites:

http://water.orc.govt.nz/WaterInfo/Catchment.aspx?r=Dunedin

Of the four groundwater sensors only the one closest to the shoreline shows a tidal influence. Other places similarly close to the sea are likely to have some tidal influence on their groundwater level. Further inland there is no effect.

[ends]

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At Facebook:

whatifdunedin says: Here is DCC and ORC’s outlandish and mythical project, designed to put Ratepayer Funds into the hands of private sector consultants for no good reason, and on it goes. Your elected representatives agreed to this rort:

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14.3.17 Brightness panicked [#effect]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

81 Comments

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Ancestral landscape, natural heritage, dark skies & the district plan #respect

[penguin.au.com]

Peninsula: Exploring the Otago Peninsula | Paul Sorrell
Rich in recreational opportunities and with a strong sense of culture and community, the peninsula is a place like no other. Author Paul Sorrell and photographer Graham Warman discover the sweeping landscapes, unique mix of wildlife and engaging local personalities found on this special slice of New Zealand’s southern coast…. Penguin promotion

### ODT Online Sat, 7 Sep 2013
People and place portrayed
By Helen Speirs – ODT books editor
PENINSULA: Exploring the Otago Peninsula by Paul Sorrell and Graham Warman (Penguin)
From its volcanic formation, to early Maori settlement and the first European visitors, the book traces the influences of humans on the land, examining fishing and farming practices and architectural landmarks including the Mason and Wales “White House”, Larnach Castle, Fletcher House, Otakou marae, Portobello Aquarium and Marine Studies Centre, and the Armstrong Disappearing Gun. […] The rich diversity of the “wildlife capital of New Zealand” is a highlight, with information about the area’s jewelled gecko, its multitude of birdlife – including Taiaroa Head’s northern royal albatross, New Zealand sea lions and yellow-eyed penguins. […] The book’s design and layout is simple and reader-friendly, the writing informative and accessible, and the photography stunning – the sweeping vistas of the peninsula land and seascapes, with the light playing on the water and shadows in the folds of the land are particularly evocative.
Read more

[teara.govt.nz]

Otago Peninsula by Colin McCahon [tepapa.govt.nz]

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P A P A N U I ● I N L E T ● W A K A ● F I N D

### ODT Online Tue, 14 Oct 2014
Historic waka find excites as peninsula gives up secret
By Hamish McNeilly
The discovery of a historic waka unearthed from Papanui Inlet is a “significant find”, a local kaumatua says. A waka – believed to be a fishing waka (waka hi ika) – measuring 6.17m was excavated from the edge of the inlet over the weekend, and is now in storage. Otakou runanga kaumatua Edward Ellison said the “exciting” discovery “sheds new light [on] the historical use and occupation of the Papanui Inlet and surrounds”. It was likely the vessel dated from the Ngati Mamoe occupation of that part of the Otago Peninsula, before “Ngai Tahu came down and pushed some of them further south”.
Read more

### ODT Online Thu, 16 Oct 2014
‘I knew it was something significant’
By John Lewis
If it were not for changing tidal flows, the fishing waka unearthed from Papanui Inlet on Otago Peninsula at the weekend might never have been discovered, Department of Conservation historic technical adviser Shar Briden said. The 6.17m waka was under 1.6m of sand and was discovered by chance in August by Ms Briden. She said the channel flow had changed, with the estuary water now cutting over the top of the waka. […] The waka was excavated and refloated using whale pontoons at the weekend, and moved across the estuary at high tide to where it could be retrieved. The waka is believed to be the only one found in Otago, and has archaeologists around the country buzzing.
Read more

### ODT Online Sun, 28 Dec 2014
Waka remnants give glimpse into past
By Shawn McAvinue
A waka submerged in a locked wooden tank at the Otakou marae in Dunedin continues to reveal the past to archaeologists. Te Runanga o Otakou manager Rachel Wesley said the fishing waka, unearthed from Papanui inlet on Otago Peninsula in October, was on the marae and submerged in fresh water in a locked wooden tank. […] The waka was moved to the marae in early December […] Samples of the waka had been sent to Auckland and Dunedin to determine its age. The waka conservation work would take more than two years […] Department of Conservation historic technical adviser Shar Briden said other wooden artefacts were found before the waka was discovered and they revealed some more about it.
Read more

### ODT Online Fri, 6 Feb 2015
Waka believed from the 1500s
By Hamish McNeilly
The historic waka unearthed from Papanui Inlet was used in the 1500s, it has been revealed. Dilys John, of Auckland University’s anthropology department, has dated the worked waka and the prepared fibres from inside the hull at being between 440 and 463 years old. Otakou runanga elder Edward Ellison said the waka remained in water at the marae, and the salt would slowly be removed out of the timber over the next two years. The waka would be preserved and then possibly be put on display […] It was believed the waka was used by Waitaha – the first occupants of the site – or Ngati Mamoe […] “The mere thought that the hands that made and used the hand-woven fibres belonged to ancestors who lived at Papanui Inlet at least 20 generations ago is quite breathtaking.” Dating the waka helped with comparisons with other sites around New Zealand and confirmed “the specialness of the Papanui Inlet”.
Read more

█ Anyone who found an object should leave the item in situ and report the find to the Department of Conservation. (ODT)

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D A R K ● S K I E S ● O T A G O ● P E N I N S U L A

### ODT Online Wed, 15 Apr 2015
Seeking dark sky city status
By Vaughan Elder
The Dunedin City Council is to investigate ways of limiting light pollution, after councillors were told Dunedin could become the world’s largest “dark sky city”. Otago Museum director Ian Griffin spoke about the issue of light pollution at yesterday’s planning and regulatory committee meeting when he discussed the museum’s planetarium development, which is to open later this year. “We see the planetarium as not just a brilliant educational tool [but also] potentially an anchor for a new strand of tourism in this city.” There was a massive potential for growth in night sky tourism in the city and the council could support that by acting to limit light pollution in areas such as Otago Peninsula, where viewing conditions were best, Dr Griffin said.
Read more

Downloads:
Evidence from Dr Ian Griffin 1.3.17
Evidence from Dr Ian Griffin Graphic supplement
Dr Ian Griffin Submitter Legal Counsel’s tabled submission 8.3.17

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P R O B L E M ● C H I L D R E N

### ODT Online Fri, 10 Apr 2015
Quarry operator faces hearing over breach
By Chris Morris
An Otago Peninsula quarry operator found to be digging beyond his boundary faces a public hearing to determine the future shape of the operation. The Papanui Inlet quarry operation, headed by Peninsula resident Steve Clearwater, was found to be in breach of its existing consent following an inspection by council staff early last year.
Read more

### ODT Online Fri, 31 Jul 2015
May need new consent, quarry hearing told
By John Gibb
A “catch-22” legal problem involving a quarry on Otago Peninsula means all parties, including the applicant and many submitters, may have been wasting their time attending a consent hearing. […] The hearing involves a quarry, which had operated as a smaller farm quarry before a consent allowed it to expand in 2007. Steve Clearwater Contracting, headed by peninsula resident Steve Clearwater, has been accused by council staff of not complying with rules designed to restrict his quarry’s operation. […] Council officials say the quarry was found to be operating beyond its boundary early last year, by extracting rock from further up Geary’s Hill than was permitted. The applicant, Peninsula Holdings Trust, is seeking a variation on its existing consent, to legalise what has been done, but it is also seeking to expand its footprint for future operations. The application has prompted 40 submissions, including 32 from neighbours, many opposing it.
Read more

### ODT Online Sat, 1 Aug 2015
Quarry hearing adjourned
By John Gibb
Independant commissioner Andrew Henderson has adjourned a Dunedin consent hearing to consider legal issues linked to a quarry overlooking Papanui Inlet in a “treasured ancestral landscape”. Mr Henderson, of Christchurch, said yesterday he would consider legal issues over how to proceed with an application, on behalf of the quarry operator, to vary conditions in an earlier 2007 consent, involving the quarry on Otago Peninsula.
Read more

Neighbours are fighting plans to expand a quarry overlooking Papanui Inlet, after it was found to be in breach of 10 resource consent conditions. (ODT)

### ODT Online Fri, 28 Aug 2015
Fears for Otago Peninsula hill
By Chris Morris
A quarry operator accused of flouting rules on Otago Peninsula could seek to remove a hill overlooking Papanui Inlet, neighbours fear. Steve Clearwater Contracting, headed by peninsula resident Steve Clearwater, has been accused by Dunedin City Council staff of showing “contempt” for rules designed to restrict his quarry’s operation. […] “Geary’s Hill, at the head of Papanui Inlet, is an integral part of a wider wahi tupuna [ancestral landscape]” […] The Otakou runanga was concerned about the “incremental carving away at the basic elements of this ancestral landscape leading to greater and irreversible changes”.
Read more

### ODT Online Wed, 23 Sep 2015
Quarry expansion plans scuttled
By Craig Borley
Controversial expansion plans for an Otago Peninsula quarry have been declined by an independent commissioner, but quarrying will continue on the site. The Geary’s Hill quarry, overlooking Papanui Inlet, was last year found to have breached many of its 2007 resource consent conditions. It had extended further up and across Geary’s Hill than consented, while a paddock consented to receive fill to a depth of 1m had since received considerably more than that. Dunedin City Council staff concluded it was in breach of at least 10 consent conditions, while compliance with another five was questionable. Quarry operator Steve Clearwater Contracting, headed by peninsula resident Steve Clearwater, had been forced to seek a variation on its existing consent to legalise what it had done, while also seeking to expand its footprint for future operations. Neighbours feared the variation, if accepted, could eventually lead to the complete removal of the hill. But that variation was declined last week and was now subject to a 15-working-day appeal period. […] The council had accepted it had been deficient in monitoring the 2007 consent.
Read more

### ODT Online Mon, 6 Feb 2017
Subdivision bid opposed
By David Loughrey
A plan to subdivide 260ha of rural Otago Peninsula land in an outstanding natural landscape area has run into serious opposition, as a resource consent bid heads for a March hearing. Groups from Forest and Bird to Save the Otago Peninsula (Stop), and individuals from peninsula tourism and accommodation businesses, as well as astronomers and archaeologists, have lined up to oppose the project. Land owner Steven Clearwater described opposition from property owners in the area as “nimbyism”. He said the farm on which the subdivision was planned had been dotted with farmhouses a century ago, and he wanted to protect his right to build there again. The project is the work of the Peninsula Holdings Trust, made up of property owners Steven and Jacqueline Clearwater and Brian Hailes. The trust has applied to the Dunedin City Council to subdivide the rural zoned land at 78 Cape Saunders Rd. The land has a capital value of almost $1.9million.
Read more

“Allowing property owners to subdivide small parcels for residential use scattered around a large farm property is not in accordance with the expectations of either the district plan or proposed plan.” –Lianne Darby

### ODT Online Mon, 13 Feb 2017
City planner opposes subdivision
By Margot Taylor
An application to subdivide 260ha of Otago Peninsula land in an outstanding natural landscape has hit another hurdle with a planner’s report recommending the application be declined. Dunedin City Council planner Lianne Darby recommended the council decline the bid to subdivide a property at 78 Cape Saunders Rd, citing negative effects on the environment and the potential  “undesirable” precedents it could set for rural zoning if approved. […] If such a proposal  were approved, there could be a “major change” to the appearance and character of the land, she found. The subdivision, on an isthmus of land between Hoopers Inlet and Papanui Inlet and the northern slopes of Mt Charles, was also inconsistent with aspects of the district plan relating to sustainability, land fragmentation, rural productive worth, roading and landscape, the report found. She did not believe the proposal, which would create 10 new sites, on which consent was sought for residential activity on eight, was a sustainable use of the city’s physical and natural resources. The proposed sites would be between 2ha and 194ha.
Read more

Downloads:
DCC Planner’s Report Pages 1-44
DCC Planner’s Report Pages 45-88

### ODT Online Wed, 8 Mar 2017
Papanui developer reduces sites plan
By David Loughrey
The developer of a subdivision on an Otago Peninsula isthmus has halved the number of houses planned for the site, surprising opponents ready to argue against the plan. Peninsula Holdings Trust came to a resource consent hearing in Dunedin yesterday with a proposal that reduced the number of houses in the outstanding natural landscape area from eight to four. Landowner Steven Clearwater told the hearing he had recently signed a conditional sale agreement for some of the land involved to nearby farmer. Plans for a covenanted area of wetland and a public walking track were withdrawn, after the buyer of the land made it “very clear” they were not to be offered. The change led hearing commissioner Colin Weatherall to adjourn the meeting after the trust made its submissions, allowing opponents time overnight to modify theirs.
Read more

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S U B D I V I S I O N ● A P P L I C A T I O N

Dunedin City Council
Non complying activity – 78 Cape Saunders Road – SUB-2016-58 & LUC-2016-336

Closed: 09/12/2016

Notification of Application for a Resource Consent – Under Section 93(2) of the Resource Management Act 1991.
The Dunedin City Council has received and notified the following application for Resource Consent:

Application description
Council has received an application to subdivide the above nine titles of 78 Cape Saunders Road into eleven lots and a balance parcel. The subdivision will create ten new sites of 2.0ha to 194ha. Eight of the new sites will be smaller than 15.0ha and are therefore considered to be undersized.
Land use consent is sought for new residential activity within proposed Landscape Building Platforms on Lots 1 to 2, 4 to 6, and 8 to 10. Lot 3 (38ha) has an existing quarry operation with an established dwelling. The amalgamated site of Lot 7 and 12 (194ha) will be a farming block with no dwelling, and will be subject to a covenant restricting all residential development of this site. The balance land of Part Lot 54 Papanui Maori Reserve Blk (residue CFR OT205/103) will be amalgamated with Lot 10.
The quarry operation will need to be reauthorised as it will be contained within a smaller site. It will be a discretionary (unrestricted) activity pursuant to Rule 6.5.6(v).
The subject sites are zoned Rural in the Dunedin City District Plan, and are within the Peninsula Coast Outstanding Landscape Area (Visually Recessive and Visually Prominent Areas). The general area is identified as being subject to land stability risks, and parts of the subject sites are potentially at risk to liquefaction.
Subdivision of a Rural-zoned site into lots smaller than 15.0ha is a non-complying activity pursuant to Rule 18.5.2 of the Dunedin City District Plan. The construction of buildings (dwellings) within a Landscape Building Platform is considered to be a controlled activity pursuant to Rule 14.6.1(a)(i). The proposed residential activity on those lots smaller than 15.0ha is also considered to be a non-complying activity pursuant to Rule 6.5.7(i).
The Proposed Second Generation District Plan (“the Proposed Plan”) was notified on 26 September 2016. Rules 16.7.4 (minimum site size for rural zones) and 16.9.5.5 (assessment of subdivision performance standard contraventions – minimum site size) were given immediate legal effect pursuant to section 86D of the Resource Management Act 1991 at the time of notification. Accordingly, the Proposed Plan rules also need to be considered alongside the Dunedin City District Plan rules.
The subject sites are zoned Rural – Peninsula Coast in the Proposed Second Generation Plan, and are within the Peninsula Coast Outstanding Natural Landscape. There are land stability risks identified for this site. Parts of the subject sites are shown as Hazard 2 – Land Instability, and Hazard 3 – Coastal. The coastal edges of the property are shown as Coastal Environment and Archaeological Alert Layer. There is a Wahi Tupuna Site 36 – Poatiri (Mt Charles) on-site.
Rule 16.7.4 specifies a minimum site size of 40.0ha for lots created by subdivision in the Rural – Peninsula Coast zone. The proposed subdivision is therefore a non-complying activity pursuant to Rule 16.7.4.3. The land use rules for the Rural zones are not yet in effect or operative.
The application is accompanied by Ecology, Landscape, Heritage, and Geotechnical Reports.

The submission period for this application has closed, and a hearing/decision is pending.

Consent number: Non complying activity – 78 Cape Saunders Road – SUB-2016-58 & LUC-2016-336
Name of applicant: The Peninsula Holding Trust
Location of site: 78 Cape Saunders Road, being that land held in Computer Freehold Registers 207075 (43.3047ha), 95918 (34.0552ha), 95919 (2004m2), OT15C/195 (20.5432ha), OT45/181 (5741m2), OT254/294 (18.2058ha), OT254/295 (20.8768ha), OT205/103 (102.9627ha), and OT11B/1033 (16.9917ha)
Address for service: The Peninsula Holding Trust, C/O Cubitt Consulting Ltd, 11 Bedford Street, Dunedin 9012

RELATED DOCUMENTS AT DCC WEBSITE:
● Evidence tabled at the hearing
● Submitter Pre-Hearing Evidence
● Applicant’s Pre-Hearing Evidence
● Agenda
● Application documents
● Submissions
Go to http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/notified-resource-consents/notified-applications-pending/sub-2016-58-and-luc-2016-336

Download: Applicant’s Photographs

[screenshots – click to enlarge] *see Clearwater’s quarry at Lot 3

Site plans

Applicant’s tabled site plan which includes covenants

Applicant’s tabled revised plan for Lot 4

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

10 Comments

Filed under Agriculture, Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Housing, Infrastructure, Media, Name, New Zealand, Ngai Tahu, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Travesty

Christchurch Cathedral : Marcus Brandt and the People’s Steeple Project

christchurch-cathedral-steeple-by-country-farm-garden-photos-cfgphoto-com-render1-1

While Bishop Victoria and the Anglican church property trust (CPT) continue to sit on their hands perhaps awaiting devine intervention, who knew, it turns out that a group of stalwart people in New Zealand – with an incredible level of international assistance – are busy planning a very special Cathedral project.

From: Mark Belton
Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2017 11:11 PM
To: [Elizabeth Kerr + RCC Mailing List]
Subject: Introducing The People’s Steeple

Dear Cathedral Restoration supporters

Below is a link to a video clip of the People’s Steeple proposal being demonstrated by its creator Marcus Brandt. Marcus has been in CHCH this last week promoting the People’s Steeple Project.

The People’s Steeple is a mind blowing proposal…audacious, visionary, inspiring. Lifting telescoping timber sections of the spire 60 metres into the sky…powered by about 500 trained people working 16 capstan winches placed around Cathedral Square, watched by up to 50,000 people in the Square.

The US based Timber Framers Guild (TFG), a professional organisation of engineers and timber framers has offered to be the lead contractor to build, assemble, and erect the People’s Steeple. The lead NZ engineers would be renowned CHCH timber engineer – Prof Andy Buchanan whose report on the project is attached.

Skilled TFG members from the US and around the world would gift their time, working in the Square preparing and assembling the timbers, and then helping lead the steeple’s erection. Up to 300 TFG members along with locals could be involved working in the Square over a period of about 6 months.

The TFG have successfully undertaken 75 community building projects over the last 25 years in the US and around the world. They are super keen to offer their services to CHCH. The TFG emphasise their projects are about ‘building communities’.

Marcus says would take only 2-3 hrs to lift and secure the telescoping sections. Flooring and bells would be assembled the same day and in the evening the bells would ring out…proclaiming to the world – ‘Christchurch is back’….and a Hangi feast would be opened…for a crowd of 50,000! International media would broadcast the event around the world…the whole enterprise being about engaging our community in the most positive way…and it would ignite fund raising for the restoration of the cathedral. It is envisaged the construction of the People’s Steeple would lead restoration of the cathedral and the Square.

It is noted huge pro bono contributions from the Guild’s members are being offered, and Blakely Pacific NZ Ltd, a US based forestry company has offered to provide the timbers at no cost from giant 125-year-old Port Orford Cedar from its Pioneer Forest in South Canterbury.

The Restore Christchurch Cathedral Group is strongly supportive of the People’s Steeple.

We hope this inspiring project will help engage and enthuse Christchurch people with recovery of the cathedral, and help get the cathedral restoration programme underway.

Warm regards

Mark Belton
Co-Chair, Restore Christchurch Cathedral

Mark Belton
Managing Director
Permanent Forests NZ Limited
PO Box 34, Lyttelton 8841, New Zealand

See attached reports by Marcus Brandt, Andy Buchanan, and the TFG.
TFG People’s Steeple Project approach notes-10-2-16
Steeple 16-8-12
M Belton report on Timber Framers Guild conf and People’s Steeple 23-9-16
Engineering the People’s Steeple v9

The People’s Steeple | Whare Films Published on Feb 23, 2017

christchurch-cathedral-tonyhphotography-co-nz-bw-render1-1

The People’s Steeple
Rebuilding the Bell Tower at Christchurch Cathedral

Marcus Brandt: An Introduction

For the last thirty years or so, I’ve been restoring historic stone and timber buildings, mostly in Southeastern Pennsylvania. I’m a working master carpenter and stone mason. Most of the historic buildings I am called to work on are 150 to 300 years old. Solid and well crafted, these old buildings tend to age well, but neglect and damage can take a toll. Much of my effort is spent in repairing and strengthening the timber frames of barns, bridges, houses, gristmills and churches. I’ve had several commissions to build new structures in the old style. I have organized and led many barn raisings, in which hundreds of volunteers gather to raise a barn’s frame in a day. A good crew will have the sides and roof on too.
Straightening, plumbing and repairing damaged stone walls is often called for. It is not uncommon to straighten a wall 10 meters high that is out of plumb by 400 or 500 mm. Having studied and worked with several Scots masons, I’m a strong believer in lime based mortars and good masonry practice. The interface between stone and timber is of particular interest to me.
Since 1989, I’ve been a professional member of the Timber Framers Guild (TFG) and a member of the Traditional Timberframe Research and Advisory Group (TTRAG). That part of the Guild focuses on understanding the past practice of the craft with a view that the past might help inform future practice. I have advised many historical and preservation societies and sat on many review boards.
As a result of my participation in Guild efforts and projects, I was invited to go to both Scotland and China to investigate “lost” technologies for the Public Broadcast Service series NOVA. We built working siege weapons in Scotland and in China we built a bridge design that hadn’t been built since the Mongol invasion.
I teach Traditional building skills at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA. I’m particularly interested in ways that the pre-industrial past practice can inform building in the greener, sustainable post-industrial world of the future.
I serve as a sailor, boson and ship’s carpenter aboard the tall ship Gazela (www.Gazela.org). That experience has taught me much about rigging and raising heavy loads in confined spaces. It’s taught me about erecting tall, secure, flexible, stable structures that get tossed about and shaken mercilessly. A sea captain in her own right, my wife serves as First Mate aboard Gazela. She out-ranks me, and helps keep me humble.
Since 22 February, I have been working as much as possible to develop a method to rebuild the Bell tower at Christchurch. With the help of friends and students, and the forbearance of my wife, I developed a plan that is beautiful, solid, strong, flexible, earthquake resistant, buildable, durable, and familiar. But more than anything, I want to use the rebuilding of the steeple as a vehicle for rebuilding and strengthening the community. And, once built, serve as an outward witness to the inward love we have for each other as fellow humans.
I look forward to doing this project with the able help of my best friends in the world…many of whom I haven’t yet met.

█ More information about the People’s Steeple Project and participants at http://thepeoplessteeple.org/

christchurch-cathedral-detail-mygola-com-tweaked

Related Posts and Comments:
23.12.15 Christ Church Cathedral: practical news from govt mediator…
14.7.12 Rival newspaper on historic heritage #cathedral
2.3.12 Christ Church, Cathedral Square

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

christchurch-cathedral-detail-with-chalice-sisson-photography-photoshelter-com

christchurch-cathedral-mudbirdceramics-blogspot-co-nz

christchurch-cathedral-5-aug-2003-by-cindy-staticflickr-com-tweaked

*Images: Christchurch Cathedral – (from top) colour render by whatifdunedin [photo source: Country Farm Garden Photos at cfgphoto.com]; black white render by whatifdunedin [photo source: Tony H Photography at tonyhphotography.co.nz]; colour photo of steeple detail [mygola.com]; cathedral with chalice by Sisson Photography [via photoshelter.com]; black white photo by Mudbird Ceramics [mudbirdceramics.blogspot.co.nz]; colour photo by Cindy taken on 5 Aug 2003 [via staticflickr.com]

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STUPIDLY EXPENSIVE crossings, legal status? —Not universally recognised road markings

zebra-crossing-by-marian-kamensky-caglecartoons-com-1The urban design team(?!) lost it before they ever got it.

At Facebook, Alan Wilson says: “My concern is the cost. $140,000 for two crossings. Too many other things need money spent on upgrading”

Tony McAuliffe says: “….The Zebra crossing works, in part, ’cause they’re universally recognised for what they are. But 3-D pedestrian crossings? While they look fantastic, how will they perform functionally? If they don’t – and (hypothetically) a pedestrian gets clobbered because a driver fails to perceive them for what they’re meant to be – who’s prepared to answer the awkward questions?”

Too right. Bullshit City: Walk this way: 3-D crossings set to dazzle (ODT)
“Crossing the road in Dunedin’s tertiary precinct will be much more fun from this week, with the installation of two 3-D pedestrian crossings in Clyde St.”

Nothing grey pavement paint can’t remove on a dark night.

The frigging murals like a hippy rash about town are bad enough. A couple of internationally-authored ones are ‘art’, but the rest count as amateur copyist dross (mostly by technically challenged locals) wrecking our unique urban vistas.

****

mural-applied-to-raw-red-brick-alley-next-to-104-bond-st-guy-mauve-at-flickr-comThanks to irresponsible building owners and ‘know-it-all-bend-the-rules’ city officials (friends of the irresponsible owners), this mural was applied to raw red brick in the side alley at 98 Bond St —contrary to the Dunedin City District Plan for listed precincts. This industrial building, a rare remnant, dates to the 1860s.
SHAME ON ALL INVOLVED.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Images: caglecartoons.com – Zebra Crossing by Marian Kamensky | flickr.com – mural at 98 Bond St by Guy Mauve

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Cadbury, wtf ?

****

### ODT Online Thu, 16 Feb 2017
BREAKING NEWS
350 jobs to go as Cadbury closes
By Dene Mackenzie
After years of speculation and concern, the Cadbury factory in Dunedin will finally close next year, leaving about 350 people facing an uncertain future. Staff were told of the closure at a meeting on site at 10am.
The popular tourism attraction Cadbury World is closed today but will reopen tomorrow.
Mondelez International, the owner of Cadbury, confirmed the closure this morning telling its staff 200 people would be made redundant by the end of the year.
Read more

### ODT Online Thu, 16 Feb 2017
Cadbury World to remain open in Dunedin
Dunedin tourist attraction Cadbury World will remain open despite the planned closure of Cadbury’s manufacturing plant in the city. Cadbury owner Mondelēz International today announced its plan to move manufacturing to Australia, with the loss of 350 jobs in Dunedin. In a statement the company said it remained committed to Cadbury World, which attracts 110,000 visitors a year.
Read more

█ Dunedin, One of the World’s Great Small Cities… Really ?

The future:
Not much chocolate, no Safe and Secure electricity, no developing population.
Dunedin: Dead and inDebted, with Dave.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Warrington : DCC dictates loss of community’s grassed recreation reserve to freeloaders

Received.
Tue, 14 Feb 2017 at 9:57 p.m.

Due to recent heavy rain part of the domain at Warrington has been fenced off by DCC. This hasn’t stopped 90 freedom camping vehicles from jamming into the remaining part of the domain ….think of the camp fees greater Dunedin’s commercial campgrounds are missing out on —this is a normal Tuesday night, middle of the week, and 90 vehicles are parking for free in the domain.

Thanks to Dunedin City councillors and council staff Warrington’s domain has been allowed to turn into an unregulated free-for-all camping site – contrary to the council’s own Camping Control Bylaw 2015.

And with so many vehicles continuing to drive on the domain there is less and less grass, and more mud and dirt, and more gravel going to be placed to cover what used to be the local community’s grassed recreational reserve.

[images supplied]
warrington-domain-14-2-17-1
warrington-domain-14-2-17-2
warrington-domain-14-2-17-3a

Quick video scan of site:

iDunedin Published on Feb 14, 2017
Warrington Domain February 14 2017

****

warrington-1

To reiterate:

Dunedin City Council
23. Camping Control Bylaw 2015 (PDF, 2.5 MB)
The purpose of this bylaw is to protect, promote, and maintain public health and safety by regulating freedom camping within the district; and restrict freedom camping in public places within the district. Link
Date approved: 01 November 2015

DCC 23. Camping Control Bylaw 2015dcc-bylaw-23-camping-sites-warrington-recreation-reserve

dcc-bylaw-23-schedule-b-restricted-areas-for-freedom-camping-self-contained-vehicles-only

dcc-bylaw-23-schedule-c-unrestricted-areas-for-freedom-camping

Section 9. Offences and penalties
1. In accordance with section 20(1) of the Act, every person who breaches this bylaw commits an infringement offence.
2. In accordance with section 27 of the Act, an enforcement officer may issue an infringement notice to anyone who the enforcement officer believes on reasonable grounds has committed or is committing an infringement offence as set out in section 20(1) of the Act (a copy of which is included as Schedule D of this Bylaw for information only).
3. A person who commits an infringement offence is liable to a $200 infringement fee for each offence.

****

Related Posts and Comments:
6.2.17 Uncontrolled freedom camping at Warrington Domain this weekend —DCC ‘hell model’ [no enforcement]
1.2.17 “Fake news” from DCC boffins & Community Board re freedom camping at Warrington Domain #TheBlight

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Uncontrolled freedom camping at Warrington Domain this weekend —DCC ‘hell model’ [no enforcement]

Fair-minded councils ban freedom campers from parks and reserves.

DCC is not a fair-minded council.

Last year DCC staff told local residents that this summer (2016/17) the council intends to allow freedom camper vehicles to take up the whole domain at Warrington….

DCC 23. Camping Control Bylaw 2015dcc-bylaw-23-camping-sites-warrington-recreation-reserve

[click to enlarge]
warrington-recreation-reserve-feb-2016-overlay-shows-designated-areas-for-freedom-camper-vehicles-according-to-dcc-bylaw-23-see-map-p20Warrington Recreation Reserve, February 2016. Annotated overlay shows designated areas for freedom camper vehicles according to Bylaw 23 (see above Map, or go to page 20).

****

Note: Maps installed by DCC at the Domain aren’t consistent with the Bylaw Map above (page 20), and don’t represent the Bylaw conditions (page 7):

site-map-at-warrington-recreation-reserve-2016-1

****

T H E ● L O N G ● ‘W A I T A N G I’ ● W E E K E N D

*Remember, no DCC enforcement applies.

Last night (Sun, 5 Feb) 110 vehicles were counted in Warrington Domain — plus tents. It’s estimated that 30% were New Zealanders getting a free camp ground.

In terms of costs…. if DCC is spending $80,000 per year on freedom camping and if 8,000 people per year are staying at Warrington Domain, then Ratepayers are paying $10/night on their accommodation. As opposed to the campers paying.

There was also a party there last night with loud music until after midnight.

Images supplied.

● Sunday evening, 5 Feb 2017 [click to enlarge]

warrington-domain-5-2-17-2

warrington-domain-5-2-17-1

● Monday morning, 6 Feb 2017 [click to enlarge]

litter-6-2-17-one-nights-worth-following-bin-clearance-by-contractors-1

warrington-domain-6-2-17-1

The council contractors said they emptied the bins yesterday (Sunday), so this is just one night’s worth of rubbish:

litter-6-2-17-one-nights-worth-following-bin-clearance-by-contractors

****

Dunedin City Council
23. Camping Control Bylaw 2015 (PDF, 2.5 MB)
The purpose of this bylaw is to protect, promote, and maintain public health and safety by regulating freedom camping within the district; and restrict freedom camping in public places within the district. Link

Date approved: 01 November 2015

** Review date: [No date given. However, DCC is currently consulting on the Proposed Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017 and seeks public submissions by February 10, 2017. As part of the bylaw review DCC is considering restricting numbers of vehicles at Warrington to 50 vehicles per night. This is still too many as it equates to over 100 people living in the domain every night. Warrington has a resident population of around 400 people so an additional 100+ is a big increase.]

Within Section 3. [Interpretation] of the bylaw, it says:
Freedom camp means to camp (other than at a camping ground) within 200m of a motor vehicle accessible area or the mean low-water springs line of any sea or harbour, or on or within 200m of a formed road or a Great Walks Track, using one or more of the following:
(a) A tent or other temporary structure;
(b) A caravan;
(c) A car, campervan, housetruck, or other motor vehicle.

In this bylaw freedom camping does not include the following activities:
(a) Temporary or short term parking of a motor vehicle;
(b) Recreational activities commonly known as day-trip excursions;
(c) Resting or sleeping at the roadside in a caravan or motor vehicle to avoid driver fatigue.

Freedom Camping has the same meaning as freedom camp

Self-contained vehicle means a car, campervan, housetruck, or other motor vehicle designed and built for the purpose of camping which has the capability of meeting the ablutionary and sanitary needs of occupants of that vehicle for a minimum of three days without requiring any external services or discharging any waste and is certified that it complies with New Zealand Standard 5465:2001 Self Containment of Motor Caravans and Caravans.

The bylaw includes the following sections:

Section 4. Purpose
The purpose of this bylaw is to:
Define the local authority areas in Dunedin where freedom camping is restricted, and the restrictions that apply to freedom camping in those areas, and to define the local authority areas in the City where freedom camping is prohibited, to achieve one or more of the following purposes:
(a) The areas are protected
(b) The health and safety of the people who may visit the areas is protected
(c) Access to the areas is protected

Section 5. Restrictions on Freedom Camping
(a) A person must not freedom camp in any local authority areas within a prohibited zone, as identified in Schedule A of this bylaw.
(b) A person may only freedom camp in any restricted area, as identified in Schedule B, if they are using a self-contained vehicle where they comply with specified conditions in this schedule or displayed on the site.
(c) A person may freedom camp in any area where freedom camping is unrestricted, as identified in Schedule C where they comply with specified conditions in this schedule or displayed on the site.
(d) A person freedom camping in accordance with 5 (b) or (c) must not stay at any one local authority area for more than two consecutive nights.

dcc-bylaw-23-schedule-b-restricted-areas-for-freedom-camping-self-contained-vehicles-only

dcc-bylaw-23-schedule-c-unrestricted-areas-for-freedom-camping

Section 9. Offences and penalties
1. In accordance with section 20(1) of the Act, every person who breaches this bylaw commits an infringement offence.
2. In accordance with section 27 of the Act, an enforcement officer may issue an infringement notice to anyone who the enforcement officer believes on reasonable grounds has committed or is committing an infringement offence as set out in section 20(1) of the Act (a copy of which is included as Schedule D of this Bylaw for information only).
3. A person who commits an infringement offence is liable to a $200 infringement fee for each offence.

****

There has been no response from DCC to my LGOIMA request dated 22 January 2017. See previous post:

█ 1.2.17 “Fake news” from DCC boffins & Community Board re freedom camping at Warrington Domain #TheBlight

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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MORE DCC bull dust and poor investment #Sammy’s

Let’s have the Dunedin City Council compete directly with Private Business, again. This purchase underlines the fact that DCC is covert, lacking transparency and accountability.

Irresponsible unprogrammed spending. Where does it end.

Other people were interested in the property and had the funds. They have obviously been blindsided by the Council machine and Oakwood…. say no more.

The warehouse precinct (lower case) is a ‘success’ only in that buildings have been strengthened at a time when it was economically feasible to do so –a window. But the precinct reads and is experienced as a wasteland – no street life. Very few decently paying leases. Very early days.

Of course, no-one should rain on the parade. What parade.

Sammy’s is another sinkhole for Ratepayer funds ….such that the Stadium is Dead and continues to cost +$20million per annum. Wall Street Mall has no building Warrant of Fitness, and neither does the redeveloped Dunedin Town Hall complex. Does City Property even know how to run a pencil sharpener.

Does DCC know how to budget for core infrastructure upgrades and renewals. Nope. What’s that. The Auditor has already had a go at that (pipes); this was well before Aurora/Delta came on the public radar.

DCC is in complete disarray. And the majority of elected representatives are dreamers. It’s that bad.

Oh but we should be joyful, culturally upstanding. Led by the little Hawkins lad in shitty diapers, no doubt with Benson-Pope and Cull in behind. Christ all mighty. These types wouldn’t survive in the market place. OPM.

Lastly, this is the council who having assessed and promoted the warehouse precinct COMPLETELY FAILED TO LIST the centrepiece – the former His Majesty’s Theatre and Agricultural Hall – in the heritage schedule of the Dunedin City district plan – so bright and switched on were they. OPM.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Sammy’s purchase secures part of Dunedin’s heritage

The Dunedin City Council has secured a piece of Dunedin’s history and opened up future possibilities with the purchase of the Sammy’s building on Crawford Street.

This item was published on 03 Feb 2017

The sale is unconditional and the DCC will take possession of the building on 10 February.

Community and Culture Committee Chair Cr Aaron Hawkins says, “Sammy’s has played a huge role in Dunedin’s social and cultural history, so it’s exciting for our community to be able to start thinking about its future.

“Some of the best live shows I’ve ever seen were at Sammy’s, and it’s still one of the most beautiful venues in the country. It would’ve been an absolute travesty had it been sold and bowled, but now it’s safe for another generation of artists and audiences to enjoy.”

Cr Hawkins says the DCC usually supports private property owners to retain and redevelop heritage buildings, but in this case the building was significant enough to warrant DCC investment.

As development of the Warehouse Precinct progresses towards the overbridge and over to Bond Street, Sammy’s will be an anchor building for the area.

The DCC paid $128,000 for the building. It does not own the land, but Cr Hawkins says the DCC has established a great relationship with the owner of the site, Oakwood Properties, and has secured a rent holiday for the next two years while the future of the building is decided in consultation with the community.

An options paper will go to the Council before Easter, looking at what could be done with the building. The paper will look at ways to involve the arts and business communities in decisions about the building’s function, how it might look and how it fits with its surroundings. The development of the building is likely to be a partnership venture.

Team Leader Urban Design Crystal Filep says, “Local creativity and skills, supported by the DCC, have driven development in the Warehouse Precinct. It’s a model that’s working well for the city and we hope to take a similar approach here.”

Built in 1896, the building was called Her Majesty’s Theatre while Queen Victoria was monarch, then changed to His Majesty’s Theatre during King Edward VII’s reign. The adjoining Agricultural Hall was built in 1902.

Contact DCC on 03 477 4000.

[ends]

Related Post and Comments:
18.11.15 SAVE Sammy’s (former His Majesty’s Theatre & Agricultural Hall

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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DCC hideous ‘Adam of your labours’

ODT 28.1.17 (page 30)

2017-01-28-20-33-02[phoneshot scribbled – click to enlarge]

DCC is rubbish governance.

Comparing the two territorial authorities, ORC and DCC, ODT says “the regional council has been a wiser council-company owner”.

Ain’t that the sheer truth with bells on, oversewn with screaming sirens and flashing red lights.

Stuff that up your blood-soaked jumper, Dunedin City Council.

DCC takes the knife to Ratepayers’ private wealth, there’s no sign of let up. Blunt force trauma, gushing blood and the decimated entrails of a city once thriving.

The squalid recent history of Dunedin City Council is one of incompetence and worse : failed schemes, massive overburden of debt, inability to prioritise, budget and project manage, crippling levels of deferred maintenance and upgrades for essential infrastructure, unprosecuted thefts, corruption in certain of the CCOs and serious questions about the holding company (last year, a ‘partial audit’), Otago power network assets burnt off (no safety and security of supply), a dead loss-making stadium and associated companies clawing $20million per annum off ratepayers (no valid explanation, just mindless spin), destruction of high class Taieri soils for housing sprawl initiated by city councillor with a private profit motive, trite succession of gormless city councillors lining own pockets/inflating egos at the council table – leaches and nematodes have more credibility. On it goes at DCC.

Otago Regional Council is debt free.

### ODT Online Sat, 28 Jan 2017
Editorial: City and ORC merger unlikely
OPINION Any progress towards one or more unitary authorities in Otago will be difficult, largely because of the region’s geography. The Dunedin City Council this week ordered a report into a possible merger between it and the Otago Regional Council, and it would be surprising if proposals which might emerge make much headway with the Local Government Commission.
….Since 1988, the [ORC] has received a total of $148.9million in dividends and special payments from Port Otago. How the city must covet that cash. Given the city’s pressures on Delta/Aurora for dividends and the regional council’s hands-off attitude to the Port Company, it would seem, however, the regional council has been a wiser council-company owner.
Read more

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SDHB/Govt : Physio Pool GRIEF

Girl in water with dumbbels140 Hanover St [rankedbyreview.co.nz]

Pool upgrade supposed to happen a year ago this month.

### ODT Online Mon, 23 Jan 2017
Grant lost as physio pool work stalls
By Eileen Goodwin
A $120,000 grant has been pulled from the Dunedin physiotherapy pool upgrade because no-one yet knows when — or even if — it will happen. And the Otago Therapeutic Pool Trust has confirmed a second grant, of $100,000, is subject to an extension review and a decision is awaited.
Pool trust secretary-treasurer Neville Martin […] hopes to know more by June, when the Ministry of Health is expected to release a shortlist of site options for the $300 million Dunedin Hospital rebuild.
Read more

“To avoid closure of the pool by the Southern District Health Board, the trust has been required to cover all operating costs since the beginning of 2015.” –Neville Martin

Related Posts and Comments:
2.10.16 WHO says ‘heritage rules are too restrictive’ —What’s their agenda in the Heritage City
21.8.14 Dirty pool? #SDHB #University
6.8.14 Otago Therapeutic Pool at Dunedin Hospital

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC LGOIMA Response : Wall Street Mall and Town Hall Complex

Email correspondence.

From: DCC Governance Support
Sent: Friday, 20 January 2017 8:48 a.m.
To: Elizabeth Kerr
Subject: Official information response 280070 Council Buildings WOF

Dear Ms Kerr,

Official information request for information about COUNCIL BUILDINGS WOF

I refer to your official information request dated 28-November-2016 for the following information. Our response to each question is in red font [italics at this website -Eds]:

1. Does the council-owned Wall Street Mall (211 George St, Dunedin) have a current building warrant of fitness, and if not why not?

The Wall Street Mall at 211 George Street does not have a building warrant of fitness. The current status of the Wall Street Mall building warrant of fitness is that a Letter in Lieu was issued for the Specified Systems 15.3, 15.4, 15.5 because a full 12 months’ worth of daily inspections had not been completed. We can confirm that since July, 2015, these daily checks have been in place and this will not be an issue for subsequent warrants of fitness.

Please note that where a Letter in Lieu is issued this means the Independent Qualified Person (IQP) confirms that the systems in the building are working as they should and are compliant.

2. Since the construction of Wall Street Mall was completed in what years has it had a current building warrant of fitness issued, and if not why not?

Mar 2012 – Outstanding form 12A for Specified System 6 (Riser Mains).
Mar 2013 – Letter in lieu issued for Specified System 6 (Riser Mains).
Nov 2013 – Building Warrant of Fitness Received.
Sep 2015 – Letter in lieu issued for 2014/15 & 2015/16 compliance year for Specified System 15/3.
Regarding the reasons for this, please refer to the comments of the Manager, City Property below.

3. Does the council-owned Dunedin Town Hall complex, including Glenroy Theatre, Metro Cinema, and Municipal Chambers, have a current building warrant of fitness(s), and if not why not?
Since the major Dunedin Town Hall Redevelopment Project was completed (including Glenroy Theatre, Metro Cinema, and Municipal Chambers) in what years has it had a current building warrant of fitness(s) issued, and if not why not?.

There is no building warrant of fitness in place for these premises. Instead the Dunedin Town Hall complex, including the Municipal Chambers, Dunedin Centre and the Metro Theatre, have a Certificate of Public Use in place. This means the buildings are safe to use.

These buildings do not have a current Building Warrant of Fitness as, at time of writing, no current Code of Compliance has been issued following the completion of the redevelopment work as there were some building elements requiring attention relating to fire engineering. These elements have been completed and the documentation submitted to DCC Building Compliance for Final Inspection and issue of the Code Compliance. Once the Code Compliance Certificate has been issued there will be nothing to prevent the issue of a warrant of fitness at the next inspection.

If you wish to discuss this information with us, please feel free to contact Property Manager Kevin Taylor on 03 477 4000. Mr Taylor has prepared the following report for the chief executive. This is provided for your information:

The DCC Property department has previously engaged an outside contractor to administer and manage the BWOF compliance on DCC properties, in particular the Wall St Mall. In early 2015, the Building Compliance aspect was sold to Logic Project Management Consultants and a new company called Logic FM was formed and took over the majority DCC BWOF administration.

Our experience as we undertake building audits is that previous advice may have been too lax or liberal in assessing the building’s compliance with particular codes, specifically around fire protection and fire cells. We have also found that the inspections that were contracted to have been undertaken were not fulfilled, leaving gaps in the compliance processes. Thus the BWOF could not be issued by deadline or due dates.

Subsequently, it has been our experience that Logic FM has been interpreting code compliance components beyond that required by the law and schedules to the Acts governing the specified systems. Thus we have experienced a number of “notice to fix” instructions issued which are in error.

To satisfy ourselves that the BWOF is being managed and administered as it should be, DCC Property has engaged independent experts, especially structural and fire engineers, to review the building’s specified systems and as-built safety components. These independent audits have been completed and the required reports and Letters in Lieu issued to enable the DCC Building Authority to issue the BWOF.

The BWOF owners inspections have been brought in-house and are undertaken by the property team’s asset management staff. IQP inspections continue with the specific trades as required.

Yours sincerely

Governance Support Officer
Dunedin City Council Continue reading

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, DVML, Economics, Education, Finance, Fire and Emergency NZ, Heritage, Infrastructure, New Zealand, OAG, Ombudsman, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Structural engineering, What stadium

Scandal : DCC / Delta obfuscate over destruction of Heritage Rose Collection

northern-cemetery-dunedin-dbimage-cwgc-orgNorthern Cemetery, Dunedin [swgc.org]

DCC indicates support for efforts to track down rare rose varieties across New Zealand. Initial focus on replacing up to 100 memorial roses and rarest roses in the collection.

█ This is not the same as DCC and Delta taking responsibility for the crime.

### ODT Online Wed, 18 Jan 2017
Six years to replace rare roses after mystery spray
By Vaughan Elder
Returning an internationally significant rose garden at Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery to its former glory will be a “huge job” and likely take six years. This news comes as Delta, the contractor responsible for looking after greenspace at the cemetery, was criticised over a lack of accountability at how a mystery substance came to be sprayed on the roses. Heritage Roses Otago convener Fran Rawling said it was becoming apparent more roses were affected than initially thought. About 500 roses, more than 40% of the about 1200 at the cemetery, were showing signs of damage. Despite some regrowth, she believed most would have to be ripped out along with any contaminated soil.
Read more

Otago Daily Times Published on Jan 17, 2017
Rare roses damaged in Dunedin Cemetery
Heritage Roses Otago convener Fran Rawling talks about damage to roses in Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery.

Heritage Roses Otago committee member Robyne Selbie has hit out at Delta saying it had shown a lack of accountability over the damage to the roses. “Accidents happen. We can accept that but the culture of ‘cover up and deny responsibility’ until proven otherwise seems to be established in this company,” she said in a letter to the Otago Daily Times. (ODT)

DCC is rather good at unbelievable (faith breaking) spin, its well-practised hopeless resort when all else has already failed. Interested public v DCC (1 : 0)

Robyne Selbie maintains that ‘As the contractor responsible for spraying, it was up to Delta to prove it was not responsible.’

Hear hear, Robyne! Don’t hold your breath.

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souvenirdelamalmaison-northern-cemetery-dunedin-fionaknox-files-wordpress-com-jan-2015Souvenir de la Malmaison – Northern Cemetery [Fiona Knox]

█ [blog] Fiona Knox: The 1,001 roses of the Dunedin Northern Cemetery
There are well over 1,001 roses in the Dunedin Northern Cemetery. About one hundred of these are Memorial Roses – roses planted as by descendants and relatives for those buried in the plots – and the remainder are roses that Heritage Roses Otago have purchased and planted, and continue to care for. The roses chosen are those in keeping with the age of the Cemetery, which was opened in 1872. You’ll find species roses; once-flowering European roses of delicious perfume: Gallica, Alba, Centifolia, and Damask roses; the elegant ever-flowering roses of Asian extraction: the Chinas and Tea roses; and their hybrids, up to, but not including Hybrid Tea roses. None of our roses are ever sprayed, and we never water the roses. 
Read more

Website: Heritage Roses Society New Zealand
Facebook: Heritage Roses New Zealand

Website: New Zealand Rose Society/Otago
Facebook: The Otago Rose Society [Dunedin]

Picloram herbicide (amine salt formulation) controls the likes of old mans beard, spindleweed, wild ginger, japanese honeysuckle, willows, gorse, wandering dew, woolly nightshade, ivy and many more hard to control woody weeds.

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Earlier coverage

### ODT Online Sat, 17 Dec 2016
Anger after cemetery roses sprayed with herbicide
More than 380 roses in Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery, some of which are more than 130 years old, have been sprayed with some kind of herbicide. Heritage Roses Otago convener Fran Rawling told the Otago Daily Times yesterday she was shocked and angered by the action, particularly by the damage to 40 memorial roses planted by families of some of those buried at the cemetery in the 1870s. […] Dunedin City Council parks operations manager Hamish Black said the council was working to identify the source of the chemical damage.
Read more

ODT 22.12.16 (page 2) [click to enlarge]
odt-22-12-16-dave-cannan-the-wash-deltas-role-part-of-spray-mystery-inquiry-p2

Is DCC shielding Delta over the spraying ???? Because now we find no report until after Christmas ???!!!! Damage control in more ways than one, perhaps.

### ODT Online Sat, 24 Dec 2016
Damage to roses, bushes, trees
Trees and native bushes are now thought to have been damaged by a mysterious substance which decimated heritage roses at a Dunedin cemetery. The results of tests to determine what damaged as many as 500 roses in the Northern Cemetery, some  more than 130 years old, were expected to be released this week. However, council parks operations manager Hamish Black yesterday said  results were now expected to be released next month.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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ODT feature : Streets of gold #Dunedin

In case you missed the ODT four-part series on Dunedin’s residential heritage in late December….. here it is, via Dave Cannan’s The Wash (Facebook).




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█ The four parts, abridged for quick reference and linked here below, had an excellent (research) information follow-up by Kim Dungey.

Some very approximate dates have been added care of Quality Value (QV), these are based on (limited) property records held by councils; as well as year dates for historical architects, where known.

Streets of Gold, a Summer Times series celebrating Dunedin’s rich architectural heritage. In collaboration with Heritage New Zealand researchers Heather Bauchop and Susan Irvine, with additional research by David Murray, archivist, Hocken Collections; and Alison Breese, archivist, Dunedin City Council.

### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: High St
High Street has an association with the medical profession dating back to the 1880s, when the Mornington cable car started running and some impressive new houses were built along its route.

CAVENDISH CHAMBERS, 211 High St.
The company behind the venture, Medical Buildings Ltd, was incorporated on March 1, 1926, and the shareholders all took professional rooms in the new property. The building was completed in 1927. Architect: Eric Miller (1896-1948).

236 HIGH ST
This prominent residence (QV: c.1900?) with a turret and projecting windows was designed in 1888 for Scottish-born Dr Frank Ogston. Ogston gained his medical degree in Aberdeen and emigrated to Dunedin in 1886 to take up a position as a lecturer in medical jurisprudence and hygiene at the University of Otago. Architect: Henry Hardy (1830-1908), and builder-developer.

238 HIGH ST
An Arts and Crafts-style design, the house (QV: c.1909?) is finished in roughcast with brick exposed on the ground floor sills. It was built for Dr D.E. Williams and his family as a private residence and doctor’s surgery and was home to the Williams family until the 1960s. Architect: Basil Hooper (1876-1960).

296 HIGH ST
Built in 1904, the Chalet Hospital (a private facility) was described as being “finished in coloured and tuck-pointed brickwork … the whole of the relief and ornament is carried out in bold cornices over the windows”. Architect: John Louis Salmond (1868-1950).

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: York Pl
York Place features two large homes once owned by members of the Speight family.

LARBERT VILLA – 371 York Pl
It is unclear exactly when the villa was built. Coppersmith Alexander Burt, of A and T Burt, married Janet Crawford in 1866 (they had a family of six sons and three daughters) and the couple were living in York Pl by July 1868 when Janet gave birth to a son at the house.

FORMER SPEIGHT RESIDENCE – 362 York Pl
Built for Jessie and Charles Speight after their marriage in 1898, the residence appears in the Dunedin City Council rates records in the 1899-1900 year. Architect: J.L. Salmond.

HAEATA – 273 York Pl
The residence of Charles and Jessie Speight from the time it was built in 1915, it remained in the Speight family until 1960. Bearing a strong resemblance to the Theomin family’s Olveston (built 1907, designed by Sir Ernest George). Architect: John Brown (1875-1923), a neighbour.

MRS TURNBULL’S GROCERY STORE – 324 York Pl
Known more than a century ago as Mrs Turnbull’s Grocery Store, this unusual wedge-shaped building began life as a home, stables and shop built for John and Janet Turnbull in 1875. In January 1875 tenders were invited for a two-storey dwelling and shop to be constructed of wood. Architect and Surveyor: E.J. Sanders [aka Saunders].

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Wed, 28 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: Highgate
Highgate has a fascinating and storied collection of prominent dwellings.

RENFREW HOUSE – 111 Highgate
Thought to have originated as a single-storey bluestone house with a central front door and double hung windows on each side. A second storey was later added. The exterior walls were built of double stone – more than 70cm thick – and the interior walls of double brick. With its wrought iron lacework, it has been described as one of the “finest examples of classic Victorian architecture in Dunedin”. Home of businessman Andrew McFarlane (1842-1904) and his wife Jane Wilson (1847-1920). By the 1890s, the family referred to their home as “Renfrew House”. Architect: credited to Nathaniel Wales (1832-1903), a neighbour.
 
KAWARAU – 204 Highgate
Designed in 1900 for dredging tycoon Alexander McGeorge, this grand residence reflects the fortunes made in Otago’s gold dredging boom of the late 1890s and early 20th century. Trained at Dunedin firm Cossens and Black, McGeorge (1868-1953) held a variety of significant engineering posts. The two-storeyed house is built of brick, has a slate roof, ornate decorative detailing, and features Tudor influences in the half timbering and veranda details. Architect: J.L. Salmond.

FORMER HUXTABLE RESIDENCE – 233 Highgate
This 1907 brick and tile residence designed for Anna and Alexander Huxtable, is a beautifully detailed example of an Edwardian villa, one with historic and architectural significance. Anna Huxtable was granted the land in 1907; a survey on May 15, 1907, indicates the foundations for the new dwelling were already in place at that date. (QV: c.1910?). Alexander Murray Huxtable described himself as both a commercial agent and patent medicine manufacturer. Architect: Edward Walden (1870-1944).

MELROSE – 384 Highgate
Likely designed for lawyer Arthur Nation (1852-1927) around 1876. In October that year, tenders were called for the construction of a “brick cottage” in the suburb of Melrose (a private subdivision in what is now known as Roslyn). However, Nation appears to have built more than a cottage: when his property was offered for sale in 1879 it was described as “a substantially-built and well-finished brick house”, its original features including hand-painted ceilings, timber joinery and stained glass. Architect: credited to John McGregor (1838-1911), and harbour engineer.

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Thu, 29 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: Royal Tce
Royal Terrace has a fascinating and storied collection of prominent dwellings.

DAISY BANK – 12 Royal Tce
Associated with the prominent Hudson family. An Italianate, two-storeyed symmetrical house with a large basement, “Daisy Bank” was built of concrete and wood, circa 1897. Architect: J.A. Burnside (1856-1920).

LINDEN – 22 Royal Tce
Built in the 1870s, a two-storied, two-bay Victorian residence of more than 15 rooms, with an exterior comprising plastered triple brick with quoins, foundations of Leith Valley andesite and a slate roof. Associated with the prominent Isaacs and Hudson families. Architect: Mason and Wales (likely Nathaniel Wales).

CLAVERTON – 30 Royal Tce
Associated with prominent local politician and businessman Richard H. Leary and one of New Zealand’s most prominent artistic families, the Hodgkins. Claverton was most likely built in 1877 by local politician and businessman Richard H. Leary (1840-95). Architect: likely Maxwell Bury (1825-1912).

ALYTH – 34 Royal Tce
Built in the 1870s by prominent businessman, community leader and one-time Dunedin mayor Keith Ramsay (1844-1906). Named Alyth after Ramsay’s birth place, the house was completed, at the latest, by March 1875. Architect: Robert Arthur Lawson (1833-1902).

Read more + Photos

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It doesn’t have to be a mansion located on the high streets….

crabapple-cottage-otago-peninsula-thecuriouskiwi-co-nzCrabapple Cottage, Otago Peninsula [thecuriouskiwi.co.nz]

Lastly, a THOROUGHLY USEFUL guide for those unfamiliar with historic heritage archives, technical sources and search methods.

### ODT Online Fri, 30 Dec 2016
What is your house hiding?
By Kim Dungey
Enjoyed this week’s Streets of Gold series, in which we have profiled various Dunedin houses of historic significance? Fancy playing detective and tracing the history of your home? … In recent years, Heritage New Zealand has run “how to research your home” workshops in Dunedin, Invercargill, Oamaru and Central Otago. The popular seminars have drawn together the sources it uses every day to tell the story of historic places. Archivists say some people want to restore their homes to their original states, are curious about former owners or simply want to know the age of their houses for insurance purposes. Others require archaeological assessments of pre-1901 properties or have reported seeing ghosts in their homes and wanted to work out who they might be. Interested homeowners have a wealth of resources at their fingertips….
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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OPINIONS : Otago Southland regional tourism

– Southland regional strategy pumps for another 10,000 residents
– Central Otago looking at healthy linkages – Chinese gold mining trail
– Queenstown Lakes means ‘business’, flourishing! [infrastructure demands]
– Quelle surprise, Dunedin City Council criticised on visitor strategy (what tourism plan ?)….

Broadcast from RNZ’s Dunedin studio
### radionz.co.nz 5 Jan 2017 at 5:12 pm
Outspoken: The Future of the Deep South Link
In this Outspoken, a panel chaired by RNZ’s Otago/Southland reporter, Ian Telfer, looks at the deep south of the country – what is the future for the country’s most southern region and how successful is the push to get more people to shift there?
Audio | Download: Ogg MP3 (27′22″)

● Virginia Nicholls, CEO, Otago Southland Employers Association
● Norcombe Barker, Director of Larnach Castle, tourism leader and board member of Dunedin Host
● Tim Cadogan, Mayor of Central Otago (speaking by phone)

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Just a tiny amount of what we know, from the Interior, in no geographical order whatsoever…. click on photo for source or go to Comments for credits.

queenstown-airport-day-aerial-photo-queenstown-airportss-earnslaw-engine-room-realjourneys-co-nzss-earnslaw-engine-room-real-journeys-shuttlerock-cdn-comcromwell-uniquelynz-comthe-nevis-bungy-aj-hackett-bungy-new-zealand-bungy-co-nzgrays-mining-earnscleugh-infomine-comabandoned-farm-homestead-becks-by-shellie-evans-flyingkiwigirl-at-flickr-comvulcan-hotel-aatravel-co-nzblue-lake-st-bathans-by-mclennan-outsideonline-comhayes-engineering-works-homestead-dbijapkm3o6fj-cloudfront-nethayes-engineering-shed-interior-otagocentralrail-trail-co-nzhayes-engineering-at-night-oturehua-by-simon-east-heritage-org-nzgibbston-central-otago-valli-vineyard-winetoursnz-comqueenstown-queenstownnz-co-nzqueenstown-the-mall-powderhounds-comskippers-canyon-adventurestoday-orgqueenstown-canyoning-canyoning-co-nzqueenstown-white-water-rafting-somekindofwanderlust-comclyde-dam-nzgeo-comdrybread-cemetery-omakau-otagocentralrailtrail-co-nzhyde-central-otago-talltalestravelblog-files-wordpress-compoolburn-viaduct-otago-central-rail-trail-by-m-hammel-ibike-dkqueenstown-par-3-in-the-sky-helicopter-golf-twistedsifter-files-wordpress-comthe-hills-clubhouse1-thehills-co-nzthe-hills-clubhouse-architect-pattersons-comhydro-attack-trover-queenstown-trover-comss-earnslaw-airnz-comair-new-zealand-queenstown-legacypartners-co-nz

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Aramoana Pilot Wharf Restoration

picnickers-spit-wharf-3-april-1918[Aramoana League]

John Davis, secretary, Aramoana League Inc.
Excerpt from letter dated 25 July 2012:
(To Whom It May Concern)

“….The current Pilot’s Wharf, built around 1900, was first recorded as a landing stage in the early 1800s. It played a part in the construction of the Aramoana Mole which started in 1884. The wharf has been allowed to become run down over the years as various authorities involved have shuffled their responsibilities and failed to provide the routine maintenance required.

Since 1989, when the Otago Harbour Board was abolished, as part of local authority reform, recreational and non-commercial wharf structures were passed to the DCC. The DCC state they were unaware they owned the Pilot’s Wharf; hence it has not been maintained since that date – 23 years of neglect. Having now determined they are the owners they want to demolish it!”

█ For more information and the full letter, go to DCC report:
The Aramoana League’s Draft Proposal to Restore the Former Aramoana Pilots Wharf (13 October 2014).

Aramoana and Pilots Wharf Location
(also known as Spit Wharf, Spit Jetty and Aramoana Wharf)

[click to enlarge]
dcc-webmap-aramoana-township-and-wharf-janfeb-2013-wharf-location-arroweddcc-webmap-aramoana-wharf-janfeb-2013-arrowed-locationdcc-webmap-aramoana-wharf-janfeb-2013-sitedcc-webmap-aramoana-wharf-janfeb-2013-detailDCC Webmaps – Aramoana township and Pilots Wharf JanFeb 2016

pilots-wharf-aramoana-league-dcc-report-13-10-14[Aramoana League]

### ODT Online Sat, 17 Dec 2016
Tow-boat turned back
Contact: Shawn McAvinue, ODT
A Dunedin City Council contractor has been replaced after a botched attempt to get a digger to Aramoana wharf. Maritime NZ Southern compliance manager Michael Vredenburg said concerns were raised when an uncertified vessel was used in an attempt to tow a barge carrying a digger to Aramoana wharf on Thursday. […] DCC staff are working with alternative contractors that have the appropriate Maritime New Zealand certification.
Read more

Channel 39 Published on Dec 15, 2016
Wharf demolition delayed
The restoration of the Aramoana Pilot Wharf was delayed yesterday after a barge ran aground in Waipuna bay.

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“It’s been a long battle but the trust is committed to the goal of seeing it fully restored for future generations.” –Tracey Densem

### ODT Online Fri, 16 Dec 2016
Wharf demolition delayed
By Shawn McAvinue
Nature granted the Aramoana wharf a day’s reprieve from demolition. Dunedin City Council parks and recreation acting group manager Tom Dyer said demolition work on the wharf was put off yesterday and contractors hoped to start today. “High winds prevented the barge, which is needed as a base for the removal operation, from being installed alongside the wharf.”
Read more

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UNFORGIVEABLE DCC

At a council meeting on Monday, council staff agreed to work with the trust on the wharf restoration. The “hasty” council staff told the trust members about the planned demolition on Tuesday.

### ODT Online Thu, 15 Dec 2016
Trust disappointed over wharf demolition
By Shawn McAvinue
The demolition of the Aramoana wharf starts today to the “disappointment and surprise” of the trust aiming to restore it. Dunedin City Council recreation planning and facilities manager Jendi Paterson said the first part of the work involved separating the main portion of the wharf structure and walkway from the beach. “We are doing this to ensure there is every chance the walkway can be salvaged as per the wishes of the [Aramoana Pilot Wharf Restoration Charitable Trust].”
Read more

Trust member Tracey Densem said the wharf demolition was “devastating”. The wharf had heritage value and should be repaired in its present location, she said. […] “It’s an unrealistic timeline for the trust to work to – it’s hardly an example of a positive council-community partnership.”

DCC Report: Aramoana Wharf Removal (12.12.16)
Department: Parks and Recreation
Structural condition and risk assessment : MWH
Photographic assessment : MWH

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### channel39.co.nz June 9, 2015 – 6:43pm
Historic wharf to be restored
A forgotten civic asset is due to be restored, thanks to the gumption of a local community group. The Aramoana League has support from the city council to revive a recreational wharf. And that’ll ensure a historic link is maintained. 
Video

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### channel39.co.nz October 14, 2014 – 7:00pm
Aramoana wharf restoration gets a vote of support
It’s good news for the Aramoana League, which has long fought for the restoration of the Aramoana wharf. The Dunedin City Council’s community and environment committee has voted to support the project. That means the council will likely spend several thousand dollars on wharf assessments, and take over its future maintenance.
Video

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Calvin Oaten
October 14, 2014 at 3:22 pm
Just a few dollars for the archaeological assessment says Dave Cull and 13 of his councillors. This so the project can move on to the next stage. That, I believe will be the raising of the $100,000 expected to cost for the reinstatement of the Aramoana wharf. What? That is not a wharf, it is a jetty, which has no practical use ever since the days when it served as an embarkation point for harbour pilots to meet incoming ships, and to service the light at the end of the spit. I venture to suggest that 98% of our population are unaware of its existence. The fundraising will founder, the DCC money spent will be wasted, lest it comes up with the shortfall and completes the job. Then what? Nobody will use it except the very odd curious ‘boatie’. Another dopey waste of money which the council doesn’t have. Dave Cull just doesn’t get it, the town is broke. The thirteen are no better, only Cr Vandervis has the sense to know a ‘purple pig’ when he sees it.

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### ODT Online Tue, 14 Oct 2014
DCC backs restoring Aramoana wharf
By Debbie Porteous
The Dunedin City Council has indicated its support for a community project to restore the Aramoana wharf. It has also agreed to pay for an archaeological assessment of the wharf so the project can move on to the next stage, and a heritage impact assessment, if necessary, after that.
Read more

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### ODT Online Mon, 13 Oct 2014
Vision to recycle wharf
By Debbie Porteous
….Efforts by the Aramoana League to restore the 105-year-old 22m-long wharf continue on a new track after it acknowledged little of the structure could be retained, given its state of deterioration. The league is now working on a project to build a 10m wharf, using as much of the existing material as possible.
Read more

To be tabled at the DCC Community and Environment Committee meeting today:

Report – CEC – 13/10/2014 (PDF, 4.5 MB)
The Aramoana League’s Draft Proposal to Restore the Former Aramoana Pilots Wharf

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

17 Comments

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Green Island town centre : Say No to Council Red Tape

Green Island is a revitalising service centre peppered with new tenancies and *excellent* eateries. All in all a worthwhile destination. Just make sure, Green Island people, that DCC does not overtake your ideas with theirs (see King Edward St, South Dunedin, where council blight has occurred)…. so to kill your lovely Upbeat shopping centre. YOUR Plan, not theirs. Don’t let councils over-design your main street (avoid road engineering aesthetics) —keep everything simple and spontaneous, a People-friendly Place to entice repeat visitors.

green-island-shops-google-street-view-tweaked-by-whatifdunedin-1

A plan to improve traffic flow, intersections, parking, pedestrian safety and bus stops is being developed in Green Island, with community input.

### ODT Online Sun, 27 Nov 2016
Traffic plan for perusal soon
By Joshua Riddiford – The Star
A traffic plan for Green Island is expected to be presented to officials before Christmas Day. The plan is intended to improve traffic flow, intersections, parking, pedestrian safety and bus stops. The Greater Green Island Community Network developed the plan in response to that organisation’s household survey in May, which found 30% of residents were concerned about vehicles dominating public spaces and streets, 21% were concerned about the amount of traffic and 21% were concerned about pedestrian safety.
Read more

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### ODT Online Sun, 13 Nov 2016
Green Island traffic plan picks up pace
By Brenda Harwood – The Star
….Greater Green Island believes the time has come for a comprehensive plan, with the recent development of the new Moyles Fresh Choice supermarket, the Z petrol station, the Sunnyvale Sports Centre, a growing population and the rise in traffic volumes. Greater Green Island community workers Amanda Reid and Leanne Stenhouse have been meeting  Dunedin City Council and Otago Regional Council representatives to discuss the issues and are now working on a comprehensive draft design for improvements …. [DCC transportation safety team leader Hjarne Poulsen] said the approach of the community network, to gather feedback and create a concept, was “very helpful” …. [ORC support services manager] Gerard Collings welcomed the community feedback and thanked the network for its “collaborative approach”.
Read more

[click to enlarge]
google-street-map-green-island-2016Google Street Map – Green Island 2016

dcc-webmap-green-island-town-centre-janfeb2013DCC Webmap – Green Island JanFeb 2013

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: Green Island street perspective via Google Street View, tweaked by whatifdunedin

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Roy Miller, NZ stained glass artist #biography #inspiration

*All images and accompanying texts by Brian Miller [promotion]

roy-miller-mt-cook-with-figure-sewing-seed-by-brian-miller-detail-11890994_911731092253708_6070668448044356513_n

“St John’s church in the attractive little town of Pleasant Point, South Canterbury, has a window of a man sowing seed beneath Mt Cook. Designed by K Bunton, executed by Roy Miller.”

roy-miller-daisies-by-brian-miller-detail-11891061_912412288852255_1646043659992482757_n

“In a valley near Geraldine at Raincliff, New Zealand, is a tiny church with a beautiful abstract window of native NZ flowers. Designed by Kenneth Bunton, and executed by Roy Miller.”

roy-miller-sheep-by-brian-mioller-11953056_915934751833342_1298773690406499181_n

“Naseby is a sleepy little Gold mine town nestled in a forest in Otago, New Zealand. There you will find St Georges Church with beautiful stained glass inside. It contains a pair of windows designed by Kenneth Bunton and executed by Roy Miller – with one of the best sheep I have seen in my travels.”

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“There is a tiny church at Manutahi on the edge of Mt Taranaki which only has one service a year – but inside is the most beautiful window of the mountain – took my breath away when I saw it.”

A new book aims to shine a light on Dunedin stained-glass maestro Roy Miller. He came from a family boasting a history of artists and artisans. Roy’s (and Ralph’s) grandfather, Henry Miller, was a master coachbuilder whose hansom cabs won several championship awards at the Melbourne Exhibition. Their father, Oswell, established Dunedin signwriting firm O. G. Miller in 1913; it became Miller Studios in 1958, then in 2016 was rebranded Miller Creative Group. –ODT

capturing-light-full-cover-proof2-1web-lifelogs-co-nz### ODT Online Mon, 31 Oct 2016
Colour and light
By Shane Gilchrist
Amid the various refractions of memory, as shards of one scene are overlaid on another, Brian Miller recalls a childhood image of a stained-glass kiln out the back of Dunedin signwriting firm Miller Studios. He also pictures his Uncle Roy holding pieces of glass up against the light before cutting curves with the confidence of a master. Thankfully, Roy Miller’s work is a tangible thing. New Zealand’s leading stained glass artist from the 1950s until his death in 1981, Miller produced more than 330 windows, in about 100 churches around New Zealand. Brian details Miller’s legacy in Capturing Light: Roy Miller – New Zealand Stained Glass Artist, which offers an insight not only into the life and work of his uncle but also provides a history of the art of stained glass, both in New Zealand and internationally, as well as an overview of early Dunedin stained-glass artists. In short, it’s a celebration of artistic inspiration and the artisan skills required to, as the title says, capture light. The book also contains plenty of information on techniques for conserving historic stained glass artworks, all of which provides an inherent warning: that many such works are in danger of degradation.
Read more

ODT: Looking at a stained glass window …

THE BOOK
Capturing Light: Roy Miller – New Zealand Stained Glass Artist
Published by Lifelogs Ltd ($69.99)
More information about Roy Miller and the history of stained glass:
Website https://roymiller.co.nz | Facebook Capturing Light

The publishers Brian and Diane Miller have an extensive background in bookselling, writing, publishing and photography. They operated Tapui Children’s Books for over twenty years before venturing into their own publishing business Lifelogs Ltd.

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

1 Comment

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Dunedin, Heritage, Housing, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Public interest, Tourism

Carroll St house fire #historicheritage

Tyler Christmas Published on Oct 22, 2016
Dunedin Carroll St fire 2016 [full footage]

my heart gose out to them all
out safe and fire is under control
–Tyler

Firefighters could not tell whether the smoke alarms in the flat were working because it was so badly damaged, but the neighbouring flat did have working alarms.

### ODT Online Sun, 23 Oct 2016
Woman jumps from burning flat
By Vaughan Elder
A woman had to jump for her life from the second storey of a Dunedin flat as it became engulfed with flames. Five fire appliances were called to the blaze, which started just before noon on Sunday, and “totally destroyed” the Carroll St flat as about 100 onlookers gathered on the street. Senior Station Officer Justin Wafer, of Dunedin Central, said a woman, had to jump from the second storey as flames engulfed the flat in what he called a “significant structure fire”. A man, believed to be the woman’s partner, was on the ground floor when the blaze started and was among three people who caught her after she jumped. […] Mr Wafer praised the actions of those who caught her as “very brave”.
Read more

Smoke-Alarms-Banner [fire.org.nz]

NEW ZEALAND FIRE SERVICE
We recommend you install long-life photoelectric type smoke alarms in your home. They may cost a little more but the benefits are significant.
• They provide a about 10 years smoke detection.
• They remove the frustration of fixing the ‘flat battery beep’ at inconvenient times such as at 3 in the morning.
• The cost of replacement batteries for standard alarms means the long-life one effectively pays for itself over its lifetime.
• You don’t have to climb ladders every year to replace batteries.

Your best protection is to have photoelectric smoke alarms in every bedroom, living area and hallway in your home. Install them in the middle of the ceiling of each room.

But, at a minimum, you should install one standard long-life photoelectric type alarm in the hallway closest to the bedrooms.

NZFS : Make Your Home and Family Fire Safe Brochure

NZFS : More on smoke alarm installation

Related Post and Comments:
15.5.16 Fire Safety at Home : Install long-life photoelectric alarms #bestprotection

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

3 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Design, Dunedin, Education, Events, Fire and Emergency NZ, Heritage, Housing, Media, New Zealand, People, Property, Public interest, Site

Battle of the hotels : DCC meat in the sandwich (unedifying)

proposed-hotel-via-facebook-odt-filesCr Hilary Calvert emailed the following questions to senior council officers on Sunday, 16 September 2016 at 1:20 p.m., with regards to the DCC-owned parking area in Filleul St, proposed as the site for a new privately developed hotel.

[Staff names have been removed. -Eds]

Enterprise Dunedin provides part reply on Friday, 7 October 2016, at 5:03 p.m.

Q: How many car parks will be lost if this project goes ahead, and what would be the loss of revenue to the DCC?

A: The number of car parks that may be lost cannot be accurately determined at this point in time. The next stage in the project following the due diligence period will provide that level of detailed information.

Q: What development contribution and/or rates relief was provided on the Chief Post Office site, in total, for that site?

A: Enterprise Dunedin does not have this information. I will forward the request to Finance for them to respond.

Q: How many first class beds are we short of in Dunedin according to your information? Does the industry agree with your assessment of what we are short of?

A: In the 2012 evidence for the Resource Consent Application for Betterways Ltd, Stephen Hamilton’s (Horwath Asia Pacific Ltd) ‘Market Gap Report’ indicated “the need for an internationally branded 5 star hotel and another 4 star plus hotel for Dunedin to remain competitive with Tier 1 and Top Tier 2 destinations is 150-250 rooms”.

No reply has been received, we understand, for this fourth question which was directed to another senior council officer:

Q: What is the number of parks we will be losing as a result of … likely central city changes such as bus hub and cycleways, in the vicinity of the central city within the range of those who would park and walk to their work close to the Filleul St site (maybe Moray Place south, Princes St and George St to the outer end of the Golden Block, seaward to the far side of Cumberland)?

dcc-webmap-filleul-st-parking-area-shaded-1DCC Webmap – Filleul St council-owned parking area (shaded)

Furthermore, after noting public concerns about the loss of car parks, an OIA request by Hilary Calvert was submitted to Sandy Graham, Group Manager Corporate Services, on Friday, 14 October 2016 at 10:28 a.m.

Re: OIA Parks new hotel [Filleul Street]
Q: Would it be possible to get information from [City Property] about how many parks there are on this property and any affected by the sale i.e. any contiguous property on which DCC has parks.

Reply is pending.

****

BELATED NEWS—
Mr Tosswill (NZ Horizon Hospitality Group Ltd – incorporated 20 Jan 2016) has some competition, as does DCC on what it knows or chooses not to reveal……

There’s only ONE WINNER, it’s not likely to be DCC.
Market research shows Mrs Hagaman is quite correct.

“Ratepayers need to know the region’s five-star market is very small.”
–Lani Hagaman, Scenic Circle

### ODT Online Sat, 15 Oct 2016
Five-star hotel planned; site, height unclear
By Dene Mackenzie
The Scenic Circle Group is planning a five-star hotel in Dunedin but the company will not reveal where it will build the $34 million 120-room hotel, or its height. The hotel would have restaurants, bars, conference rooms and a luxury day spa. The hotel group, owned by Earl and Lani Hagaman, has owned and operated the 178-room, 4.5-star Dunedin Scenic Hotel Southern Cross since 1984 and, in 2003, built the 121-room four-star Scenic Hotel Dunedin City. […] Mrs Hagaman yesterday  launched stinging criticism of the council and its involvement with Mr Tosswill. She said she advised the council about Scenic’s plans for a five-star property more than three months ago and was surprised the council entered into an exclusive deal with another developer.
Read more

dcc-webmap-scenic-circle-group-princes-high-broadway-rattray-sts-shaded-1DCC Webmap – Scenic Circle / Hagaman properties (shaded), The Exchange

Related Posts and Comments:
● 5.10.16 Dunedin bauble #votecatcher
● 4.10.16 The Demon Duck freak show of partial ‘Civic’ information! Before voting closes! #Dunedin
11.1.16 Un hôtel. Dunedin.
19.8.15 Hotels ? Business ? [DCC lost +++152 fleet vehicles] —Cull in charge of building chicken coops, why ?
1.4.14 HOTEL Town Hall… Another investment group, Daaave’s pals from the communist state?

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

24 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Enterprise Dunedin, Finance, Geography, Heritage, Hotel, Infrastructure, Media, Name, New Zealand, OAG, Ombudsman, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Urban design, What stadium

Vogel Street Party 2016 #randoms

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On Saturday, the Vogel Street Party hit the streets of the Warehouse Precinct. Now in its third year, the party continues the celebration of Dunedin’s successes by highlighting CONNECTIONS — celebrating the links that bring our Dunedin communities together with the rest of the world, as well as each other. Our gigatown status means we can showcase the creative arts, fashion, music, drama, interactive activities, innovation and development across the city.

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Sat, 8 Oct 2016
ODT: Thousands flock to Vogel St Party
A crowd of more than 15,000 took in the sights of Dunedin’s heritage gem during the Vogel St Party today. Vogel St Party Charitable Trust chairman Brendan Christie said the party was “great”.

Post and still images by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

9 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Coolness, DCC, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Events, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Infrastructure, Innovation, Inspiration, Leading edge, New Zealand, People, Pics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

The Demon Duck freak show of partial ‘Civic’ information! Before voting closes! #Dunedin

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Two instances in two days [Voting closes on Saturday 8 October] of partial information. Really, this means NO INFORMATION at all. Or at best something Tall, the Recipe for FURTHER IRRITATION. Said Ratepayers who’ve seen quite enough of Cull Council fluff.

Be quite sure of that. The future is cracked quacked.

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No. 1
Yesterday, Dunedin City Holdings Ltd (DCHL) failed to present its Audit Report to the last sitting of the Cull Council. NO AUDIT REPORT. Is there an Audit Report or not, they asked, or is this a process blip with everything under ‘good’ control. Well, some forms of control are the hedge to unwelcome news —before it comes! Again, WHY is the DCHL Audit Report (because it most certainly exists in some form or other) late ENOUGH, TO MISS tabling at Council BEFORE the elections.

THE ELECTIONS. Leaving the new Council to deal to BAD SCRATCHY items from Crombie’s Cookie Jar, about the Gremlins and Duck Itch within, and indeed, the pending wrath of Audit New Zealand (A Gain again!) and Dunedin Ratepayers (A Gain again!).

Was it that the stadium company, one in particular, could upset Ratepayers before they vote. Just one amongst the growing frequency and severity of storms over South Dunedin. DCHL, the ONE STORM too many.

No. 2
A sort of desperate hotel proposal for the Council-owned Filleul St car park. An election freebie in message, carpet fibre thrown over an unravelling pongy DEAD DUCK (political massage). The accommodation market is trending nationally and internationally to Boutique hotels not a CLUNKER. Five star in the New Zealand visitor markets no longer looks or smells this way. [see ODT horreur graphic —So yesterday’s two star, they said]

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Let’s hope Chris Morris is asking the owners of Kingsgate Hotel Dunedin, Distinction Dunedin Hotel and the Scenic Circle hotels what they’re thinking about DCC’s plans, and the offer of friable ‘red carpet’ to a private hotel operator who plans a bulwark. Which it’s thought will FALL OVER. The MOU between the Council and the developer has been about a while – we wondered when this glorious axe axiom of accommodation might sling into sight for the central city.

THE ELECTIONS. So Mr Cull’s publicity machine for re-election has left the room at South Dunedin and DUCK SHOVED bang up close to the Dunedin Town Hall, Public Library and Civic Centre – like Real Business is going on. Let’s hasten to suppose Enterprise Dunedin is to thank for all this in some small way.

worried-daffy-duck-giphy-comWaiting for the final Vote Count (“no stars”)

“JUST TO HAND”
█ Released via LGOIMA:

19 September 2016
EXTRACT FROM THE NON-PUBLIC MINUTES OF THE COUNCIL MEETING HELD ON 19 SEPTEMBER 2016

C5 PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT OF DCC OWNED CENTRAL CITY SITE

A report from Management and Enterprise Dunedin sought approval for an exclusive six month due diligence period to NZ Horizon Hospitality Group Limited (NZH) for the sale of the Council owned property on the corner of Moray Place and Filleul Street. As part of the due diligence, Council would undertake geotechnical investigations, estimated at $100,000, and provide this to NZH.

NZH was proposing to develop part of the site as a five star hotel, with purchase of the land conditional on development contribution relief of up to $1 million. The purchase would be at market value and require development within a specified timeframe.

There would be no obligation on Council to enter into a sale and purchase agreement for the site either during or after the exclusive period.

The Chief Executive Officer and staff responded to questions from Councillors.

Moved (Cr Chris Staynes/Cr Andrew Noone):

That the Council:

a) Approves a Memorandum of Understanding with NZ Horizon Hospitality Group Limited for a three month exclusive due diligence period for the purposes of determining the viability of a five star hotel development on the property on the corner of Moray Place and Filleul Street.

b) Notes under the Memorandum of Understanding:
a. Council agrees to:
i. Not enter into any discussions or negotiations with any other party other than NZ Horizon Hospitality Group relating to the sale and purchase of the property.
ii. Undertake geotechnical investigations required that will be provided to the NZ Hospitality Group.
b. NZ Hospitality Group agrees to:
i. Undertake due diligence relating to the purchase of the property at Moray Place and Filleul for the development of a five star hotel.

c) Notes that should the due diligence confirm the viability of the proposed five star hotel development, Council and NZ Horizon Hospitality Group Limited may negotiate a sale and purchase agreement conditional on:
a. The sale of the land at market value; and
b. Up to $1 million in development contributions relief; and
c. Development timeframes; and
d. Full Council approval.

d) Delegates the Chief Executive Officer as the Council’s spokesperson for the purposes of any media about the due diligence process.

e) Notes that the approval of the Memorandum of Understanding is not to be taken as any predetermined Council position on any future sale and purchase, or conditions in a sale and purchase agreement, and specifically that Council has yet to consider any development contributions remission and would do against the Development Contributions Policy should a sale and purchase agreement be pursued.

f) Directs that staff use the three month exclusive period to examine other uses and options for the site, in the context of the city’s Strategic Framework and Central City Plan, and that they be put to the Council at the same time as they consider any sale and purchase agreement from the developer.

Division
Voting was carried out by division.

For: Crs Dave Cull, Chris Staynes, David Benson-Pope, Doug Hall, Aaron Hawkins, Mike Lord, Jinty MacTavish, Andrew Noone, Neville Peat, Lee Vandervis, Andrew Whiley and Kate Wilson (12).

Against: Nil

The division was declared CARRIED by 12 votes to 0.

Motion carried (CNL/2016/134)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

*Images: With thanks to Daffy Duck from The Looney Tunes Show via (from top) thepinksmoke.com, fanpop.com, toonbarn.com and giphy.com

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Filed under Baloney, Business, Democracy, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Finance, Geography, Heritage, Hot air, Media, New Zealand, OAG, People, Perversion, Politics, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Travesty, What stadium