DCC & ORC Electoral Officer on Voting

### channel39.co.nz Wed, 22 Aug 2016
Nightly Interview: Pam Jordan
Most residents should have received their local body elections voting packs in the mail by now. Tonight we’re joined by Dunedin City Council and Otago Regional Council electoral officer Pam Jordan, who’s going to explain the ins and outs of voting.

Channel 39 Published on Sep 21, 2016

█ Check out election candidates’ names and profiles here:

DCC & Community Boards
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/electoral-information/elections-to-be-held-and-nominations-dunedin-city-council

ORC
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/electoral-information/elections-to-be-held-and-nominations-orc

On the STV voting system
Go to this post and comments to read more about STV – note comments by STV advocate Steve [Stephen Todd of Wellington]:

26.8.10 In defence of STV

█ For more, enter the term *candidate* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

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3 Comments

Filed under DCC, Democracy, Dunedin, Media, Name, ORC, People, Politics, Public interest

3 responses to “DCC & ORC Electoral Officer on Voting

  1. Elizabeth

    University of Otago Associate Prof Janine Hayward says under the single transferable vote system candidates needed just 6.6% of the vote to win one of 14 council seats.

    Sat, 17 Sep 2016
    Just 6% needed to win seat
    ….Candidates needed just over 6% of the vote, which would not disadvantage those who had strong local support within a limited community, she said. […] Prof Hayward’s advice for people filling in their voting papers was not to rank people they did not want to see elected.
    “I always say to people only rank the candidates you want to help elect. So if there are only three, rank three; if there are 20, rank 20. If you do only rank three, you minimise the chance you’re going to help elect somebody, because at some point your vote won’t transfer any further. If there’s not a fourth person you would vote for, don’t rank them, because when you rank people, you’re helping get them elected.”

    ****

    How can you use your vote to not only help elect candidates you like, but also keep out those you really don’t?  Prof Andrew Geddis explains.

    Wed, 21 Sep 2016
    STV voting strategy for candidates you dislike
    OPINION Associate Prof Janine Hayward gave the following advice to voters in Dunedin’s council elections (ODT, 17.9.16): “I always say to people only rank the candidates you want to help elect. So if there are three, rank three; if there are 20, rank 20.” That’s perfectly fine, if all you want to do is elect the candidates you like. Ranking those candidates that you positively approve of does as much as you can to ensure that they will be successful. […] But what if, like me, you don’t just want to help elect the candidates that you like? What if, like me, there are some candidates running who you really don’t want to see on the council?

  2. Peter

    You can’t second guess how your voting score sheet will land. Personally, I wouldn’t vote for anyone further down the ‘least preferred’ list, whom I didn’t really want on council, because I didn’t want someone else even less. I agree with Janine Hayward. Only vote for your preferred candidates in order.

  3. I voted already and posted my vote. I just voted for Lee Vandervis and no one else so that my vote would go to him FPP style!

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