Dame Zaha Hadid 1950 – 2016

Zaha Hadid by Philip Sinden (1)

Zaha Hadid by Mary McCartney [dezeen.com] 1

31 March 2016 | Miami
The acclaimed Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid, the first female winner of the top Pritzker Architecture Prize, has died at the age of 65. Born in Baghdad in October 31, 1950, Hadid first studied mathematics at the American University in Lebanon, before pursuing architecture at the Architectural Association in London in 1972. In 1979, she established her own practice in London, the Zaha Hadid Architects.

Last year it was announced that British architect Zaha Hadid was to become the 2016 recipient of the Royal Gold Medal for architecture, marking the first time a woman has won the prize in her own right. Awarded by the Royal Institute of British Architects, the medal is presented annually in recognition of a significant contribution to the profession. Hadid is the first women without a male partner to win the award in its 167-year history. Hadid said she was proud to be the first woman to receive the honour in her own right. “We now see more established female architects all the time. That doesn’t mean it’s easy,” she said.

Necessarily having to disperse effort through a studio production, rather than being a lone artist, she cottoned on to the potential of the computer to turn space upon itself. So Zaha with her mathematics background seized upon this, she has been smart enough to pull in some formidable computational talent without being phased by its ways. Meanwhile, with paintings and special small drawings Zaha continued to lead from the front. Read more at Dezeen

Rosey Chan Published on Sep 28, 2013
“Parametricism” by Patrik Schumacher – Zaha Hadid Architects – AADRL
Music by Rosey Chan – entirely recorded on acoustic piano + prepared piano

Dezeen Published on Dec 2, 2015
Zaha Hadid unveils prefabricated Volu dining pavilion at Design Miami
Architects Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher have designed a dining pavilion shaped like an open clam shell.

Zaha Hadid Architects http://www.zaha-hadid.com
An international architecture and design firm founded by Zaha Hadid, with its main office situated in Clerkenwell, London. We work at all scales and in all sectors. We create transformative cultural, corporate, residential and other spaces that work in synchronicity with their surroundings.
950 projects 44 countries 400 staff 55 nations | About us 1 year ago

Architecture Today Published on Mar 21, 2016
Library and Learning Center – Campus WU / Zaha Hadid Architects
Project Development and Structural Engineering: Vasko + Partner Ingenieure (Vienna). Video by Damir Kovačić, for the video exhibition series Austrian Architecture Today. Music: The Jazz Piano – Artist: Ben Sound

ArchiveTecture Published on Oct 27, 2015
Abu Dhabi Performing Arts Centre by Zaha Hadid
A new performing arts centre housing five theatres, music hall, concert hall and opera house – conceived as a sculptural form, emerging naturally from the intersection of pedestrian pathways within a new cultural district – a growing organism that spreads through successive branches which form the structure like ‘fruits on the vine’.

SOHO China Published on Oct 8, 2014
The Story of Wangjing SOHO: Exclusive Dialogue with Zhang Xin and Zaha Hadid
SOHO China’s Wangjing SOHO, designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect Dame Zaha Hadid opened 20 September 2014, with over 20,000 visitors to Beijing’s newest architectural landmark. In a live dialogue, SOHO China CEO Zhang Xin interviews Pritzker-winning architect Dame Zaha Hadid to uncover the inspiration her design language.

SOHO China Published on May 27, 2014
Musical Interlude at Wangjing SOHO 望京SOHO水景巅峰之境
This video highlights the spectacular water features and landscape design of one of Beijing’s newest landmark architectures. Wangjing SOHO, designed by world-renowned architect Zaha Hadid, covers an area of 115,392 sq metres with a total construction area of 521,265 sq metres, and is comprised of three highrise mixed-use office and commercial buildings, and three lowrise commercial buildings, the tallest tower having a height of 200 metres. Upon completion of construction in 2014, Wangjing SOHO will be the first tall landmark architecture visible en route from the airport into the city.

ARk1T3CH Published on Jan 2, 2014
Who Dares Wins • Zaha Hadid
BBC Scotland [2013] – Español CC (duration 1:10:39)
█ [profile interview and backstory]

Dezeen Published on Aug 14, 2015
Zaha Hadid wins contest for landmark bridge across Taipei’s Tamsui River
This animation by MIR and Morean shows Zaha Hadid Architects’ proposal for a 920-metre-long bridge across the mouth of the Tamsui River in the Taiwanese capital. Billed as “the world’s largest asymmetric cable-stayed bridge with a single tower”, the Danjiang Bridge will be supported by just one 175-metre-high concrete mast to reduce its visual impact on the Taipei skyline. Its steel deck will create a new route for cars, trains and pedestrians, easing congestion on existing transport networks. Zaha Hadid Architects – which has previously completed bridges in Spain and Abu Dhabi – is partnering with engineer Sinotech Engineering Consultants and master builder Leonhardt, Andrä & Partner on the project. Read more at Dezeen

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Portraits: Zaha Hadid – Philip Sinden | Mary McCartney

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5 responses to “Dame Zaha Hadid 1950 – 2016

  1. Liz A

    I dreamt of a Hadid building for Dunedin’s waterfront.

    • I dreamt there was a vast Concourse of talented artists of every field – from the Mediterranean, Latin America and Latin Europe, who settled in Dunedin. I don’t know why, it seemed a good idea in the Dali esque dream.

  2. Calvin Oaten

    Liz A, Perhaps if you made the right approach to the Otago Regional Council then it might well go for a ‘Hadid’ building. On reflection I think you ‘Had better not’.

  3. Elizabeth

    ### curbed.com • Mar 31, 2016, 11:39 AM
    Full Statement by Zaha Hadid Architects on Her Passing
    “Zaha: larger than life, bold as brass and certainly on the case.”
    By • Patrick Sisson

    This is the full statement released earlier today by Zaha Hadid Architects.

    It is with great sadness that Zaha Hadid Architects have confirmed that Dame Zaha Hadid, DBE died suddenly in Miami in the early hours of this morning. She had contracted bronchitis earlier this week and suffered a sudden heart attack while being treated in hospital.

    Zaha Hadid was widely regarded to be the greatest female architect in the world today. Born in Baghdad in 1950, she studied mathematics at the American University of Beirut before starting her architectural journey in 1972 at the Architectural Association in London.

    By 1979 she had established her own practice in London – Zaha Hadid Architects – garnering a reputation across the world for her ground-breaking theoretical works including The Peak in Hong Kong (1983), the Kurfürstendamm in Berlin (1986) and the Cardiff Bay Opera House in Wales (1994).

    Working with office partner Patrik Schumacher, her interest was in the interface between architecture, landscape, and geology; which her practice integrates with the use of innovative technologies often resulting in unexpected and dynamic architectural forms.

    Zaha Hadid’s first major built commission, one that affirmed her international recognition, was the Vitra Fire Station in Weil Am Rhein, Germany (1993); subsequent notable projects including the MAXXI: Italian National Museum of 21st Century Arts in Rome (2009), the London Aquatics Centre for the 2012 Olympic Games (2011) and the Heydar Aliyev Centre in Baku (2013) illustrate her quest for complex, fluid space. Buildings such as the Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art in Cincinnati (2003) and the Guangzhou Opera House in China (2010) have also been hailed as architecture that transforms our ideas of the future with visionary spatial concepts defined by advanced design, material and construction processes.

    In 2004, Zaha Hadid became the first woman to be awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize. She twice won the UK’s most prestigious architecture award, the RIBA Stirling Prize: in 2010 for the MAXXI Museum in Rome, a building for the staging of 21st century art, the distillation of years of experimentation, a mature piece of architecture conveying a calmness that belies the complexities of its form and organisation; and the Evelyn Grace Academy, a unique design, expertly inserted into an extremely tight site, that shows the students, staff and local residents they are valued and celebrates the school’s specialism throughout its fabric, with views of student participation at every turn.

    Zaha Hadid’s other awards included the Republic of France’s Commandeur de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, Japan’s Praemium Imperiale and in 2012, Zaha Hadid was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. She was made Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and Fellow of the American Institute of Architecture.

    She held various academic roles including the Kenzo Tange Chair at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University; the Sullivan Chair at the University of Illinois, School of Architecture. Hadid also taught studios at Columbia University, Yale University and the University of Applied Arts in Vienna.

    Zaha Hadid was recently awarded the RIBA’s 2016 Royal Gold Medal, the first woman to be awarded the prestigious honour in her own right. Sir Peter Cook wrote the following citation:

    “In our current culture of ticking every box, surely Zaha Hadid succeeds, since (to quote the Royal Gold Medal criteria) she is someone “who has made a significant contribution to the theory or practice of architecture…. for a substantial body of work rather than for work which is currently fashionable.” Indeed her work, though full of form, style and unstoppable mannerism, possesses a quality that some of us might refer to as an impeccable ‘eye’: which we would claim is a fundamental in the consideration of special architecture and is rarely satisfied by mere ‘fashion’.

    And surely her work is special. For three decades now, she has ventured where few would dare: if Paul Klee took a line for a walk, then Zaha took the surfaces that were driven by that line out for a virtual dance and then deftly folded them over and then took them out for a journey into space. In her earlier, ‘spiky’ period there was already a sense of vigour that she shared with her admired Russian Suprematists and Constructivists – attempting with them to capture that elusive dynamic of movement at the end of the machine age.

    Necessarily having to disperse effort through a studio production, rather than being a lone artist, she cottoned–on to the potential of the computer to turn space upon itself. Indeed there is an Urban Myth that suggests that the very early Apple Mac ‘boxes’ were still crude enough to plot the mathematically unlikely – and so Zaha with her mathematics background seized upon this and made those flying machine projections of the Hong Kong Peak project and the like. Meanwhile, with paintings and special small drawings Zaha continued to lead from the front. She has also been smart enough to pull in some formidable computational talent without being phased by its ways.

    Thus the evolution of the ‘flowing’ rather than spikey architecture crept up upon us in stages, as did the scale of her commissions, but in most cases, they remained clear in identity and control. When you entered the Fire Station at Vitra, you were conscious of being inside one of those early drawings and yes, it could be done. Yet at perhaps its highest, those of us lucky enough to see the Heydar Aliyev Center in Baku in the flesh, can surely never have been in such a dream-like space, with its totality, its enormous internal ramp and dart-like lights seeming to have come from a vocabulary that lies so far beyond the normal architecture that we assess or rationalize.

    So we are presenting her with this Medal as a British Institution: and as a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire: thus she might seem to be a member of our British Establishment. Yet in reality, many of our chattering classes and not a few fellow architects have treated her with characteristic faint praise, and when she heroically won the Cardiff Opera House competition, blocking the scheme. Or when we awarded her the RIBA Stirling Prize for the school in South London – her second win in a row – we, the jury, were loudly derided by a number of distinguished architects. Of course, in our culture of circumspection and modesty her work is certainly not modest, and she herself is the opposite of modest. Indeed her vociferous criticism of poor work or stupidity recalls the line-side comments of the tennis player John McEnroe. Yet this is surely characteristic of the seriousness with which she takes the whole business: sloppiness and waywardness pain her and she cannot play the comfy Continued British game of platitudinous waffle that is the preferred cushion adopted by many people of achievement or power. Her methods and perhaps much of her psychology remain Mesopotamian and not a little scary: but certainly clear.

    As a result, it is perhaps a little lonely there up at the top, surrounded now by some very considerable talent in the office, but feared somewhat and distanced from the young. Yet in private Zaha is gossipy and amusing, genuinely interested in the work of talented colleagues who do very different architecture such as Steven Holl, and she was the first to bring to London talent such as Lebbeus Woods or Stanley Saiotowitz. She is exceptionally loyal to her old friends: many of whom came from the Alvin Boyarsky period of the Architectural Association: which seems to remain as her comfort zone and golden period of friendship. Encouraged and promoted at an early age by Boyarsky, she has rewarded the AA with an unremitting loyalty and fondness for it.

    The history of the Gold Medal must surely include many major figures who commanded a big ship and one ponders upon the operation involved that gets such strong concepts as the MAXXI in Rome – in which the power of organization is so clear – or the Bergisel Ski Jump in Innsbruck where dynamic is at last captured – or the Aquatics Centre for the London Olympics where the lines diving boards were as fluid as the motion of the divers – made into reality. And she has done it time and time again in Vienna, Marseilles, Beijing and Guangzhou. Never has she been so prolific, so consistent. We realize that Kenzo Tange and Frank Lloyd Wright could not have drawn every line or checked every joint, yet Zaha shares with them the precious role of towering, distinctive and relentless influence upon all around her that sets the results apart from the norm. Such self-confidence is easily accepted in film-makers and football managers, but causes some architects to feel uncomfortable, maybe they’re secretly jealous of her unquestionable talent. Let’s face it, we might have awarded the medal to a worthy, comfortable character. We didn’t, we awarded it to Zaha: larger than life, bold as brass and certainly on the case.

    Our Heroine.

    How lucky we are to have her in London.”

    • Details of Zaha Hadid’s memorial service will be announced shortly.

    Curbed Link

    ****

    Zaha Hadid’s Legacy Takes Center Stage in Obituaries
    Apr 1, 2016, 1:17 PM

    Zaha Hadid Tributes Flood Social Media
    Mar 31, 2016, 1:30 PM [images]

    ### curbed.com • Mar 31, 2016, 4:47 PM
    Zaha Hadid, Visionary Architect Who Helped Design the Future
    The Iraqi-British Pritzker winner will be remembered for introducing daring curves and futuristic shapes to modern architecture
    By • Patrick Sisson

    ‘Having to fight hard has made me a better architect.’ — Zaha Hadid, The Times

    Who walks out of interviews? Well, for one, Dame Zaha Hadid. Taken as a singular instance, it’s unfair to introduce her spectacular career by alluding to the moment last fall when she walked out of a BBC radio interview due to the tone and tenor of a journalist’s questions. To those who already felt a certain way about her work, it crystallized her reputation as “diva”-like.

    Viewed with a wide-angle lens, however, the incident represents the challenges Hadid deftly handled throughout her celebrated, trailblazing career, and a degree of scrutiny not often leveled at her peers. As it turns out, the BBC issued a statement regretting the interviewer’s behavior and erroneous assumptions. And Hadid, as she had done throughout her career, dropped the mic, went back to work, and continued doing what visionaries do.

    Born in Baghdad on October 31, 1950, Zaha Hadid—who passed away in a Miami hospital due to a sudden heart attack during treatment for bronchitis—will be remembered for introducing daring curves and futuristic shapes to modern architecture. A prolific architect as well as an academic and teacher—she’s taught at Harvard, Yale, the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the Hochschule für bildende Künste Hamburg—her firm, Zaha Hadid Architects, currently employs roughly 400 workers in a converted schoolhouse in the Clerkenwell neighborhood of London.

    Hadid, who was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2012, says that her design career started due to her parents. During a trip to Beirut as a seven-year-old, she went to a furniture maker to pick up pieces for her room ordered by her father Mohammed, a “forward-thinking man with cosmopolitan interests.” The collection contained an asymmetrical mirror, which started her love affair with asymmetry. She was free to decorate her room, which happened to be in a Bauhaus-inspired home in Baghdad, as she wanted. Her cousin liked it, and asked her to design hers. Then, an aunt did the same thing. Ever since, the concepts and possibilities of space were Hadid’s driving concerns.

    Hadid has said growing up in Baghdad in the ‘50s and early ‘60s was inspirational, as it was a period of progress and nation-building. She moved to England in the 1960s to attend boarding school, but her heritage and homeland have always been instrumental influences; she told The Guardian that the landscape, the way the water, land, and buildings flowed together, was inspiring. She also explained how her background has led to backlash throughout her career:

    “Being an Arab woman and a modern architect certainly don’t exclude each other – when I was growing up in Iraq, there were many women architects. You cannot believe the enormous resistance I’ve faced just for being an Arab, and a woman on top of that. It is like a double-edged sword. The moment my woman-ness is accepted, the Arab-ness seems to become a problem.”
    Read more

  4. Elizabeth

    ### The Guardian Thu, 31 March 2016 23.21 BST
    Zaha Hadid’s 10 best buildings in pictures
    From the swooping space-age shopping mall to the Z-shaped school with a running track through it, here are the buildings that Zaha Hadid will be remembered for. With a short video, Zaha Hadid in her own words and designs.
    http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/mar/31/zaha-hadid-10-best-buildings-in-pictures

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