Daily Archives: January 3, 2013

Proposed 100m hotel: Damn right, the fight’s not over! #Dunedin

Great to see the letter by award-winning architect Richard Shackleton given prominence in the ODT today. It sent me hunting for my copy of Paul Goldberger’s book, The Skyscraper (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982), bought in second professional year (BArch) at Auckland. Given what has happened since to skyscraper design internationally, the book is a little quaint, eclectic and short of stature – it will always be a useful commentary on the emergence and history of towers in the United States.

Most of the buildings Goldberger cites I visited on architectural study tour with a group of staff, students and friends of the Auckland School in 1984, at the start of my four-year fulltime Master of Architecture degree (thesis only). But that’s quite another rainy day story of ‘commercial facades’.

Goldberger begins his last chapter, ‘Beyond the Box’, saying:
“By 1980, one thing was clear: the box, the rationalist dream of the International Style [the austere glass box, his words], was making more and more architects uncomfortable. Not only was it no longer the clean and exhilarating structure that would serve as a clarion call to a new age, but it was not even able to hold out much promise of practicality. It was generally inefficient from the standpoint of energy, and it was not as marketable from the viewpoint of real estate operators either.”

41 Wharf Street, Dunedin
For the applicant (Betterways Advisory Ltd), architect Jeremy Whelan of Ignite Architects (Auckland) is assisting Shanghai-based ECADI (Eastern China Architectural Design Institute), who were initially engaged by the client, with the conceptual design of the proposed hotel. It is claimed in Whelan’s brief of evidence that ECADI has significant international hotel experience and has completed projects for all major 5 star brand operators including Kempinski Hotels, Four Seasons Hotels, Marriot Hotels, Ritz Carlton Hotels and the Intercontinental Hotel Group.

The design of the 27-storey hotel tower crassly proposed for one of Dunedin’s best waterfront sites is the likes of which Goldberger correctly identifies as ‘tired’ by 1980 – at the time of writing, he hadn’t yet considered Arquitectonica’s work at Miami, Florida (see the landmark 20-storey luxury Atlantis condominiums built in 1982, famous for their cutout) – but Whelan certainly had, as a BArch contemporary of mine at Auckland School, and that building too is ‘tired’ as architectural metaphors and shared language go.

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ODT 3.1.13 Letter to the editor p12

ODT 3.1.13 Letter R Shackleton (1)

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Stadium: Animal safety and welfare top priority? #Dunedin

Ride the Rhythm colour (1)Screenshot.

“Doors open at 3:30pm with equestrian action kicking off the evening’s entertainment, thrilling the crowd from every angle. It will include everything from international show jumping and the high-paced action of mounted games, to the masterfully crafted grace, power and beauty of dressage to music. The stadium’s intimate feel will only add to the spectacle, bringing its own unique party atmosphere.

The highlight of the equestrian action will be the McMillian Equine Feeds Super Grand Prix, boasting a $50,000 prize, making it the second biggest Grand Prix in Australasia. Run over two rounds, the competition will feature some of Australasia’s leading jumping combinations.

As the equestrian entertainment draws to a close, The Hollies will take to the stage bringing down the curtain on Dunedin’s biggest night of the year, providing hours of entertainment.” http://www.ridetherhythm.co.nz/

Equestrian Information

Comments received.

Phil
Submitted on 2013/01/03 at 9:53 am

I read somewhere that the “highlight” is an attempt on the NZ high jumping record for horses. I’ve seen these events many time around the world and they can be incredibly dangerous for the horses. The height and force they land from/with puts tremendous stresses on their frames. Because of this, any attempt competition is always made on a specially prepared surface. They do not, repeat NOT, come down from 2+ metres onto a heavily compacted football pitch with all the forgiving qualities of a concrete slab. The riders are only ever specialist jumpers on horses trained specifically for this one event. Allowing this cowboy production to perform in our town puts a cloud over us all. Leave the rest in, drop the prices to match the product and get rid of the ridiculous jump. Show the animals some respect.

Phil
Submitted on 2013/01/03 at 9:43 am

You would think that someone with a knighthood would ask his reporters to check a story instead of simply posting a copy of the promoter’s advertising flyer and calling it journalism. Like the infamous rodeo, this is another overhyped event. There is only one legitimate show jumper on the start list, and she has sold the horse that gave her a name. Riding a new young horse is like expecting a Formula One driver to show his top skills while driving a Ford Escort. Riding is all about combinations. All top riders will be in Europe in February, at the height of the competition season, where their top horses are permanently based. The other so called “Olympians” date back almost 20 years and were Eventers. Expecting them to give a quality specialist display is like expecting a top Triathlete to win the Tour De France. These promoters are going to want to charge top dollar for tickets. The very least they could do is to be upfront about the product. Probably a bit much to ask. They have managed to shoot themselves in the foot a bit, however. So there is some justice. The date of the event is the same date as the national Dressage riding championships in Christchurch. A bit of a lesson in researching your target audience before trying to screw them.

The Animal Welfare Act 1999 is a very wide-ranging Act and deals with offences in the handling and management of animals (including fish and birds) in this country. For a full guide to the Animal Welfare Act 1999, visit the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) webpage.

SPCA Otago – Dunedin
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Email: office@otago-spca.org.nz
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Please do not send an email for animal welfare or emergencies. Please phone us on the above number.

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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