Monthly Archives: October 2011

Former Standard Insurance building 201 Princes St, Dunedin

Building Owner: Exchange Renaissance Limited

Standard Building sign [img_9083eclr3] 2

The Standard Fire and Marine Insurance Company of New Zealand Building was designed by architects Mason and Wales and put out to tender on 9 May 1874. The three-storeyed building, with a basement and slate roof, was completed in 1875. The insurance company remained at the building until 1884 when it moved to new offices in Lower High Street. A series of well-known businesses have been associated with the building in the century or more following.

Vacant since 1997, the Standard Building has been purchased by Ted Daniels and Wayne Marsh; they have also acquired the iconic former Bank of New Zealand building on the corner of Princes and Rattray Sts. Their planned redevelopment of the properties for commercial use includes conservation, restoration and adaptive reuse of the building fabric. Work is currently underway, the most visible of which is reinstatement of the historical facade of the Standard Building. Previously stripped, the original plaster detail and mouldings are being replicated, based on early photographs.

Post and images by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Heritage, Inspiration, Project management, Site, Urban design

Dunedin: “It’s All Right Here”

Facebook: Michelle Helliwell’s photos
Michelle Helliwell: Since this photo was taken, the DCC have broken and stolen our balls! (via Steve Mowat builder who contracts to them. Anyone who knows them, please advise them to return asap, as an official damage and theft complaint is underway. As members of the freeman society, our schedule of fees for damage of and removal of our property is quite expensive. Thanks.)
19 hours ago

Related Post:
21.9.11 Can it be true? Nahhh

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Events, Fun, Geography, Hot air, Inspiration, People, Politics, Site, Urban design

Design and innovation – challenge

### idealog.co.nz 19 October 2011 at 11:19 am
Design thinking: What’s it all about?
By Design Daily Team
What is design thinking, why is it so important and what impact will it have on the world? This two minute video offers a little insight.

Design & Thinking Official Documentary Trailer from Design&Thinking on Vimeo.

### idealog.co.nz 19 October 2011 at 12:34 pm
Branson’s business challenge: Impress me and reap rewards
Sir Richard Branson has issued a challenge to New Zealand businesses: Prove you have the mettle to go global – and win a six-figure boost for your company. In conjunction with BNZ, Virgin and Air New Zealand have put together a prize package worth more than $100,000 for one company with the “right stuff” – including time with Branson himself, a $100,000 cash prize, a BNZ business education scholarship, mentoring from Virgin and BNZ execs, and access to Virgin meeting rooms worldwide. Air New Zealand and Virgin Australia will also give the winning business a travel package and flights to London, New York and Geneva.

To be considered, entrepreneurs must demonstrate “creativity and innovation with the potential to go global”, aspiring to reach $50 million turnover within five years.

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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INSANE, Dave! Occupy Dunedin STAYS in the Octagon.

DON’T MOVE. DON’T ACCEPT THE MARKET RESERVE. KEEP THE PROTEST CENTRAL AND HIGHLY VISIBLE . . . WHILE DUNEDIN CITY COUNCILLORS CONTINUE TO SELL OUR FUTURE DOWN THE TUBES.

### ODT Online Fri, 21 Oct 2011
Occupy protesters offered other site
By David Loughrey
Protesters in the Octagon have been offered an alternative site at the Market Reserve in Dunedin, a move Mayor Dave Cull said was designed to return the Octagon to all city residents. Mr Cull last night said council chief executive Paul Orders had organised a staff member to pass on the message to the group yesterday afternoon. The protesters had been invited to the council today to speak to Mr Orders, and give their response.
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Images ©2011 Elizabeth Kerr

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Idealog: R&D and innovation

“Kids are missing out in New Zealand because there’s no connect between the education system and a vision for where we’re going to grow our economy.” -Sir Paul Callaghan

### idealog.co.nz 18 October 2011 at 3:36 pm
Let’s end the flip-flopping on R&D
By Sarah Robson
What do Rakon, Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Tait Electronics, Gallagher Group and Weta Digital have in common? Aside from being successful and enjoying a high profile in business, they’re also the benefactors of the government’s first round of technology development grants, announced late last year. (A second round was awarded in August, with recipients including accounting startup darling Xero.) National pulled no punches in scrapping the Labour government’s all-encompassing R&D tax credit in favour of a targeted, grant-based approach. It’s not a given – businesses have to apply for a slice of the funding pie along with every other man and his dog, and there are no guarantees. But it’s time for government to stop flip-flopping on the issue. Cuts to government spending aren’t going to lift New Zealand out of the economic doldrums. Investment in R&D just might.

Prominent scientist and New Zealander of the Year Sir Paul Callaghan believes New Zealand needs to diversify its economy if its goal is to expand GDP per capita, and start selling ‘brain content’. That means you’re selling products where the manufacturing costs aren’t the main costs of the products – it’s the R&D content.

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24.9.11 Idealog: Paul Callaghan’s business plan for New Zealand
21.9.11 John Montgomery: The Economy, Culture and Design of Cities
23.6.11 Kathryn Ryan interviews agribusiness pioneer George Harrison
22.5.11 Audacious idea: New Zealand X-Prize Environmental and Energy

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Design, Economics, Innovation, Inspiration, People, Politics, Project management

Octagon protest occupies minds!

Images ©2011 Elizabeth Kerr

### ODT Online Wed, 19 Oct 2011
Opinion
Campers strike a common chord
By Simon Cunliffe
Brrrrr! Not great weather for camping. It’ll soon be a bog up there in the Octagon – where the good folk of the “Occupy Dunedin” movement have parked their tents. Can’t imagine they’ll want to stay long in this sort of weather but one or two of them seem determined to remain. There’s been a bit of a squabble over statutes governing occupation of the site. It’s been said a 19th-century bylaw allowing immigrants en route to the Central Otago goldfields to squat temporarily in the city centre is still in force. A neat irony that: it’s a gold rush of a different kind this mob have set up shop to condemn. Their focus is corporate greed, social inequality, free-market economics and environmental issues, much of which they would undoubtedly argue arises from the unfettered accumulation of the aforementioned “gold”. And, interestingly, it’s an echo that has been witnessed in large-scale demonstrations across the world.
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• Simon Cunliffe is deputy editor (news) at the Otago Daily Times.

### ODT Online Wed, 19 Oct 2011
Spirit of protest not dampened by rain
By John Lewis
Anti-capitalism protesters are yet to decide how long they intend to stay in the Octagon, but the Dunedin City Council is going out of its way not to put pressure on the group to respond to its request for a timeline.
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### ODT Online Wed, 19 Oct 2011
Opinion
Importance of sharing our common wealth forgotten
By Alison MacTavish
The Rugby World Cup has predictably given rise to plenty of discussions about whether rugby is our national religion, or about its importance to our national identity. Election proposals that run counter to the more fundamental values of being a New Zealander, however, have attracted far less discussion.

John Key and his Government have said they will take re-election as a mandate for selling our assets. With most New Zealanders reportedly against asset sales, but with the National Party odds on to form the next government, the danger is that a vote for the National Party will be a vote for asset sales. And, of course, the National Government prefers to focus on how we can divvy up the spoils, rather than discussing the fundamental social justice issue.

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• Alison MacTavish lives near Moeraki.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust

The Dunedin Prison, situated in an architecturally and historically important heritage precinct in Anzac Square, was first occupied in 1898 and is possibly Australasia’s only extant Victorian courtyard prison.

The Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust is in the process of raising funds for a feasibility study for the building, which was decommissioned in August 2007, after operating as a prison for more than a century.

Charities Services | Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust
Registration No: CC46118
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Dunedin Prison (Former)
Corner 2 Castle Street and State Highway 1; Dunbar Street, Dunedin
Registration Number: 4035
Historic Place – Category I

A Dunedin gaol has stood on this central city site since 1855. First occupied by immigration barracks, these were converted into temporary prison accommodation in 1855. The land was vested in the city as a site for a public gaol in June 1858. It was not until 1861 that new gaol buildings were readied. Additional buildings were added over the following years as need outstripped accommodation. With the appointment of Arthur Hume (1838-41?-1918) to the position of Inspector of Prisons in 1880, a centralised system of penal administration began. He instituted a programme of new prison building, designed to implement the ‘English system’ of penal reform.

Plans for the new Dunedin Prison were completed in 1892 by John Campbell (1857-1942), Government Architect. Modelled on New Scotland Yard, the prison was designed in a Queen Anne style including cupola domes, dormers, striped brick and Oamaru stone elevations, and fine detailing. The layout consisted of four blocks surrounding a central courtyard. Construction was delayed as the Dunedin community felt the central site could be better utilised. Work finally began, however, in 1895. The exterior was finished by April 1897 and on 16 June 1898 the prison was occupied.

Due to staffing shortages during World War One, police staff were relocated from their neighbouring barracks into the prison’s administration block. In 1959 the accommodation was converted into a women’s prison. In 1974, it became a male remand and short sentence prison and remained so until 2007 when it was vacated.

█ Source: Heritage New Zealand – List No. 4035

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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