Daily Archives: March 3, 2011

Animal welfare #eqnz #chch

The following services are available. However, it was reported on TV3’s Nightline tonight that Christchurch animal welfare services are overwhelmed by the number of animals – many not microchipped – they have received for care. They are hoping to move some animals to alternative shelters and facilities in other centres.

Animal Control
For lost or found dogs please contact Animal Control on 021 240 8310 or visit 10 Metro Place – Open 8:00am to 6:00pm #eqnz

Microchipped animals
There is now a good microchip register in New Zealand.

Paw Justice
Text “HELP” to 4662 to donate $3 to Paw Justice towards pet food for Chch Animal Quake victims ♥

Pets on the Net
Pets on the Net http://www.petsonthenet.co.nz/ is working with the SPCA to save lives, this is a free community service. Earthquake: Petsonthenet is the nationwide database for lost and found pets, as phone service resumes please report and search for lost, found or deceased pets here. Phone reports will be accepted for those without internet access on 07 868 5581

SPCA animal emergencies
@RNZSPCA Canterbury SPCA animal emergencies 9am-4pm call 03 349 7057 ext 201 or 205; after hours call 03 366 3886 #eqnz

SPCA pet listings
Information about animal welfare and lost/found pets is available on the SPCA NZ website http://bit.ly/he8SKU #eqnz #chch

Trade Me pet listings
Go to the Trade Me home page for information on missing and found pets.

Vets Clinics
The majority of Christchurch vets clinics are now operating #chch
The veterinary clinic in Hornby is operating an After Hours service – the clinic has temporarily relocated to: Hornby Vet Centre, 7 Tower Street, Hornby
Phone 03 366 1052
Weekdays 7pm to 8am
Weekends are Saturday from 12pm thru to 8am on Monday

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@Baxter_man (RT @OtagoLad) A foto of my new mate Sammyman Sams Nose – new @blipfoto journal entry – http://bit.ly/eWSGJD

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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restorm: Will Wiles attempts to deconstruct the legacy of “Saint Jane” Jacobs

Thanks to Storm Cunningham, Washington DC @restorm for the link.

Some crusty issues from this one commentator, Will Wiles, bursting and engaging with levels, biases, contradictions, established takes, whatever, in the considered effort to wake us up.

Apart from the fact that cities (as opposed to country towns like Dunedin?) are ‘live wild animals’, it does no harm to consider the urban environment as a dense web or series of interconnected (metaphorical) ‘rooms’, forming the diverse aggregation of human activity.

Various posts at What if? tangle with diversity, infrastructure, mixed use and spatial ideas, fully knowing the machine that drives formation of a spatial plan at DCC will be very far – frighteningly distant – from approaching contemporary urban theory and practice, including the practical weighty mass of real commerce and ethics.

The non application or watering down of ‘local’ discussion and full-blooded, full-bodied debate will be the risk to Dunedin and the region’s future, premised on a GIS mapping exercise that most probably will work like a parking diagram.

And we know what happened to city parking recently… Political decisions made at Council without adequate understanding of interconnectedness, at the business end of people dynamics. Just wait until this non thinking applies to the city as a whole. It’s coming. Start building your stealth bombers.

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### urbanophile.com 1 March 2011
Saint Jane by Will Wiles

Jacobs appealed to me because it chimed with what I saw in cities and what I liked about them – and the Nurbanists have no idea what this quality is. Their agenda for “neighbourhoods”, “contextuality”, “walkability”, is fundamentally anti-urban. These qualities aren’t necessarily bad in themselves – but combined in pursuit of the singular Nurbanist vision, they mean the vivisection of the city into un-urban cells.

The Pelican edition of Death and Life, with cover by Germano Facetti:

Wiles begins…
A spectre is haunting urbanism – the spectre of Jane Jacobs. The American-Canadian writer and activist died in 2006, but she continues to exert influence over the urban debate, primarily via that dreary federacy of messianic dovecote enthusiasts, the “New Urbanists”, who have taken her up as a kind of guiding prophet. Outside the ranks of the Kunstlers and Kriers, there is a great swath of architects, thinkers and writers on the city who have read Jacobs and hold her in high regard. With a touch of embarrassment, I should include myself in this latter category. Not being an architect, I was an auto-didact in urban theory. When I came across a Pelican edition of Jacobs’ best-known book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, in a second-hand bookshop almost a decade ago, I had never heard of her. But I loved the Germano Facetti cover design, the back sounded interesting enough, and the price was right, so I took it home.

At that point, my reading on urban theory had been scattershot, based entirely in what I found in 2nd-hand bookshops: Corbu, Lewis Mumford, Thomas Sharp, Steen Eiler Rasmussen, an odd band who had given me all sorts of interesting ideas and imagery, but nothing very coherent. What they had in common, more or less, was that I didn’t really enjoy reading them all that much, and had mostly got through to the end in a spirit of patient self-improvement. I picked up Jacobs, expecting more of the same, and instead ploughed through it in a matter of days. If nothing else, she taught me that book-length urban theory could be hugely entertaining.
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-Will Wiles is a writer and Deputy Editor of Icon, a monthly architecture and design magazine.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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“A nice dream from Christchurch”

Thanks to James Green for supplying this link – we’re using your heading as tweeted :)

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 13:04 28/02/2011
Drivetalk: Among the trees a city will grow
By Dave Moore
I was told many times when I arrived in New Zealand that Christchurch was the most English city outside England. It wasn’t. The most English cities outside England are in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, but once I experienced the Avon river, its poplars, the CBD architecture, and the city’s mildly genteel sensibilities, I knew what they meant.

By then I’d also fallen in love with the place, its people and its wide boulevards, and the ability to drive across town in just a few minutes. In fact the wide linear boulevards and cross-town convenience were two things that actually made Christchurch differ from similarly sized British cities.

Things are going to change now, since nature viciously and fatally shook the city and all but razed its core, and already there are arguments about what kind of architecture will come to define the place.

But I’m more interested in the infrastructural opportunities it presents.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Canterbury Earthquake Appeal

DONATIONS TO CANTERBURY EARTHQUAKE APPEAL
The best way you can help the recovery effort and survivors is by giving donations of money to the Canterbury Earthquake Appeal.

(via @NZcivildefence) The New Zealand Government has launched a global appeal to help the people of Christchurch and Canterbury http://goo.gl/juym3 #eqnz #Christchurch [How to make your donation by Credit Card]

Go to the Trade Me home page for information on how to donate.

Visit your local banks and make donations there.

New World Supermarkets
You can make donations to the Canterbury Earthquake Appeal at all New World checkouts.

@BNZBank To donate to BNZ’s @NZRedCross appeal account, use the donate button within BNZ internet banking or this acct: 02-0500-0982004-000 #eqnz

@BNZBank We’ve just updated our instant #eqnz donation button on BNZ internet banking to include credit cards. There’ll be no fees for CC donations.

@NZredcross Pls note: 0800 733 276 is NOT a donation number for #eqnz U can donate here: http://www.redcross.org.nz/donate thnks

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Donations by Text Message:

@CEQgovtnz Telecom, Vodafone and 2 Degrees mobile customers can text ‘chch’ to 933 to make an automatic $3 donation #chch #eqnz

Red Cross donations to Christchurch Earthquake Appeal: text ‘quake’ to 4419 to make a $3 donation #eqnz

Salvation Army donations to Christchurch Earthquake Appeal: text ‘quake’ to 5339 to make a $3 donation #eqnz

VodafoneNZ Red Alert 2011 Earthquake Appeal: text ‘QUAKE’ to 555 to make a $5 donation. 100% of your $5 donation will go to the Red Cross 2011 Earthquake Appeal.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin can provide vacant buildings, warehouses and offices #eqnz

UPDATED 7 March 2011

Civil Defence in Christchurch wants people to hold off on demolishing buildings unless there is an immediate risk to public safety #eqnz

### ODT Online Mon, 7 Mar 2011
Help, not exploitation Dunedin focus
By Eileen Goodwin
Dunedin must walk a “fine line” between helping Christchurch business and seeming to exploit the situation, Dunedin City Council economic development unit manager Peter Harris says. Mr Harris said the business unit viewed the situation primarily as aid, rather than a commercial opportunity.
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### ODT Online Mon, 7 Mar 2011
Steady stream of real estate inquiries
Some Christchurch businesses are considering moving to Dunedin but uncertainty over practical issues such as insurance means they are unable to make firm decisions, Dunedin commercial real estate agent Mike Elford says.
Read more

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### ODT Online Thu, 3 Mar 2011
Dunedin space offered
By Chris Morris
Otago Chamber of Commerce chief executive John Christie yesterday told the Otago Daily Times the Christchurch earthquake was a tragedy, but could also be a “game-changer” for the entire South Island economy.

The Otago chamber had been inundated with more than 100 offers, after asking members for a list of vacant buildings, warehouses and offices in Dunedin available for use by Christchurch businesses. That included premises available free of charge, at low cost or commercial rates, and for flexible, short- and long-term leases. Others were offering free internet, office furniture or reduced-cost transportation, among other services, or to take on apprentices from Christchurch short-term.
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### ODT Online Thu, 3 Mar 2011
University of Otago aiding affected students
By John Gibb
In the aftermath of last week’s earthquake, the University of Otago is taking several measures to support Canterbury and Lincoln University students who have been affected. Since late last week, Otago University has been helping with the relocation of international students from Christchurch to Dunedin. A limited number of domestic students had also made inquiries about transferring to Otago and some had already arrived in Dunedin.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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