Historic heritage notes

Updated post
Sun, 16 Aug 2015 at 6:17 p.m.

“It is exceptionally attractive for a substation.” –Grady Cameron, Aurora

### ODT Online Sun, 26 Dec 2010
Aurora keeps facility
By Nigel Benson
An electricity substation in Ward St, Dunedin, has been preserved as an example of art deco industrial architecture. The 33kV substation was built in 1938 for the Dunedin City Council Electricity Department to service the surrounding industrial area.
Read more

Inside the substation is half museum and half shiny, humming new electricity equipment run by computer and controlled from elsewhere.

### ODT Online Sun, 16 Aug 2015
Inside The Ward St substation
By David Loughrey
The Ward St substation is one Dunedin’s finest infrastructure buildings, an art deco masterpiece […] The Ward St substation (actually in Bauchop St) sits quietly humming in Dunedin’s industrial sector. […] The substation was the second to be built in Dunedin, after the Halfway Bush station, between 1937 and 1939. […] It is hard to decipher the signature of the city electrical engineer who signed off the architectural drawings for the building back in the 1930s; perhaps it was Harrison, perhaps Henderson.
Read more

Post and image (2002) by Elizabeth Kerr

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149 Comments

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149 responses to “Historic heritage notes

  1. David M

    While at the same time congratulating them – was it necessary to paint the previously unpainted concrete or cement render exterior walls? I understand it might have looked a bit patchy by the time they fixed up all the cracks etc., but it does seem a shame.

    • Elizabeth

      We’ll find out how this came about and who advised it. Painting may have been elected to prevent or reduce the possibility of concrete spalling (aka concrete rot). However, we also need to take into account the preservationist debate going on – internationally – of whether to paint or not paint our modern concrete buildings…

  2. David M

    Thanks for that – it would be interesting to know how the practical/aesthetic decisions are being made in this area. Within the past 3 or 4 years a few landmark Victorian or early 20th century buildings (probably rendered brick, and previously unpainted) have been painted. I’m thinking of two terrace houses in Clyde Street, a two-storeyed shop in Green Island, and the large two-storeyed house in Smith Street that was a gallery (aka ‘The Manse’, although I don’t think it was built as a church house).

    As an aside, and digressing into ancient history, the very unfortunate painting of the stonework of the BNZ may have been due to a national executive (I’m not sure of the correct title), Dick Green, who around the late 1950s thought branches around the country should be the same colour (pea green to start with?). I’m not sure how accurate that is – it was told to me by an elderly family member closely connected with the bank at the time.

  3. David M

    Yes, I guess I’m thinking more of pre-WW2 rendered buildings where I hadn’t noticed a spalling problem. The modern buildings must be the major area of concern. The Medical Library/Sayers Building and Smithells gym are another couple of examples. Imagine how awful John Wickliffe house would look painted. Great with its brutalist integrity still intact though.

  4. Stu

    Which building in Green Island are you thinking of?

    The large building on the corner of Main South Road and Howden St has just been refurbished by the owners of Larson’s Pharmacy. Google Street View is still showing the unrestored version.

  5. James

    The Medical Library/Sayers Building
    I think this is one of the reasons why it, and the Adams behind it are earmarked for demolition in the campus master-plan. It’s suitability as a modern library space is pretty limited; I’m pretty sure I’ve heard the staff say as much.

    • Elizabeth

      I’ll go further off topic, James.
      The Microbugs reclad – from memory, it generated a cost saving of $7 million (I’ll check my technical notes taken when speaking with Jeff Thompson, Opus Architecture) – proved to the university that recladding is an extremely cost effective way of maintaining a large building asset in the throes of concrete spalling. Compared to a new build.

      Underlining this, we gave it an NZIA 2010 Southern Architecture Award and a Resene 2010 Colour Award. Shades of building ‘preservation’ of a completely other sort, admittedly. The reclad combined a complex approach to lowering internal temperatures in the laboratories. Due to the heat generated by plant and equipment as well as solar gain temperatures used to climb to 43 degrees in the work spaces.

      Mercifully, this kind of building study will challenge a few ‘non sustainability’ assumptions contained in the campus master plan – quite considerably.

  6. David M

    That’s the one I’m thinking of. The Howden St elevation is still unrendered, unpainted brick. The Main South Road elevation was rendered and unpainted above the ground floor. It is now painted. I see that in the restoration (and don’t get me wrong, I think it’s impressive work) they had to reinstate parts of the the ground floor facade where large unsympathetic windows had been put in. I imagine it would have been difficult to achieve an even-looking appearance without painting, but it’s still an interesting case.

    The real shame to my eyes is the Lighthouse church/ex Civic on the opposite corner where they painted over the coloured bricks/tiles on the facade about 10 years (?) back. It’s now the ubiquitous beige-grey.

  7. Stu

    Yes, drove past just earlier this afternoon. I think they have generally done a good job on the rework.

    Actually, over the road is another example of another repainted shop – the homewares place next to Supervalue which is now quite a sympathetic shade of brown.

  8. James

    Elizabeth — as you know, Adams is the least adorned of the John Wickliffe/Micro/Adams trilogy, and suffers from much the same issues. However, even despite the apparent success of the micro retro-fit, doing the same for the Adams building seems to be not being considered (last I heard, although I have been out of that loop for 6 months).

    Incidentally, given how poorly the pared down versions of the design have faired, that would imply that John Wickliffe ought to be in serious need of attention??

    • Elizabeth

      Must ask around about John Wickliffe House. Haven’t had a chat with Barry Mackay about the Adams Building, worth having. (maybe the cost of extending the Dental School is taxing minds heavily, as a distraction…)

  9. Stu

    JWH is interesting how it fits three buildings together – the two almost separate halves of JWH itself and Plaza House extension. It’s also one of the style (along with Philip Laing House) that has janitor/custodial accommodation on the top floor.

    It’s a real pain to cable and service. When Kordia or TelstraClear ran fibre in, they installed a chain and pulley system in one of the service ducts. Then someone carefully went through and cable tied it at every level all the way up to ensure that it couldn’t be easily used.

    The basement and rooftop are heavily used by telecommunications companies for service provisioning – both Kordia and TelstraClear have a large presence there, among others.

  10. David M

    The micro building screams facelift – it’s the Joan Rivers of Dunedin architecture. Love it or hate it JW House is one of the most significant buildings ever built in this city, and it calls for a more sensitive approach to its modernist/brutalist heritage. Its outward appearance should change as little as possible. Time for an Historic Places Trust listing?

    • Elizabeth

      JWH has been included in lists for assessment towards scheduling in the District Plan. Registration helps.

    • Elizabeth

      ### treehugger.com 4 January 2011 (via Breaking Arch News on Twitter)
      Design & Architecture
      If Old Buildings Are So Green And Efficient, Why Do We Keep Losing Them?
      By Lloyd Alter, Toronto
      I do prattle on with quotes like Carl Elefante’s “the greenest building is the one already standing” and the Steve Mouzon version “The greenest brick is the one already in the wall.” I love to quote Richard Moe: “When you strip away the rhetoric, preservation is simply having the good sense to hold on to things that are well designed, that link us with our past in a meaningful way, and that have plenty of good use left in them.” Yet all over North America, old buildings fall into disuse, they are subject to demolition by neglect, and often get hit by what I will call “heritage lightning”, that strange burning that happens in vacant buildings with no electricity or gas or other conventional sources of ignition.

      A walkable city needs some low buildings, that allow sunlight to penetrate to the street and create wonderful eye-level streetscapes. A resilient city needs a mix of building types, to adapt in times of change. A creative city needs old buildings. As Jane Jacobs put it, “Old ideas can sometimes use new buildings. New ideas must use old buildings.”

      Read more

      -Lloyd Alter volunteers as President of the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario.

      More on old buildings being green:
      The Greenest Brick: City Votes to Demolish Entire Street of 41 Historic Buildings
      “Old is the New Green” According to National Trust For Historic Preservation
      15 Good Reasons To Save Old Schools
      The Greenest Building is the One Already Standing
      Another One Bites The Dust: Walter Gropius Buildings Being Torn Down in Chicago
      Why are Old Buildings Like Green Gadgets?
      Big Steps in Building: Ban Demolition
      12 Big Steps to Make Building Better

      ****

      DUNEDIN– Dates have been set for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust appeal to the Environment Court of the decision by Dunedin City Council to grant resource consent to Prista Apartments Ltd (372-392 Princes St and 11 Stafford St). The parties have ruled out mediation.

      • Elizabeth

        ### showmedaily.org 4 January 2011 1:08 p.m
        The French Find a Free-Market Solution to Historic Preservation
        By Christine Harbin
        When I was driving into work today, I heard a story on NPR about how a private company is turning a dilapidated part of the French Palace of Versailles, the Hôtel du Grand Contrôle, into a luxury hotel. According to the story:

        [Deputy Administrator for the Palace of Versailles] Hautchamp says Versailles doesn’t have the $7 million it will take to restore the building, which is why it turned to Belgian hotel company Ivy International. The company will renovate the mansion and turn its 23 bedrooms into a luxury hotel. A percentage of the profits will be paid back to the Palace of Versailles in rent. The restoration is the first in a series of commercial projects aimed at saving French monuments.

        Read more

        (via restorm on Twitter)

        • Elizabeth

          ### nzherald.co.nz 5:30 AM Friday Jan 7, 2011
          Plan to shift Deco houses ‘an insult’
          By Wayne Thompson
          The Art Deco Society has slated the Auckland Council’s reasons for refusing to place a heritage order on three Spanish mission-style houses at St Heliers village which are threatened by a development.

          The society, after consulting prominent environmental lawyer Michael Savage, said councillors were scared off by “inaccurate and incomplete” staff advice.

          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          Nice, Phillip Hartley! (Salmond Reed Architects) – but probably too late.

          Tweet:

          @10PARK RT @NZPlanning Under-threat cottages in good condition – surveyor: Three much-loved art deco houses scheduled to be demolished … http://bit.ly/hECN3I

  11. James

    The micro building screams facelift – it’s the Joan Rivers of Dunedin architecture.
    Because the exterior ‘skin’ is not structural (except for the ends of the concrete columns and floors), recladding was always going to fundamentally change it. I still haven’t quite got over Michael Findlay asserting that the exterior treatment of Micro and Science III (Physics/Science Library) were both done as a nod to the clocktower (as with Hocken). Curiously, he also is a fan of the Adams Building because of its stripped down nature that shows Ian Dunn’s underlying design of John Wickliffe and Micro. I can’t recollect if he’s a fan of John Wickliffe, but after finding out the connection, I revisited John Wickliffe, and although it doesn’t appear it from the outside, once you’re in, the connection between the three is quite evident.
    Personally, I think my favourite concrete brute is the hospital ward block, which thus far shows no signs of concrete cancer/spalling. Maybe a few extra years of youth helps.

    • Elizabeth

      That would be Michael doing his storytelling re Science III and Micro(biology) – how did they really get shoved across the ditch from Registry? The architectural relationship between the Richardson building (formerly known as the Hocken building) and Registry is something I’ve heard direct from Ted McCoy on a few occasions now; I’ve also read and interviewed Ted about it in co-writing his NZIA Gold Medal history and citation. There is a sort of architect bubble about it, which is open to direct challenge – because to my mind the link is at best a handy poetics with some roof references thrown in, or call it an argument of convenience in pulling off a big project on campus with the hierarchy to be convinced they should back the sheer indulgence. The university has been a breeding ground for some quite restrained modernist and utilitarian architectural practice.

      The Ward Block doesn’t bother me, it’s going to be with us a good long while. How it can be re-tuned inside for contemporary and future hospital use is a fascinating poser for central government.

  12. James

    Actually, I was in Pine Hill about 6 months ago, and actually, from that angle and distance Science III almost works. The cladding and roof do actually merge in pleasant way and it does almost seem to echo the registry building. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work when looked at from other places.

    I was only referring to the exterior of the Ward block. The interior is a different story. I was, however, fascinated to discover recently that the exterior ribs contain service ducts, so actually serve a clear purpose.

  13. Elizabeth

    Another central city building under threat:

    Which one? ‘The Bindary’, the square cottage behind the Carnegie Centre in Moray Place, also hidden from street view by the Melbourne-style terrace houses to Moray Place (Hansborough House) and the Stuart St terrace houses. The building faces onto the courtyard behind the Carnegie.

    It seems the owner of the Carnegie Centre is of a mind to demolish the historic cottage in order to build a motel.

    Cottage sddress (via DCC webmaps): 197 Stuart St
    Rates account: 110 Moray Place – O’Brien Holdings Ltd
    Property Number: 5068969

    The property is located in TH03 North Princes Street/Moray Place/Exchange Townscape Precinct.

    ****

    See protections noted in the Dunedin City District Plan for the immediate neighbouring buildings:

    B406 Map 35 Carnegie Centre 109 Moray Place Section 39 Block XIV Town of Dunedin, Certificate of Title OT292/19 and Part Section 40 Block XIV Town of Dunedin, Certificate of Title OT140/124
    (NZHPT) 4707 Category II
    (Protection) facade and bulk appearance to Moray Place

    B407 Map 35 Hansborough House 112-114 Moray Place Lot 2 DP 3122
    (NZHPT) 4708 Category II
    (Protection) facade and bulk appearance to Moray Place

    B573 Map 35 Stuart Street Terrace Houses 199-225 Stuart Street and 118-120 Moray Place Pt Lot 1-4 DP6009
    (NZHPT) 4709 Category I
    (Protection) facades and bulk appearance to Stuart Street and Moray Place

    • Elizabeth

      Tweet (Thu 20 Jan 16:08):

      @TVNZNews (RT by @10PARK) Environment Court orders halt to demolition of art deco cottages http://bit.ly/f9MnVn #TVNZNews

      • Elizabeth

        Protestors have won an injunction to at least 24 January

        ### tvnz.co.nz 3:54PM Thursday January 20, 2011
        Court orders halt to demolition of art deco cottages
        Source: NZPA/ONE News
        Protesters fighting to save three art deco houses in the Auckland suburb of St Heliers today won an Environment Court order halting the demolition, just as half of one of the buildings was knocked down. Save Our St Heliers Society protesters have been doing all they can to stop the demolition of the three Spanish-style houses on Turua St. The site is to be redeveloped into office and retail space.

        “Over a number of years there have been far far too many heritage buildings lost and it’s a hell of shame to lose more.”
        -Richard Oddy, protestor

        Read more + Video

        ****

        ### 3news.co.nz Thu, 20 Jan 2011 6:09p.m.
        Saved by a phone call – heritage buildings avoid demolition
        By Kim Choe
        There was drama in the Auckland surburb of St Heliers as heritage enthusiasts watched two art deco cottages being torn down. Their repeated appeals to the council and environment court failed to get the buildings heritage protection, and the council said it could not afford to buy them off the developer . . . But minutes after demolition began it stopped.
        Read more + Video

  14. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Mon, 24 Jan 2011
    Iron gates go missing
    By Hamish McNeilly
    Old ornate wrought iron gates are being targeted by thieves looking to make a quick buck, Dunedin police say. Over the past week, five iron gates – including three on Saturday night, were stolen from residential addresses around North Dunedin. Residents who might have seen anyone acting suspiciously were urged to contact Dunedin police.
    Read more

    Gates from Belleknowes, Opoho, Mornington and Maori Hill had been taken over the past week. Scrap metal dealers say ‘the gates were worth next to nothing, and it was possible the gates would be sold to other homeowners’.

  15. Richard

    Have had a quick look without success to try and find the post (I think by Paul) re the ‘Stavely Building’. Anyway, I meant to note at the time that I had noticed prior to Christmas that the new roof trusses (or whatever) were in place and, when I went past an hour ago, I noted that the new roofing iron is in place.

    So, the new owner/s are keeping their word that the building would be restored. I recall the structure itself was not too badly damaged by the fire of two years or so ago but it must be very solid!

  16. Elizabeth

    ### nzherald.co.nz 5:30 AM Thursday Jan 27, 2011
    Super City faces heritage test
    By Hayley Hannen – The Aucklander
    Auckland’s new local government format is facing its first major test. On one side are council heritage advisors and residents of a street “protected” for its historic look; on the other, a Council-Controlled Organisation that says it doesn’t have to play by the rules.
    Read more

    ****

    Hamish Keith on ‘A Toxic Environment for Heritage’ . . .

    Tweet:

    @hamish_keith Something dodgy in Turua Street – new post http://bit.ly/gtK6oT @aklcouncil @mayorlenbrown tell us how this happened or don’t you know?

  17. Elizabeth

    It appears the old Edinburgh Castle hotel (1861) has been unearthed in Caversham.

    ### ODT Online Wed, 2 Feb 2011
    Road workers uncover link to past
    By David Loughrey
    Road workers in Caversham, Dunedin, yesterday uncovered what appears to be a link to one of the city’s earlier hotels.
    Read more

    ****

    ### D Scene 2-2-11
    Reflecting on our favourite places around Dunedin
    By Owen Graham, NZHPT Area Manager, Otago/Southland
    Dunedin city is a beautiful place, enhanced admirably by its iconic heriateg buildings, supported equally well by less grand, though no less important, heritage buildings, located in amazing character streets and rows.
    {continues} #bookmark

    Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

    • Elizabeth

      ### ODT Online Wed, 2 Feb 2011
      ‘Cracking’ on with tomb work
      By Craig Baxter
      Restoration work on the badly damaged tomb of William Larnach in Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery has taken another significant step with the installation of security and lighting systems.
      ODT Link

    • Elizabeth

      ### D Scene 2-2-11
      Behind brick walls (pages 9-10, 27)
      This is the third of four in a weekly series, Beyond the Facade, where D Scene takes a peek behind some well-known landmark buildings to see what can be found inside. Today D Scene photographer Wilma McCorkindale takes her camera into King Edward Court, the former King Edward Technical College, capturing a candid look inside.
      {continues} #bookmark

      • Elizabeth

        The King Edward Technical College Jubilee takes place in Dunedin this weekend.

        ### ODT Online Sat, 27 Aug 2011
        New friends
        Jubilee committee spokesman Bruce Cromb said 840 people had registered for the event and about 660 attended the informal get-together last night. A weekend of activities was planned including a tour of the school’s buildings, photographs and a formal banquet.
        ODT Link

    • Elizabeth

      The owner of the house is All Black and Highlander lock Tom Donnelly.

      ### ODT Online Wed, 9 Feb 2011
      Complaint made as slate roof replaced
      By John Lewis
      The Dunedin City Council is investigating work carried out on a historic building in Dundas St, after a corrugated iron roof was installed over one of the terrace houses yesterday. The brick building with slate tile roofing was constructed in the 1880s and was listed as a New Zealand Historic Places Trust category 2 building in 2005.

      New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago Southland area manager Owen Graham said he had not been contacted by the owners of the building, or the builders.

      Read more

      • Elizabeth

        ACC wrecks marine and industrial heritage. Wynyard Quarter goes to glass.

        ### nzherald.co.nz 5:30 AM Wednesday Feb 9, 2011
        Council gags board over secret destruction deal
        By Bernard Orsman
        The Waitemata Local Board has been gagged from talking publicly about a secret deal condemning eight 20th century industrial buildings in the Wynyard Quarter to rubble. The former Auckland City Council is understood to have done a deal with a private landowner, Viaduct Harbour Holdings, to leave eight buildings out of a list of 17 buildings deemed worthy of protection by Salmond Reed heritage architects.
        Read more

  18. David M

    I noticed last December a two-storeyed house in Frederick Street had its chimneys removed and slate-tiled roof replaced with long-run iron. That wasn’t a listed building though. The mortar on some of those Dundas Street terraces has (among other things) been looking pretty dodgy for a while. They would look amazing if they could be restored, including the buildings on the corner sites (it now takes a bit of imagination to see the dairy as part of the original concept).

  19. Phil

    From the way the building owner was talking, it didn’t sound like he had sought a resource consent. If it was me, and I had obtained consent, that would have been the first thing I said. Instead of saying that I had to replace the roof because I had tenants arriving. I’m surprised that the planning officer from the DCC couldn’t say if consent had been granted. Presumably he was sitting in front of his computer at the time he took the telephone call from the ODT reporter. Should have been a straight forward yes/no answer. Don’t know usually means no. Maybe there was a rush going on to put through a retrospective consent as “emergency works”. He is a Highlander, after all. I don’t know how many teeth the enforcement branch have, or are willing to use. If this happened in the UK without consent, the owner would be required to reinstate the roof.

    • Elizabeth

      Reinstating the slate roof is possible here as a requirement, but will DCC weasle out of dishing tough love to a property owner. I was hoping ‘don’t know’ meant we’re looking hard at the legals and enforcement criteria.

  20. James

    I don’t know if this has changed any in the last decade, but I would not want to own one of these; I’m not sure if any of the landlords have yet come up with a good solution. If I recollect, the upstairs front rooms are approximately the same width as a double/queen mattress, so they are hardly ideal student bedrooms. The lean-to spaces out the back that now serve as living areas have proved almost impossible to heat, and because the room sizes have made them increasingly hard to let, there hasn’t been a lot of investment. My observation is that they are increasingly sitting empty until quite late in the piece, which is quite telling given their proximity to campus.
    The terrace houses at the top end of George St were similarly flawed; if I recollect, many of the rooms had mezzanine bunk beds, again, because they were only queen width, and not too long either. They need a good solution, however, as otherwise as they become increasingly marginal, half-arsed repairs will only become more common.

    • Elizabeth

      James – this area of the city requires a mixed population (not all students) to bring the place and buildings back. The solution for the various terrace houses is to raise their prestige and tenant them differently, with good adaptive reuse and development to their back sides and yards. Not that hard. A shifting off of certain landlords would most certainly help.

  21. UglyBob

    Once upon a time I lived in 88 and 90 Dundas – both corner Terraces on the Castle St intersection. The latter was owned by a couple of young landlords called Martin and Allan Dippie. My recollection is that there were two double size bedrooms and one pokie single room in each flat, a steep narrow staircase, small kitchen and living area with the old fashioned outside dunny and laundry area. At that time, late ’80s/early ’90s, the main block of terrace houses was pretty run down and poorly managed by a local real estate firm. It seems very little has changed.

  22. James

    @UglyBob — never lived in one, but had friends that did. In my time, the original lounge downstairs at the front was a good size, with two pokie single rooms at the front upstairs, and a slightly better one at the back. Lean-tos extended into a living/kitchen/bathroom area, with a steep staircase leading out.

    @Elizabeth — Your truth is most strong in the last line; I don’t think the current owners dream of mixed use, rather see a formula of n bedrooms X whatever the going rate is ($110?).
    Slightly related thought — how much of some of this is landlords, versus real estate agents and property managers governing the thought patterns of out-of-town investors. On that note, I’m often amused at those left holding the baby on some of the worst new student dwellings from the 90s. Six only just big enough rooms, paper thin walls, attracted great rents when they were new, and I suspect often on-sold on that basis to people who simply saw the yield but not the building. Wouldn’t be surprised if a few of them are leaky building candidates either… (the dwellings not the investors)

  23. David M

    When I was a student looking for flats around 1997-2000 most kept well clear of these houses because they had a reputation for being damp, cold, and hazardous to your health. Not the sort of place your mum would want to see you living in. The fact they are poky didn’t come up so much, though doubtless it was another turn off. Some money and imagination could make them very attractive, even with some remaining pokiness, as the location is so good.

    • Elizabeth

      ### ODT Online Thu, 10 Feb 2011
      Work on historic roof sparks consent warning
      By John Lewis
      “Ignorance is no defence”, and those who carry out work on historic buildings without the appropriate resource consents could be fined hundreds of thousands of dollars or imprisoned, the Dunedin City Council has warned.

      [Council resource consents manager Alan Worthington said] Mr Donnelly could be asked to get a resource consent after the fact, and he could also be asked to remove the roofing iron and replace it with slate tiles similar to those removed on Tuesday.

      Read more

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Thu, 10 Feb 2011
        Regent yields clues to early Octagon fire
        By Debbie Porteous
        Archaeologists assessing the excavation of the orchestra pit during renovations of Dunedin’s Regent Theatre have found some relics of yesteryear.
        Read more

        • Elizabeth

          Tweet:

          @restorm Preservation & restoration of historic sites: Download new manual. http://bit.ly/gJ6mJ3

          (National Trust for Historic Preservation, USA)

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Sat, 12 Feb 2011
          Garrison Hall’s fate lamented
          By Eileen Goodwin
          The loss of the Garrison Hall in Port Chalmers is “demolition by neglect”, local historian John Neilson says. The hall, built in 1887, once farewelled Boer War troops, and was a relic of when Port Chalmers had a significant military presence, fellow local historian Ian Church said. The Dunedin City Council is pulling the hall down early next month.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          DCC is right to be a ‘later’ resort. Dunedin boasts a number of individuals, agencies and businesses that could foot a business plan for the group. The group has always struggled to see the operations side of its project, a common problem for restoration groups. They do the hard work and often don’t have strong links into the business community at the level required to develop viability.

          ### ODT Online Sat, 12 Feb 2011
          Ferry restoration running dry
          By David Loughrey
          The organisation working to restore historic harbour ferry Elsie Evans is struggling to get the final $55,000 it needs to finish the job, after raising nearly $380,000. While volunteers have attracted almost $50,000 from the Dunedin City Council, deputy mayor Chris Staynes this week said the council was not keen to provide more help until the vessel was in the harbour.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          More outrage generated by the authorities concerned. If Syd Brown wants to flow SUBSTANTIAL new funds to the stadium between now and the opening of RWC 2011, rather than have DCC assume ownership of this historic bridge to enhance community amenity at Ravensbourne, then follow Egypt’s cue.

          ### ODT Online Sat, 12 Feb 2011
          Dispute over rare bridge reignited
          By Chris Morris
          A fresh wrangle has broken out over ownership of a dilapidated pedestrian footbridge in Ravensbourne, amid fears the old structure could once again be facing demolition. The bridge – believed to be one of the last in New Zealand to feature an Edwardian lattice-truss design – crosses the main railway line at Ravensbourne.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Mon, 14 Feb 2011
          Old post office still sitting idle
          By Chris Morris
          Questions are being asked about delays finalising plans for the vacant 133-year-old former post office on the reserve next to Otago Museum. The Dunedin City Council-owned building – built in 1878 – has been sitting vacant for more than three years, since the Otago Art Society quit the site to move to the Dunedin Railway Station.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Fri, 18 Feb 2011
          View historic bridge will be saved
          By Chris Morris
          A pedestrian footbridge at Ravensbourne seems set to escape demolition, despite the Dunedin City Council voting not to accept ownership of it for now, a city councillor says. Cr Andrew Noone said he would contact KiwiRail staff to confirm the bridge would not be removed, and expected the findings of a council working party formed last week would eventually lead to the council taking ownership of the bridge.
          Read more

          ****

          Report – ISC – 08/02/2011 (PDF, 120.3 KB, new window)
          Ravensbourne Footbridge

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Wed, 16 Mar 2011
          Committee votes to take on bridge
          By Chris Morris
          Dunedin city councillors have voted to accept ownership of a historic but dilapidated pedestrian footbridge at Ravensbourne, as well as a $274,000 repair bill. The move comes after a council working party chaired by Cr Andrew Noone made four recommendations to yesterday’s infrastructure services committee meeting.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Fri, 25 Mar 2011
          Bluestone foundation unchanged
          By Debbie Porteous
          Just when a crumbling bluestone foundation, ordered saved from demolition during the building of a new car park beside Dunedin’s Scenic Hotel Southern Cross, will be restored and preserved is a mystery. The remains of the foundation were to be left standing as a condition of the consent and archaeological approval to demolish buildings formerly on the High St site.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          The footbridge, featuring Edwardian lattice-truss steelwork, was believed to be one of the only examples of its kind remaining in New Zealand.

          ### ODT Online Tue, 30 Aug 2011
          Two more months before bridge opens
          By Chris Morris
          The prolonged closure of a dilapidated but historic footbridge at Ravensbourne is coming to an end, with work under way to reopen it to the public. Contractors working for the Dunedin City Council began work on the footbridge last week, and were expected to complete the $96,000 refurbishment by the end of October, council contract engineer Chris Hasler said.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Wed, 14 Mar 2012
          ‘Landmark’ foot bridge reopens after upgrade
          By David Loughrey
          The Edwardian lattice-truss steelwork footbridge across the railway line at Ravensbourne, in Dunedin, has reopened. Closed since 2009, the “significant landmark” would again provide safe crossing, Chalmers Community Board chairwoman Jan Tucker said, after a wet but successful re-opening ceremony at the weekend.
          Read more

  24. Phil

    There was an accessibility issue with regard to the post office on the museum grounds, from memory. I think that, when Parks owned the building, they had difficultly getting building consent on the basis of a lack of accessible access, fire egress, and acccessible toilets. In order to comply, they would have run foul of heritage orders. In the end I think they simply handed it over to City Property. That was a few years ago though.

    • Elizabeth

      Will make inquiries, likely at NZHPT in the morning to get building dates for another site.

      The only protection on the building is via the District Plan, “entire external building envelope”.

      Dunedin City District Plan – Schedule 25.1

      Site No: B245
      Map No: 35
      Item: Otago Art Society/Dunedin North Post Office (Former)
      Address: 361 Great King Street
      Legal Description: Pt Lot 1 DP 10554 – Local Purpose Reserve, NZG 1987, p.5674
      NZHPT Registration No: 2154
      NZHPT Category: II
      Protection Required & Comments: entire external building envelope

  25. Daniel

    Who is doing the CP for that one? You’d of thought it was University owned or least could be used by the Uni such a charming building. Any idea who the original architect was?

    {Suggest you approach Otago Museum to find the author of the Conservation Plan. The Plan will be used to guide the Museum’s development plans for the building. The history of this site (361 Great King St) and the neighbouring properties is fascinating. What remains in the area is the merest shadow of North Dunedin’s once bustling community hub. -Eds}

  26. Elizabeth

    Today at ODT Online: Delay over Process – see comment at Prista Apartments, 372-392 Princes St and 11 Stafford St

    ****

    ### ODT Online Wed, 9 Mar 2011
    Long closure for Otago Settlers Museum favoured
    By John Gibb
    The Otago Settlers Museum could be completely closed for at least 18 months, with its 17 full-time employees remaining on staff. The Dunedin City Council-owned museum’s board favours effectively closing the complex until its $35 million redevelopment is completed late next year.
    Read more

    ****

    ### ODT Online Wed, 9 Mar 2011
    Dredge owner considers options
    By David Loughrey
    The future of Te Whaka, the 101-year-old steam vessel that has been a near-derelict resident of Dunedin wharves since the mid-1990s, may become clearer in the next few weeks.
    Read more

    • Elizabeth

      ### ODT Online Wed, 30 Mar 2011
      Acceptance of closure by museum
      By John Gibb
      Dunedin tourist operator Steve McNulty is disappointed the Otago Settlers Museum will close for up to 18 months, but understands why it is happening. Dunedin city councillors this week decided that the museum would close from May 1 until its $35 million redevelopment project was completed and a “grand reopening” staged next year.
      Read more

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Thu, 31 Mar 2011
        Explaining shutdown a priority
        By John Gibb
        Otago Settlers Museum organisers plan to work hard explaining the looming 18-month closure of the institution to the public, including by using banners. The Dunedin City Council this week decided the closure would start on May 1.
        Read more

        ODT 31.3.11 Settlers museum to explore development of chindogu

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Fri, 8 Apr 2011
          Museum storage facility floods
          By John Lewis
          A burst boiler pipe spewed thousands of litres of water into the Otago Settlers Museum new collections store yesterday, but a major catastrophe was averted. Exhibitions team leader Jennifer Evans said the flood was discovered at 7am, but swift action by the museum’s emergency response team meant damage was minimal.
          Read more

          ****

          ### ch9.co.nz April 8, 2011 – 7:09pm
          Systems protect collections after flood
          The systems in place to protect collections at the Otago Settlers Museum are being praised after a potentially devastating flood yesterday. Cleaning staff discovered huge pools of water in the museum’s storage rooms early in the morning, and since then it’s been all hands to the pump.
          Read more

  27. Peter

    Let’s pass the donation bucket around for poor Earl.

  28. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Tue, 19 Apr 2011
    New roof slates to follow original design
    By John Gibb
    Slate roofs will be brought back to the University of Otago’s historic professorial houses, in keeping with the original design, as part of a maintenance and restoration project. The new roof tiles would be arranged according to the original colour pattern, which had been identified through photographs in the Hocken Library, university property services officials said.
    Read more

  29. Elizabeth

    By the City Architects Office, oops, a consortium of interests…

    ### ODT Online Thu, 19 May 2011
    All revealed in loco’s new glass home
    By John Gibb
    A locomotive viewing shed, just south of the Dunedin Railway Station, will be built next year to attract thousands of new visitors to the redeveloped Otago Settlers Museum.
    Read more

    • Elizabeth

      ### ODT Online Fri, 20 May 2011
      Bell-bottoms for museum?
      By John Gibb
      Yellow bell-bottom trousers from the 1970s, and stranger garb, could end up in Otago Settlers Museum collections, after a change in collecting policy is implemented.
      Read more

      • Elizabeth

        The festival opening on August 5 will reveal a luxurious theatre that highlights the best of the past while being well-equipped for the future.

        ### ODT Online Fri, 27 May 2011
        ‘Hive of industry’ as Regent rebuilds
        By Brenda Harwood
        Redevelopment at the Regent Theatre has reached fever-pitch with just 10 weeks remaining before the doors reopen for the first public event in 10 months – the International Film Festival. With the major construction work all but complete, lead contractor Amalgamated Builders Ltd (ABL) and waves of specialist contractors have moved into the finishing phase of the $7.6 million project.
        Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Mon, 1 Aug 2011
          Curtain raised at Regent
          By Rebecca Fox
          All those who supported or pitched in for the Regent Theatre’s $7.5 million redevelopment enjoyed a “thank you concert” on Saturday night.

          A huge fundraising push was made last year, led by the Otago Daily Times’ sister publication, Dunedin community newspaper The Star, to raise the final $2 million needed for the upgrade.

          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ch9.co.nz August 1, 2011 – 8:23pm
          Concert held to thank contributors
          A concert was held on Saturday night at the Regent Theatre to thank all those who had contributed towards its $7.5 million dollar redevelopment. Mayor Dave Cull praised the enormous community effort achieved by raising the funds in such a short period of time, and called it an ‘outstanding result’.
          Video

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Tue, 7 Jun 2011
        Wrapping up library to protect $25m collection
        By Ellie Constantine
        The Dunedin Public Library is wrapping up against the chill of winter to protect $25 million worth of its assets. Insulation is being installed on the exterior of the third floor around a section of the library’s heritage collection. Heritage collection librarian Lorraine Johnston said condensation had “been an ongoing problem” in the area since a portion of the third floor was enclosed in a fire cell about seven years ago.
        Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Sat, 11 Jun 2011
          Heritage books valued at $25m
          By Ellie Constantine
          Captain Cook, Gabriel Read and William Larnach all feature, but many Dunedin residents will not know the significance of what is housed within the Dunedin City Library. The library’s heritage collection was recently valued at $25 million, much to the delight of head of collection services Linda Geddes. “It’s significant for the city and it’s a significant heritage collection in New Zealand,” she said.
          Read more

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Fri, 24 Jun 2011
        Matanaka site reopens
        The historic Matanaka farm buildings at Waikouaiti have reopened to the public. They were closed in May after severe northwest winds brought down trees in the car park area and along the track leading to the buildings on the first farm in Otago.
        Read more

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Fri, 1 Jul 2011
        $700,000 to rehouse locomotive
        By Allison Rudd
        Moving the last steam locomotive built in Dunedin about 200m and building a new glass display shed for it will cost $700,000, the Dunedin City Council said. Lund South had won the contract to move Ja 1274 from the Otago Settlers Museum to its new resting place on the public car park about 20m south of the Dunedin Railway Station, council city life manager Graeme Hall said yesterday. The 146-tonne locomotive is the 35th and last of its class built at Dunedin’s Hillside Railway Workshops between 1946 and 1956. It has been on display since 1975. It did not belong to the settlers museum but was donated to the citizens of Dunedin, Mr Hall said.
        Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Thu, 7 Jul 2011
          Beneath change, town remains the same
          By John Lewis
          To the naked eye, much has changed about Port Chalmers in the past century. But beneath the smell of pine woodchips, the sound of rumbling container trucks and the sight of cruise ships with a multicultural melting pot of tourists, the foundations of the seaside community remain the same. For more than 81 years, Port Chalmers has been home to Otago Daily Times shipping writer Doug Wright (81).
          Read more

          Port Chalmers (via ODT)
          •Maori name is Koputai.
          • Population: About 3000.
          • In 1844, Captain Wing anchored the Deborah in what is now called Deborah Bay, where he was joined by Frederick Tuckett who selected an adjoining block of land (the Otago block) as the site for the Scottish New Edinburgh settlement. He nominated Koputai as its deep water port to be called Port Chalmers after the Presbyterian Free Church leader Thomas Chalmers.
          • The town was surveyed by Charles Kettle in 1846 and a town board was formed.
          • John Wickliffe and Philip Laing, carrying the first settlers, anchored at Port Chalmers in March and April 1848.

        • Elizabeth

          ### ch9.co.nz July 8, 2011 – 7:56pm
          Electric tramcar $40,000 closer to reality
          The Rotary Club of Dunedin East has given a $40,000 cheque to the Otago Settlers Museum, to help restore New Zealand’s first electric tramcar. Work on the Roslyn Number 1 tram will start next week in Christchurch, and hopefully be finished for exhibition when the Museum re-opens next November.
          Video

        • Elizabeth

          The event can be watched through the museum’s new webcam, which can be accessed through its website, http://www.otago.settlers.museum

          ### ODT Online Tue, 19 Jul 2011
          Locomotive ready to be moved
          By Nigel Benson
          One of the slowest and most expensive train trips in history starts in Dunedin this week. But there will be no passengers aboard when locomotive Ja 1274 makes a $700,000 journey north from its home at the Otago Settlers’ Museum. The 146-tonne locomotive, which has been on display at the museum since 1975, will be moved 100m to a custom-built 6m high glass viewing enclosure. Contractor, Fulton Hogan, started laying track yesterday in preparation to pull Ja 1274 from its home either tomorrow or Thursday.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODTV Online Fri, 22 Jul 2011
          Grand old engine sees sunlight again
          By Nigel Benson
          Trainspotters made tracks for the Otago Settlers Museum in Dunedin yesterday to see a historic railway engine rolling for the first time in nearly 40 years. Ja 1274 was the last steam locomotive made in New Zealand, at Dunedin’s Hillside railway workshops in 1956, and has been displayed at the museum since 1975. Railway enthusiasts and curious spectators lined up yesterday to see the engine being moved towards its new home, 50m south of the Dunedin Railway Station, as part of the $8.6 million museum redevelopment.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Sat, 23 Jul 2011
          Painstaking restoration
          By Eileen Goodwin
          Stained glass window artist Peter Mackenzie trims some of the stained glass panels he has made for the refurbishment of William Larnach’s tomb in Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery. Mr Mackenzie has spent a year painstakingly creating replicas of the original windows, using materials sourced from France and Australia. The originals had been destroyed by vandals, and it had taken a five-year hunt to track down architect R.A Lawson’s original designs.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Wed, 27 Jul 2011
          First Church repairs may cost thousands
          By Debbie Porteous
          Damage to a stone wall surrounding Dunedin’s First Church may cost thousands to repair.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Thu, 28 Jul 2011
          Council ponders remedy for port
          By David Loughrey
          Concerns Port Chalmers heritage buildings are being damaged by the shaking they receive when heavy vehicles pass through the town’s centre will be voiced, but when, to whom, and how, is yet to be decided. At the end of a lengthy Dunedin City Council debate on Tuesday, it was decided to gather more information so a more “diplomatic” and accurate approach could be made to the right authority.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Sat, 6 Aug 2011
          Old coach reveals full glory
          By John Gibb
          The true colours of a historic Cobb and Co stage coach have come shining through, thanks to cleaning work being undertaken during the Otago Settlers Museum’s $35 million redevelopment project.

          Exhibitions team leader Jennifer Evans said cleaning and conservation work had been continuing on a series of large items throughout the year. The museum’s distinctive, striped Tiger Tea bus, a trolley bus which began its service in Dunedin in 1951, has been fully cleaned, as have four cars, including a 1929 Austin 7 and a 1948 Morris 8…Work on several other items, including an early boat and a 19th-century fire engine, the Pride of Dunedin, will soon begin, so they can be moved into revamped galleries by October.

          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ch9.co.nz August 9, 2011 – 7:24pm
          Port Chalmers church receives Otago Community Trust grant
          The Otago Community Trust gave away just over $311,000 to more than 30 different organisations across the region last month. The biggest hand-out was a $150,000 donation to the iconic Iona Church in Port Chalmers.
          Video

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Sun, 4 Sep 2011
          More time needed to treat causeway
          By Chris Morris
          The historic pedestrian causeway unearthed during construction of Dunedin’s Wall Street mall needs almost another year of treatment before it is safely preserved. However, Dunedin City Council staff remain confident it will eventually emerge from tanks of treatment solution to be displayed at two separate locations – inside the Wall Street mall and Otago Settlers Museum – while a third piece is kept in storage.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Mon, 5 Sep 2011
          Museum may pay rent for building
          By Chris Morris
          The Dunedin City Council is looking to charge the Otago Museum rent for the still-vacant 133-year-old former post office building next door, despite continuing delays in refurbishing the building. The Dunedin City Council-owned building – built in 1878 – has been vacant for more than three years, since the Otago Art Society moved to the Dunedin Railway Station.
          Read more

          Report – CDC – 07/09/2011 (PDF, 468.8 KB)
          Otago Museum Lease of Former North Dunedin Post Office Building – Request to Defer Date for Development Works

        • Elizabeth

          Cr Syd Brown is correct. Nitwit councillors who know nothing about heritage conservation at the business end, yet who claim they should be on ‘heritage’ committees, should be led out and….

          ****

          ### ODT Online Mon, 19 Sep 2011
          Museum wins reprieve over old post office
          By Chris Morris
          The Otago Museum has won a reprieve from a looming deadline by which it was supposed to refurbish and reopen the 133-year-old former post office building next door. That was despite one Dunedin city councillor expressing disappointment at delays upgrading the heritage building, and calls by another for the building to be offered to a community group instead.

          Cr Syd Brown said the museum was spending a “considerable” amount of money to upgrade the heritage building, with input from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust and a heritage architect. Any other organisation wanting to use it would also need to spend “major” amounts of money making it safe and code-compliant.

          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          And still, former City Architect Robert Tongue prowls City Hall for the “architectural statement” to mark his legacy to the city… not sure where architects Baker Garden sit with all this…

          ### ODT Online Thu, 22 Sep 2011
          Costings being sought for Settlers’ tower
          By John Gibb
          Costings are being sought from contractors to add a controversial new viewing tower to the $35 million Otago Settlers Museum redevelopment project, but the tower seems unlikely to proceed. Documents obtained by the Otago Daily Times, and dated last month, show a building firm has been seeking costings from subcontractors for the construction of stage 4 of the redevelopment, which involves the development of a new northern entrance and redeveloped atrium, foyer, and shop area.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Wed, 12 Oct 2011
          Listed building
          The Otago Museum complex, including new sections, is to be classified as a category 1 building, of national heritage significance, by the Historic Places Trust.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ch9.co.nz November 3, 2011 – 6:23pm
          Burnside Buildings refurbishment nearly complete
          Refurbishment of the Burnside Buildings at the Otago Settlers’ Museum is nearly complete, which represents stage three of the redevelopment process. The Museum was recently awarded with $578,000 by the Lottery Grants Board, which will fit out the entire museum with display cases for exhibits.
          Video

          —-

          ### ODT Online Thu, 3 Nov 2011
          Museum hails grant
          By John Gibb
          A $578,000 grant from the Lottery Grants Board has provided a “huge boost” to Otago Settlers Museum redevelopment fundraising efforts, museum director Linda Wigley says. The grant, which was announced at a museum board meeting yesterday, will fund state-of-the-art exhibition cases for the redeveloped museum.
          Read more

          ### ODT Online Tue, 18 Oct 2011
          Savings of $3m identified at settlers museum
          By Chris Morris
          The Dunedin City Council is to seek a deal that could shave $3 million off the cost of the Otago Settlers Museum redevelopment. The council had budgeted $7.5 million to complete stage four of the museum’s redevelopment, which included a new entrance foyer, shop and display area for the steam locomotive Josephine. However, a council staff report to yesterday’s finance, strategy and development committee meeting confirmed savings of $3 million had been identified after tenders came in lower than expected.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Mon, 5 Dec 2011
          Marital stability restored
          By Ellie Constantine
          After 11 years of fundraising and hard work, Quarantine Island’s married quarters building is looking better than ever – well, at least on the outside. An island open day was held on Saturday to celebrate the completion of exterior work on the 138-year-old building.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Sun, 10 Jan 2016
          Past alive in heart of the harbour
          By Craig Borley
          An island [Quarantine Island/Kamau Taurua] given over to the sick and dying is coming back to life as teams of volunteers put their skill, sweat and time into its transformation. From 1860 until it was closed in 1924, Quarantine Island in Otago Harbour served to isolate immigrants and returning soldiers who had been exposed to disease. In its heyday the quarantine station included married quarters, single women’s quarters, a dining complex and a keeper’s cottage.
          Read more + Images

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Tue, 20 Dec 2011
          Cultural asset recognised
          By John Gibb
          The Otago Museum has been recognised as a category 1 historic place by the Historic Places Trust and the two organisations plan to collaborate more. The museum’s collection was of international, national and regional significance, and category 1 was the trust’s highest register listing, New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago-Southland area manager Owen Graham said yesterday.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Thu, 23 Feb 2012
          Settlers Museum plans revealed
          By John Gibb
          Final plans for a sunny and attractive new foyer and entranceway at the Otago Settlers Museum are starting to take shape as the $38 million museum redevelopment project moves closer to completion. It had been hoped to open the redeveloped museum in mid-November but the schedule was looking tight and late November now seemed a more likely date, museum director Linda Wigley said yesterday.

          Concept plans for the new-look foyer interior, developed by Hierarchy Architecture, in Christchurch, were tabled at yesterday’s Settlers Museum board meeting.

          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Thu, 17 May 2012
          Museum extras cost council $2.16m
          By Allison Rudd
          Ratepayers will fork out up to an extra $2.16 million to fund necessary work not included in original $39.2 million Otago Settlers Museum redevelopment project budget. Dunedin City councillors agreed yesterday to allocate the museum the money it needed to complete exhibitions and other components in time for the reopening of the museum in November next year.
          Read more

          Key unfunded items (via ODT)
          • Kai Tahu Wahi Pou Pou (decorative structure), Maori exhibition information station, digital projection display, and construction and display of mokihi (waka)
          • Interactive kiosks in Smith Portrait Gallery
          • Interactive wall to screen photographic images of 1870s Dunedin
          • Manuka walkway display
          • Military exhibition area
          • Display cases for 20th century timeline
          • Interactive display for NZR bus foyer
          • Dunedin scene exhibition
          • Temporary exhibitions gallery
          • Tiger Tea bus interactive experience
          • Mechanical interactive displays, labels, display case lighting, seating
          • Research centre
          • Retail shop

          Source: Otago Settlers Museum

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Mon, 13 Aug 2012
          $106,335 so far for causeway
          By Chris Morris
          The Dunedin City Council faces a six-figure bill for conserving the remains of a manuka causeway unearthed in Dunedin. The pedestrian causeway – believed to date to the 1850s – was described as a find of national significance when discovered during excavations for the Wall Street shopping mall in May 2008.[…]After a long wait, it was finally confirmed last month parts of the remaining causeway were expected to be ready for display by next month, and the rest by early next year.
          Read more

  30. Elizabeth

    Another significant historic heritage restoration project in the offing.

    ### ODT Online Fri, 10 Jun 2011
    Marinoto’s last resident moves out after 42 years
    By Allison Rudd
    Dunedin’s historic Marinoto is a convent no more. The 133-year-old bluestone mansion housed Sisters of Mercy for more than 40 years, but this week, its sole remaining resident, Sister Chanel Hardiman, moved out.
    In 2008, the Mercy Hospital Board announced plans to restore Marinoto over several years and furnish it in Victorian style. Board chairman Trevor Scott said this week the project, estimated to cost at least $2 million, was not linked to Sister Chanel moving out. Restoration had not yet begun, he said. “It’s a costly exercise and we are going through the process of justifying the expense.” However, the house had been “totally weatherproofed” and a conservation architect had drawn up a restoration plan, he said.
    Read more

    • Elizabeth

      ### ch9.co.nz June 15, 2011 – 7:32pm
      Restoration work on Larnach’s Tomb proceeds in spite of poor weather
      The project to restore the tomb of William Larnach and his family has been underway in earnest since October, following many years of discussion. Not even today’s inclement weather could prevent cranes carrying out significant work on the $300,000 project.
      Video

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Fri, 17 Jun 2011
        Hocken acknowledges valuable gifts
        By Rebecca Fox
        A painting by Charles Goldie, photographs, a blues blazer and glass plate negatives form just some of recent donations to the Hocken Library. They were celebrated at a function at the library last night to thank those who had given to the institution.

        Among the given were glass plate negatives depicting interior views of New Zealand’s first international exhibition in Dunedin in 1865, rated as three of the most significant images to come into the library’s photograph collection in the last decade. They were given by a descendant of Alfred Eccles, the main organiser of the exhibition and came with labelled wrappings in his son’s hand.

        Read more

    • Elizabeth

      ### ODT Online Tue, 1 Nov 2011
      High-tech tool gives a new view on old castle ruins
      By Eileen Goodwin
      A high-tech scanning tool much-used in Britain gave Dunedin heritage experts a new perspective on Cargill’s Castle yesterday. The all-day session offered to the Cargill’s Castle Trust doubled as a training opportunity for Opus staff to use the terrestrial laser scan. Three-dimensional scanning was extremely useful to explore potentially unsafe sites, New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago Southland area manager Owen Graham said.
      Read more

  31. Daniel

    sisters of mercy, who is doing the conservation plan on that one?

    • Elizabeth

      Not sure – you’ll need to make enquiries with NZHPT about Marinoto House, or contact the owners directly.

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Sat, 18 Jun 2011
        Flying finial
        By Tegan McKnight
        Four replacement stone finials – decorative carved ornaments topping spires – were lifted into place on the Larnach tomb at Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery this week.
        Read more

  32. Daniel

    If South Island heritage wasn’t suffering enough. It’s bad enough mother nature destroying heritage never mind some moron.
    D

  33. Daniel

    nitwit councillors who know anything about conservation at any end would be a start.

  34. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Tue, 17 Jan 2012
    Historic church on the market
    By Nigel Benson
    One of Dunedin’s most prominent churches has been placed on the market. The former Roslyn Presbyterian Church is for sale by negotiation, after it became surplus to requirements when the Maori Hill and Roslyn parishes combined in 2005 to become the Highgate Presbyterian Church.
    Read more

  35. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Sat, 21 Jan 2012
    Regions
    Ultimate satisfaction using traditional methods
    By Lucy Ibbotson
    Central Otago heritage stonemason Keith Hinds says the role he plays in preserving the past brings him the ultimate job satisfaction. […] Mr Hinds (60), a St Bathans resident for 27 years, works full-time restoring and stabilising old buildings and structures throughout the district, mainly for the Historic Places Trust and private owners.
    Read more

    The practices of such work were governed by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), which is an international non-governmental organisation of heritage professionals involved in the conservation of the world’s historic monuments and sites.

    Hotel ruins stabilisation completed

    • Elizabeth

      ### ch9.co.nz January 20, 2012 – 6:24pm
      Noticeable bulge shows on a historically significant blue stone wall
      A potentially historically significant blue stone wall on the corner of Smith and Stuart Streets has developed a noticeable bulge. A shipping container is in place to divert foot traffic and offer support to the wall. The property the wall is situated on is owned by Night’n Day Foodstores. Director Andrew Lane says a new retaining wall will be constructed once engineers complete designs. Lane says at this stage it’s not yet known what caused the bulge, and fixing it will require part of the wall to be taken apart brick by brick. Once the wall is dismantled an archaeologist will inspect the site, reinforcing will take place, and it is likely the original bluestone bricks will be re-used in their original position.
      Video

  36. Elizabeth

    “Years ago, the thought was that the best thing that could happen was wait for the church [and other buildings on the site] to fall down and build new ones. But that thinking has changed. It is nice to see new life coming back to old buildings.” -Sean Toomey

    ### ODT Online Tue, 21 Feb 2012
    New life for historic buildings
    By Allison Rudd
    A quaint school building more than 90 years old will be renovated and reused in stage one of a $2.6 million redevelopment of the St Patrick’s Basilica site in South Dunedin. Part of the former St Patrick’s School building, opened in 1917, is already being used as parish offices, but a total overhaul will see the building used as the Dunedin base for Catholic Social Services and as a community centre offering welfare programmes to South Dunedin residents.
    Read more

  37. Hype O'Thermia

    New-look? It’s typical shop-fitters’ “stylish individuality”. Doesn’t have any reference to the function of the institution – [early] Settlers stuff, ways of life, artefacts, traditions from “home” and how they survived / morphed / cross-bred in NZ, Otago in particular.

  38. Anne Elliot

    I noted that the glass tower idea is gone. Thank goodness! Could have been another eyesore.

  39. Tomo

    Not a bad price for a load of old firewood

    • Elizabeth

      This has to be one of the most stupid and vacuous heritage advocacy projects out, it’s a laughing stock. Worse, we get told on 9 June 2012 at ODT Online that City Property is getting an 8.2% return on investment with Wall Street, read $2.6 million per annum (noting debate on whether this is Nett – after all deductions…).

      And the DCC scrubbers have sought / been offered (processing, I understand) $10,000 from a bequest fund (community funds) administered by NZHPT, towards the $106,335. AN OUTRAGE. WHAT IS DILIGENCE.

      I hope someone involved is prepared to tell me I’m wrong about this.

  40. Peter

    Yes, while admittedly not being fully acquainted with the historical significance of this stick causeway, I would have thought the $106,335 would have been better used for helping owners of actual heritage buildings around town. The visual impact would have been greater on the cityscape than preserving a bunch of sticks. Not sure how this project got legs in the first place.

  41. Calvin Oaten

    I obtained under the LGOIMA a list from City Property, of non strategic investment properties and Wall Street was shown to have a gross rental stream of $3.467m pa. We have been subsequently told (ODT, 9 June) that the property shows a return of 8.2% on investment. It is assumed that tenants pay all outgoings as standard so that $2.6m would capitalise the complex at $31.707m.
    Now the difference between the gross rental and the net is $867,000 and at 7% interest this would indicate debt at $12.385m. Does this matter, or would it be better to sell the complex and get out of competing with our own ratepayers and use the net proceeds of $19.322m to reduce the DCC’s debt. The same process by extrapolation on the figures I was given, overall I reckoned that the total portfolio could realise around $100m to $115m available for debt reduction. I put that scenario to Mayor Cull in a detailed report. Needless to say, the response was nil.

    {Link added. -Eds}

    • Elizabeth

      ### DScene 15.8.12 (page 6)
      Showing the way forward
      By Owen Graham

      Last week the work of owner Lawrie Forbes in taking on the ‘‘hopeless’’ case of the former AH Reed building was profiled during a visit to Dunedin by Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage, Chris Finlayson. Anyone who has driven down Crawford Street and stopped at the Jetty St lights recently may well have marvelled at the ‘‘expose’’ going on, with the southern wall of the building now removed. That is just the kind of big concept rebuilding work sometimes needed to bring heritage buildings like these back into service. By no means is it the only work of its kind going on in Dunedin. Within one block, the 1882 former Donald Reid wool and grain store is being converted for use by a Dunedin-based technology company. This is a massive building and an undertaking most would not consider. What the redevelopment work has done however, is expose the solid kauri beams and columns and floors of this impressive warehouse building. Although formerly it may have been a very functional storage building, now its beauty and character is being revealed through the conversion. Not much further away, the Staveley Building, badly damaged by fire in 2008 and then neglected, has new owners and is stepping through its conversion into 11 apartments. This is a pioneering project for those involved, transforming this prominent corner building into another sign of rejuvenation and confidence in the future of the warehouse area. The work on this building sits in stark contrast to the empty car park beside it where once the Century Theatre stood. Dunedin City does not want to lose more of its heritage buildings in this Princes Street/Warehouse precinct. To do so would lay open the probability that, in the current economic times, we will end up with more car park wastelands. These projects are showing the way forward. Each has received incentive based funding from the Dunedin Heritage Fund, jointly administered by Dunedin City Council and NZ Historic Places Trust. These owners can be recognised further for their vision and commitment by the community supporting their initiatives and investing in the area.

      ● Owen Graham is the area manager Otago Southland, New Zealand Historic Places Trust

      Register to read D Scene online at
      http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

  42. Peter

    This area’s improvement is a celebration of optimism for Dunedin. And don’t we need it! We can at least thank the council, on this one, for letting it happen.
    It would be great if that Century Theatre site could be sympathetically redeveloped. The Chipmunks Building next door looks pretty awful and could do with a facelift. I wonder who owns that and whether they would consider doing something to improve the appearance of the building.

    • Elizabeth

      Peter – via DCC WebMap and Rates Information, and NZ Companies Office:

      361 Princes St, former Century Theatre site
      Ratepayers: Jon William Fergus and Lynley Pauline Fergus

      373 Princes St, Chipmunks building (formerly John Edmond’s)
      Ratepayer: Eccentricity Investments Limited

      Directors/Shareholders:
      Alexander Jon FERGUS, C/- 20a Korimako St, Dunedin 9022
      Appointment Date: 13 Jun 2003

      Jon William FERGUS, 20a Korimako Street, Saint Leonards, Dunedin 9022
      13 Jun 2003

      Lynley Pauline FERGUS, 20a Korimako Street, Saint Leonards, Dunedin 9022
      13 Jun 2003

  43. DaveM

    The old appearance of the Chipmunks (John Edmond) facade can be seen here: http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-Cyc04Cycl-t1-body1-d2-d36-d5.html

  44. Peter

    Thanks for that info Elizabeth and Dave. Amazingly beautiful frontage for the ‘Chipmunk’ Building. Nothing short of vandalism for what it was turned into.

  45. Anon1

    The building was significantly damaged by fire in 1977 and the current facade seems to date from that time.
    Link to photo of fire:

  46. I am thinking that we have found the next facade that needs to be reinstated on Princes Street, looks easy enough to achieve, easily within $100-$130K, including design, already better photographs available than the Standard building. Reinstating the facade would help put pressure on turning the vacant corner site of the old Century Theatre into a piece of modern architecture as well enhancing the value of the Prista apartment buildings opposite; a key corner historic site on Princes Street. Also there is probably no architecture like Edmond facade in town, maybe something a little similar in form in South Dunedin but not with that level of ornament. Very classic Dunedin style architecture. Dave keep digging for photos and I will fire the idea of this being the next Standard across DCC and HPT.

  47. DaveM

    The building was designed by W.T. Winchester in 1876. He was working in Dunedin as early as the 1850s and there aren’t many good examples of his work left (389 Princes Street is one). It looks as though it was facelifted around the 1940s and then again after the fire.

    • Elizabeth

      Source: Hardwicke Knight, Dunedin Early Photographs: Second Series from the Hardwicke Knight Collection (Dunedin: H. Knight, 1985). No copyright restriction.

      Supplied by DaveM

  48. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Thu, 16 Aug 2012
    Completion of $500,000 Exchange project pushed back
    By Debbie Porteous
    It will be another nine months before the restoration of the Cargill Monument in the Exchange is completed. The $500,000 project to restore the 148-year-old monument to Captain William Cargill, the first superintendent of Otago, was started in 2010 with the development of a conservation plan, after urgent stabilisation work was required in 2009.
    Read more

    • Elizabeth

      We await further information.

      ### ch9.co.nz August 16, 2012 – 6:36pm
      Work to begin on Dunedin’s Speight’s brewery
      Work is about to begin on the most intensive aspect of a $29m upgrade of Dunedin’s Speight’s brewery. It was revealed today the work will see major changes to the historic nineteenth Century building on Rattray Street. But the company says the work will open a window to the company’s history.
      Video

      ****

      Noticed this story has been fed in by the editor of DScene, likely meaning NZHPT has to do with the ‘release’ (BAD MASSAGE). Streetscape treatment (‘street wall’) of new development is poorly scaled and detailed if the graphic supplied can be believed. Yeah, add more glass. Yawn.


      Image via Stuff

      The redevelopment plans were drawn up with input from Dunedin City Council, Otago Regional Council and the Historic Places Trust.

      ### stuff.co.nz Last updated 17:30 16/08/2012
      Historic brewery gets upgrade
      By Mike Houlahan
      Speight’s historic Dunedin brewery is in for a $29 million make-over. Beer has been made at the Rattray Street premises since 1876. Production increased at the plant last May after owners Lion decided to close its earthquake-damaged Christchurch brewery, and plans were drawn up for further expansion on the Dunedin site. The first stage – relocation of the Maltexo plant from Christchurch – has been completed. Resource consent has now been granted for the bulk of the work, which will see the current sales offices demolished and the buildings behind it revamped. The plant will gain a new brewhouse, tank farm, new office space, and have its boilers and carbon dioxin collection facilities upgraded.
      Read more

      • Elizabeth

        Consent processed as non-notified by Dunedin City Council via City Planning (hello Mr Worthington) and the Paul Orders’ red carpet treatment. Wrong wrong wrong. Aided and abetted by ORC and NZHPT. This is the corrupt city you live in. “effects no more than minor” ? The bullshit continues.

        http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/221994/part-brewery-be-demolished-expansion

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Sat, 18 Aug 2012
        Questions over consent for Speight’s
        By Chris Morris
        Dunedin heritage advocates Peter Entwisle and Elizabeth Kerr questioned the council’s decision to grant consent without prior public notification, which would have led to public submissions and a hearing. Council documents released to the Otago Daily Times yesterday confirmed the non-notified consent was granted on July 17.
        Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ch9.co.nz August 20, 2012 – 6:49pm
          Christchurch company to start office in Dunedin
          A Christchurch company is set to start a head office in one of Dunedin’s heritage buildings.
          Video

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Tue, 21 Aug 2012
          Wine business considered for warehouse precinct
          By Chris Morris
          A businessman’s bid to leave the Christchurch earthquakes behind, in favour of Dunedin’s warehouse heritage precinct, has the backing of the Otago Chamber of Commerce.

          His year-long search for a premises had since led him back to Dunedin for the first time in 14 years, and to the Water St building he hoped to lease. However, his bid – originally a non-notified, non-public application – was against district plan rules, which zoned the Water St building for large-scale retail use, a report by council senior planner Kirstyn Lindsay said. His plans become public yesterday after council staff referred it to the hearings committee for an interpretation of district plan rules.

          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          Thinking Mr Worthington needs media training care of the new DCC Spooks department.

          ### ODT Online Wed, 22 Aug 2012
          Consent requirement ‘frustrating’
          By Chris Morris
          The owner of a Dunedin heritage building with more than a century of history as an office block says being forced to apply for resource consent to continue the tradition is “frustrating”. Stephen MacKnight has been told to seek consent for an office inside the NMA building at 49 Water St, 129 years after it began life as the Union Steam Ship Company office in 1883.
          Read more

          {Spelling of surname is “Macknight”, small k. This is easily checked. Director of Stephen Macknight Limited, Dunedin. -Eds}

        • Elizabeth

          Across the last days people have been sending me photos of the demolition underway at Speight’s, on Rattray St. Page 4 of the ODT today provides a compelling view of progress…
          http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/235563/somethings-brewing-speights-old-offices

          Needless to say I’ve been unearthing what happened with the non notified consent granted by Dunedin City Council. It turns out that the council decided – politically – to avoid treating the New Zealand Historic Places Trust as an affected party, despite the heritage status and protection afforded to the building complex in Schedule 25.1 of the Dunedin City District Plan, and the brewery’s location within the district plan listed North Princes Street/Moray Place/Exchange Townscape Precinct (TH03). Council proceeded to ramrod consent through without warning to the Trust with which it was in ‘discussion’. This is what Cull’s council regards as a democratic process, euphemistically referred to as f****** Red Carpet.

          Expect more of this corrupt behaviour as DCC’s chips fall, this is a financially desperate council.

          These words are mine and mine alone; they are in no way attributable to the heritage agency named above.

          The city council may wish to dispute this, however, the paperwork corroborates.

      • ### ODT Online Thu, 2 May 2013
        Speight’s upgrade on track for completion by year’s end
        By Vaughan Elder
        The $29 million site redevelopment at Speight’s brewery in Dunedin is on track to be completed by the end of this year, as planned. Lion external relations manager Jude Walter said contractors over the last week had begun work on the new 150,000 litre brew house by putting up seven concrete slabs. The equipment for the new brew house was on the way from Germany by ship and would be assembled on site soon. The brew house was expected to be operating in October, Ms Walter said. […] The project includes a new brew house, tank farm and upgraded boilers, new sales and office space, and the relocation from Canterbury of a keg plant.
        Read more

        Last year . . . [non-notified application, loss of oldest brewery building on site]

        ### ODT Online Fri, 17 Aug 2012
        Speight’s demolition to make way for expansion
        By Chris Morris
        Part of the Speight’s Brewery in Dunedin will be demolished to make room for the $29 million expansion of its operation. Detailed plans for stage two of the upgrade were presented to media yesterday by Lion representatives, including managing director Rory Glass. The company announced its intention to redevelop the brewery last year, after earthquake damage to the Canterbury Brewery, and began by relocating its Maltexo production plant to Dunedin in May this year. […] Details of the next – and final – phase of the project were released yesterday after Mr Glass confirmed non-notified resource consent had been granted by the Dunedin City Council.
        Read more

        ****

        ### ODT Online Sat, 18 Aug 2012
        Questions over consent for Speight’s
        By Chris Morris
        Heritage advocates are questioning why the public was not given a say about the demolition of a protected part of Speight’s Brewery in Dunedin.
        Read more

        • ### ch9.co.nz July 2, 2013 – 6:38pm
          Coal-fired boiler replaced
          Dunedin has seen the last of smoke and coal dust spewing from the chimney of a local brewery. Speight’s today announced it has installed a state-of-the-art LPG boiler to replace older coal-fired technology. The work is part of a multi-million dollar redevelopment, not all of which is obvious to the naked eye.
          Video

        • ### ODT Online Tue, 27 Aug 2013
          Refitted, new-look ale house
          By Rebecca Fox
          Earthquake strengthening of the historic Speight’s buildings in central Dunedin has been extended to include the ale house. Lion Nathan is earthquake strengthening the Rattray St buildings as part of the $29 million upgrade of its brewery. ”Seismic strengthening work has been under way for several months as part of the overall work being done at Speight’s brewery to ensure the whole site is future-proofed,” Lion Nathan spokeswoman Judy Walter said.
          Ms Walter said the redevelopment of the Speight’s site was on track for completion in December.
          Read more

        • Comment at ODT Online (arrived a day after it was submitted):

          Non-notified resource consent
          Submitted by ej kerr on Thu, 09/01/2014 – 3:36pm.

          DCC saw fit to non-notify the application to effectively leave the public out of the drive to retain the business at Dunedin. I can understand that, given what happened to the company in Christchurch and the decision to boost production at the Dunedin site, and the timelines involved. Nevertheless, too few affected parties were identified and consulted insodoing. The aesthetic outcome speaks for itself. I would have expected strong contemporary industrial design to front Rattray, instead we have the black box, and a billboard to arrive in the next while. Sigh. DCC refuses to establish an independent multidisciplinary urban design panel, although this is not always the answer either. However, without a City Architect there are no credible checks and balances on architectural design for strategic sites. Instead we have small-time players cutting deals incestuously with City Planning and our elected politicians.

        • ### dunedintv.co.nz February 25, 2014 – 7:14pm
          Upgraded Speight’s Brewery officially unveiled
          Speight’s Brewery’s $40m three year upgrade was officially unveiled this afternoon. The Rattray Street site redevelopment took place after the Canterbury earthquake damaged the Christchurch brewery. Lion owns the company, and says it had many options on where to expand the business following the quakes, but ultimately the decision was an easy one.
          Video

  49. Anonymous

    Noting the mention of Maltexo in that article reminded me that the Wickliffe St site is still undeveloped and finding “productive use” as a car park.

    • Elizabeth

      Once again, how convenient it is, to demolish after such racy graphics for proposed developments are publicly shared. There continue to be a frequent number of searches for Maltexo at this website.

  50. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Thu, 11 Oct 2012
    Historic synagogue for sale
    By Simon Hartley
    A historic 146-year-old Victorian building in Dunedin – once a synagogue and later a freemasons’ temple – is for sale, for the first time since its retrofitting about 20 years ago. Known as the Temple Gallery, the building in Moray Pl, Dunedin was home to the world’s southernmost synagogue and went on to become one of the largest freemasons’ temples in the country, according to Historic Places Trust research, which lists it as a category one building “of outstanding historical significance”.
    Read more
    http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/229794/historic-synagogue-sale

    ****

    In other news, DCC wants to take business away from existing retailers, I see, and undermine the force of the community owned District Plan that has properly kept an emphasis on George Street and the main shopping area. This is Cull the Ineffectual’s hobbyhorse/distraction for electioneering purposes. Precinct idea driven by one junior staffer for heritage, aided by the bought-in opinion of Kobus Mentz/Urbanismplus. Don’t ask how the Council’s finances are doing.

    http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/229666/warehouse-precinct-ideas-released
    http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/229665/no-funding-change-one-ways

  51. Anonymous

    Great news on the road change. It’s bad enough now at most times of the day without making horrifically worse and much more dangerous for pedestrians.

    Dunner Runner asks on ODT Online, “What kind of operation are they running at DCC?” Answer: One that works in the best interests of stakeholders. Not commonsense. Not Dunedin.

  52. Hype O'Thermia

    I wonder how the Disney Corporation feels about DCC having co-opted Mickey Mouse to oversee all decision-making processes?

  53. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Wed, 7 Nov 2012
    Significant birthday for store with Dunedin roots
    By Nigel Benson
    A Dunedin retailer which became a 41-store national chain marks its 150th birthday today. Homewares retailer Briscoes started out as a small shop in George St, Dunedin, in 1862. The company’s Otago origins are documented in a book released today, Briscoes: 150 Years in New Zealand, by Auckland business historian Ian Hunter.

    “While the Briscoes of today is best known for its popular household products, it began its life as a hardware retailer providing equipment like shovels, picks, tents and lanterns to prospectors during the Central Otago gold rush in the 1860s,” Dr Hunter said. “Full column advertisements in the Otago Daily Times promoted tools, oils, bedspreads, boilers, even sausage-machines – everything that a busy colonist would need, delivered direct from Melbourne. Briscoes brought the best manufactured goods of the world to our shores and became the first, international mercantile business to establish a presence in New Zealand.”
    Read more

  54. Elizabeth

    Updated post at top of thread.

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