Daily Archives: December 4, 2010

Old Logan Park Art Gallery

A great weekend feature in Otago Daily Times, thanks Kim!

### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
‘Fantastic compromise’ saves day
By Kim Dungey
The former Logan Park art gallery is a good example of how heritage significance is not just about pretty buildings, says Jackie Gillies, the architect who has prepared plans for the building’s refurbishment. Few people would use the word pretty to describe the building, a restrained design that was typical of the 1920s and a reaction against the fussy architecture of the late-Victorian era. But Ms Gillies says social and cultural significance are also important.

“In an ideal world, [the former gallery] would not have been reduced in size … But I’m quite excited about how the proximity of the building to the cricket oval will allow some absolutely amazing views through the building straight on to the cricket ground.”
–Jackie Gillies, conservation architect

“A real threat has been hanging over it for a long time … Thank God a few people knuckled down and saved it, and saved it in a way where everyone gets what they want.”
–John Blennerhasset, great-grandson of Percy Sargood

Read more + architectural graphics

### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
When the world came to Dunedin
If Dunedin’s leaders today announced they were going to stage an expo over 6.5ha and attract more than 3 million visitors, locals might think they were dreaming. But that’s exactly what happened in 1925 and the former Logan Park art gallery is a reminder. The gallery is the sole surviving building from the 1925-6 New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition, being the only structure built of permanent materials, for insurance reasons.
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### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
Sargoods’ gallery gift in memory of Gallipoli sacrifice
By Kim Dungey
The former Logan Park art gallery owes its survival to a wealthy Dunedin couple and events at Gallipoli. It was at Chunuk Bair that 22-year-old Lieutenant Cedric Rolfe Sargood, of the Otago Battalion, went missing in action in August 1915. A little more than a decade later, his parents, Percy and Lucy Sargood, approached the company which had staged the New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition with an offer to buy the exhibition’s art gallery for £4000. They then donated it to the city as a public art gallery in memory of their son.
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