Dunedin’s future – no sticky buns

UPDATED

### ODT Online Mon, 19 Jul 2010
Strategies for city’s future progressing
By David Loughrey
The future of Dunedin’s central city is to come under the microscope as the city council sets its sights on the future shape of the area that includes the prime retail zone. Early work on the central-city strategy, approved last week, will be developed alongside the South Dunedin retail centre strategy, with the two initiatives expected to play an important role in shaping the city’s future.
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Today, Dunedin City Council hosted the “Your City Our Future” Forum 2010 at the Dunedin Centre. Representatives from a large number of local communities, businesses and organisations were invited to brainstorm what their ideal Dunedin City would be in 30 years’ time.

It was good to see councillors participating in the group sessions!

Two presenters kicked off proceedings:

Political journalist Colin James considered the geo-political environment and the ‘big issues’ facing Dunedin with his presentation, ‘A very brief 30-year future scan’.

Architect and urban designer Anthony Flannery gave his presentation on ‘Futures Thinking: Considering spatial planning and sustainability’.

See tomorrow’s Otago Daily Times for more.

Mayor Peter Chin brought the forum to a close by talking about the skimpy morning tea and lunch provided for forum participants – he had been guided by an elected representative’s concern [about council spending and or credit card use?]. Unfortunate. The mayor needs a scriptwriter – oh, but he has one. Rodney?

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### ODT Online Wed, 21 Jul 2010
‘Small changes’ can improve Dunedin
By David Loughrey
Cities that made the most of links with their universities were cities that succeeded, a keynote speaker told a forum on the future of Dunedin yesterday. Presenting a well-designed city to the rest of the world was not only essential, but could be a simple process, the managing director of Auckland firm Chow Hill Architects, Anthony Flannery, said. The “Your City, Our Future” forum, at the Dunedin Centre, was the first meeting of a major Dunedin City Council consultation process to help decide the city’s future direction.
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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Design, Economics, Events, Geography, Hot air, People, Politics, Project management, Urban design

2 responses to “Dunedin’s future – no sticky buns

  1. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Wed, 21 Jul 2010
    Cohesive transport plan urged
    By Stu Oldham
    Special fares for unlimited trips, GPS-fed bus information and a radical change to make public transport a social good seem poised to electrify the race to the local body elections. Sustainable living and public transport advocates look likely to discuss a new and possibly co-ordinated strategy to make transport planning and provision an issue in the October council elections.
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  2. Peter

    The formula for better patronage of public transport is no secret. Competitive lower cost bus fares compared to the cost of taking the car, timetable frequency, appropriate bus routes, clean, comfortable buses and more bus shelters.
    The biggest incentive, however, will be a strong rise in the price of oil as a result of its shortage. (This is out of our control at a local level, of course) Remember what happened just a short time ago when the oil price peaked. People started using public transport a lot more. The price dropped and they got back in their cars. Until oil significantly rises in price, again, I think other measures will help, but not get people out of their cars and onto public transport in significant numbers. May I add clogged roads are a great boon for public transport – with open corridors set aside for buses/trains to overtake traffic!

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