Daily Archives: April 1, 2010

DCC Media Release – Octagon Trees

Dunedin City Council
Media Release

Octagon Trees Not At Death’s Door

A report received by the Dunedin City Council’s Community and Recreation Services from the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, indicate that the unhealthy plane trees in the Octagon show the presence of no primary pathogens and they are not, in fact, dead or dying. However, the trees appear to be susceptible to secondary pathogens, a weakness that may be due to their environment.

The report continues with suggestions for improving the health of the affected trees. While trees can heal and defend themselves against pathogens in an ideal environment, when planted in an urban situation, they need the soil environment to be actively maintained.

Suggestions in the report for future health of Dunedin’s street trees are based on three stages:

* Physical modifications such as removing surface plantings
* A change in maintenance practice – for example gentle or no pruning until they recover
* Therapeutic treatments such as addition of nutrients to the soil

The programme of work is yet to be finalised but will be non-chemical as there are no primary pathogens to kill.

DCC Community & Recreation Services Manager, Mick Reece, says, “This is good news albeit a bit of a wake up call for us. We now need to work out how to respond appropriately to achieve longevity for our city’s street trees while also considering the forward planning implications for having suitable replacement trees ready for planting in key areas and maybe with more urgency than previously anticipated.”

Mr Reece also commented that future urban design will have to investigate either which are the most suitable type of trees to be planted in these areas or, whether in fact trees are suitable for the Octagon at all. “We may also get to the situation where we are nursing some of these older affected trees for several years and they don’t improve and it may still be necessary to cut off the life support system.”

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

Last reviewed: 01 Apr 2010 3:58pm

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC media release – Harbourside

Dunedin City Council
Media release

Harbourside Progress

Dunedin (Thursday 1 April 2010) – The Council has been advised by the Chair of its Hearings Committee, Cr Colin Weatherall, as its negotiator, that a broad understanding, as a basis for resolving outstanding differences with the appellants to the Harbourside Plan Change 7 proposal, exists final details of which are still being negotiated.

Cr Weatherall has been engaged in discussions with all parties on a ‘confidential without prejudice’ basis in accordance with best practice while, for its part, the Council has maintained a position of not commenting while the appeals process is in train, relying instead on Cr Weatherall’s delegated authority.

At its meeting this Monday 29 March 2010 Cr Weatherall was authorised by the Council to continue to progress the Harbourside negotiations with all the appellants under a confidential protocol until such time as there is a consent order, agreed to by all parties, in place before the Environment Court for its approval.

The purpose of these negotiations is to minimise the matters brought before the Court for its consideration.

The chair of the Council’s Hearings Committee has delegated authority to authorise the negotiation and resolution of appeals under the Resource Management Act.

Given that this process is both on-going and sensitive it is inappropriate for anyone other than the Chair of the Council’s Hearings Committee to make any public comment on how the process is proceeding until such negotiations are completed.

A chronological background, outlining the time-line for realising the Harbourside vision and the resulting Plan Change, follows.

BACKGROUND

The following outlines the time line in developing the harbourside vision and the resulting plan change:

2001:
Consultation on options for Dunedin’s future through “Choices for the Future” in 2001, the community expressed a desire for improved harbour access for both people and vehicles to get to the water, and to enhance harbour amenity.

June 2002:
The Planning and Environment Committee approved a variation to the then Proposed District Plan to provide for the harbourside area.

July 2005:
Draft long term vision for Dunedin’s harbourside launched for public consultation. The vision was refined, options considered and a plan change initiated to facilitate development.

October 2006:
A revised vision and a draft consultation document summarising the principles to be embodied in the plan change were agreed for informal consultation.

October 2007:
The Council resolved to publicly notify Proposed Plan Change 7 and the Notices of Requirement, along with a private plan change to the Regional Plan: Coast.

January 2008:
Proposed District Plan Change 7: Dunedin harbourside was notified alongside six Notices of Requirement to designate land for public squares, walkways and a road alignment included in the Harbourside vision. A decision was subsequently taken, prior to the hearings and in light of concerns raised by submitters, to withdraw three of the designations (No’s 2-4) and to limit the extent of the designation relating to 41 Wharf Street.

The objectives of Plan Change 7 include a Dunedin harbourside that:
• is easily accessible with strong visual and safe physical connections to the city centre, harbour and surrounding areas.
• is a vibrant and attractive place to visit, work and live, with public open spaces along the harbour edge creating a high quality waterfront environment.
• supports a range of compatible land uses that enable the continued operation of Dunedin Port and complement, but do not compete with the vibrancy and vitality of the city centre.
• built form of development creates a liveable environment that reflects and enhances the industrial, maritime and port heritage.

July 2008:
The hearings on Proposed Plan Change 7: Dunedin harbourside and three Notices of Requirement (Fairley Street walkway – northern and southern sections, and 41 Wharf Street roading improvement) were held.

January 2009:
Decisions were released by the Commissioners confirming Plan Change 7 (both Stage 1 and 2) and the designation of the Fairley Street walkway, with modifications. A decision on 41 Wharf Street is yet to be made.

April 2009:
Eight appeals were received on Plan Change 7, two appeals on the Fairley Street walkway – southern section and one appeal on the Fairley Street walkway – northern section. There are also a number of section 274 parties to the proceedings.

PLEASE NOTE: Any further comment on this media statement will be available from the Mayor, Peter Chin, only.



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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin City public art: “susceptibility to decay and damage”

An honest if contrived conceptual work that carries its themes well.

### ODT Online Thu, 1 Apr 2010
Dental fixture still to be polished
By David Loughrey
Regan Gentry’s problems with his wisdom teeth while studying at the Otago Polytechnic, along with Dunedin’s dental school, heritage buildings and harbour mouth, were all inspirations for the artist’s striking new installation in Portsmouth Dr. Harbour Mouth Molars comprises six large wisdom teeth constructed from concrete and Oamaru stone, each weighing 6.5 tonnes, and paid for by the Dunedin City Council under its art in public places programme.
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Related post:
24.2.10 DCC Art in Public Places: New work commissioned

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Project management, Urban design

April 1 2010

ODT reporters are kepy busy with creative writing courses on slow news days in the city.

### ODT Online Thu, 1 Apr 2010
Ambitious plan to roof the Octagon
Dunedin’s Octagon is to be covered with a state-of-the-art thermoplastic roof, the same material being used at the Forsyth Barr Stadium, a secret report has revealed. A Dunedin City Council report, expected to be released at noon today, but leaked to the Otago Daily Times this week, revealed the ambitious plan which could cost the city up to $15 million.
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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Urban design