For urban designers, speculators and stadium nuts

We love pop-up maps!!!

Today, at Fast Company’s website, William Bostwick profiles Rob Carter’s Metropolis, a 9-minute history of Charlotte, North Carolina.

Metropolis, Bostwick says, is a trend trifecta: cartography, cut and folded paper, and urban history. The animation, made from a sequence of aerial pictures layered on top of each other, transforms Charlotte “from Native American trading post to cotton-age boom town to tower-spiked banking hub in just a few folds.”
Fast Company Link


5LoveMyself 15 February 2010
View full animation, Metropolis (2008), on Carter’s site. (9:30 mins)

More…

“Metropolis is a quirky and very abridged narrative history of the city of Charlotte, North Carolina. It uses stop motion video animation to physically manipulate aerial still images of the city (both real and fictional), creating a landscape in constant motion. Starting around 1755 on a Native American trading path, the viewer is presented with the building of the first house in Charlotte. From there we see the town develop through the historic dismissal of the English, to the prosperity made by the discovery of gold and the subsequent roots of the building of the multitude of churches that the city is famous for. Now the landscape turns white with cotton, and the modern city is ‘born’, with a more detailed re-creation of the economic boom and surprising architectural transformation that has occurred in the past twenty years.

Charlotte is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, primarily due to the continuing influx of the banking community, resulting in an unusually fast architectural and population expansion that shows no sign of faltering despite the current economic climate. However, this new downtown Metropolis is therefore subject to the whim of the market and the interest of the giant corporations that choose to do business there. Made entirely from images printed on paper, the animation literally represents this sped up urban planners dream, but suggests the frailty of that dream, however concrete it may feel on the ground today. Ultimately the video continues the city development into an imagined hubristic future, of more and more skyscrapers and sports arenas and into a bleak environmental future. It is an extreme representation of the already serious water shortages that face many expanding American cities today; but this is less a warning, as much as a statement of our paper thin significance no matter how many monuments of steel, glass and concrete we build.”
Vimeo Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

3 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Inspiration, Project management, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design

3 responses to “For urban designers, speculators and stadium nuts

  1. WOw, beautifully done. Michel Gondry as architecture student! Thanks for showing.

  2. kate

    Great link Elizabeth – and interesting work – watched the Reseed – similar theme – nature overtaking us, slowly as it does. The quandry for Charlotte and us, is what do we preserve, what do we develop and how – and that requires real holistic planning not to be dominated by landowners necessarily but by planning for a user friendly accessible (not necessarly by car) city. That also means not leaving areas undeveloped to fall over but to actively manage reuse projects, or preferably have planned sufficently well that it happens naturally. And to plan within our natural conditions first! Good thought provoking stuff.

  3. Richard

    Certainly interesting and visually arresting. I may be ‘slightly out’ but isn’t something similar – but without the animation – being undertaken in Dunedin (at Polytechnic)? Fliss frequently refers to it, but I cannot recall much active interest from other of our council colleagues not that I am suggesting they are not (passively) supportive.

    Not the stuff of headlines, of course, not even a few column cms.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s