“Tax codes, zoning, community boards, and financing are a straitjacket on new types of development”

### fastcompany.com Mon Feb 1, 2010
Introducing The Master Plan: A Chronicle of New Urbanism and Exurban Decay
By Greg Lindsay
“I was in California,” the consummate ad man Don Draper rhapsodised last season in Mad Men. “Everything’s new, and it’s clean. The people are full of hope. New York is in decay.” The suburban landscape that awed him circa 1963 was the fruit of a warm climate, middle-class manufacturing jobs, Federal Housing Administration mortgages, brand-new interstate highways, and tax code changes that made shopping malls a slam-dunk for developers. The immediate result was master-planned communities such as Lakewood, California, “the Levittown of the West,” which started from nothing in 1950 and had grown to 17,500 homes by the time Don Draper rolled through town. The rest is post-war geographic history.

The places that thrive today are those with the highest velocity of ideas, the highest density of talented and creative people, the highest rate of metabolism. -Richard Florida, creative class demographer

What a difference a half-century makes. America’s suburbs are now home to the largest and fastest growing poor population, according to a recent report by the Brookings Institution. The country’s largest metro areas saw their poor populations grow by 25% between 2000 and 2008, faster than either primary cities or rural areas. (The suburban fringes of Los Angeles were expected to take the biggest hit last year.) Part of this has do with math–the suburbs grew three times faster during that span. But faced with aging infrastructure, higher maintenance costs, and growing numbers of poor, this increase could become self-perpetuating, a la the inner cities in the 1960s and 1970s. “Clearly,” the Brookings Report concluded, “the balance of metropolitan poverty has passed a tipping point.”
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Design, Geography, Inspiration, People, Urban design

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