GOOD NEWS: University ban on alcohol promotion

Updated post

With what effects…see areas potentially affected by the ban and Lion Nathan’s concerns below. What will happen to stadium fundraising – this is the ruination of stadiumathon BBQs at University Plaza and Malcolm’s keenly anticipated student beer-and-pie lunches at the stadium. Did anyone think this through!!??

### ODT Online Wed, 14 Oct 2009
University bans alcohol promotion
By Allison Rudd
Alcohol advertising and sponsorship have been banned from University of Otago campuses and from university-organised events, wherever they are held. The university council yesterday endorsed a recommendation from vice-chancellor Prof Sir David Skegg, which takes effect immediately.
Read more

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### ODT Online Thu, 15 Oct 2009
Brewer seeks urgent talks on ban
By Allison Rudd
Lion Nathan wants urgent talks with the University of Otago on how its ban on alcohol advertising and sponsorship will affect two contracts already in place. [The company] was “surprised and disappointed” the university had not consulted it first.
Read more

The ban
Areas potentially affected include:

– Direct sponsorship.
– Events and conferences held on campus.
– Clothing with alcohol logos worn by students or staff.
– Posters for events off campus sponsored by alcohol companies.
– Sponsored staff functions.
– Sponsored conference programmes.
– Alcohol advertising in newspapers and magazines available on campus.
– Alcohol advertising on radio and television stations accessible on campus.
– Online alcohol advertising.
– Prizes supplied by alcohol companies for quiz nights, competitions.
– Vehicles signwritten with alcohol logos.
– Alcohol companies participating in trade exhibitions at conferences.
– Conference giveaways such as USB drives or bags with alcohol logos.

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### ODT Online Thu, 15 Oct 2009
Hazardous drinking widespread: academic
By Elspeth McLean
The level of harm being caused by the use of alcohol should concern people more than general trends about drinking, health researcher Dr Jennie Connor says. Commenting on the Ministry of Health national survey on alcohol use, released this week, Dr Connor, a senior lecturer at the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine at the University of Otago, said the report confirmed hazardous drinking and harm resulting from drinking was widespread.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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3 Comments

Filed under Business, Democracy, Economics, Events, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Perversion, Politics, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design

3 responses to “GOOD NEWS: University ban on alcohol promotion

  1. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Thu, 15 Oct 2009
    Pub calls ‘time’ on Cookathons
    By Debbie Porteous

    The Cookathon will not be held tomorrow, or ever again, as the owners of the Captain Cook Tavern acquiesce to the suggestions of the Liquor Licensing Authority.
    Read more

    ### ODT Online Wed, 14 Oct 2009
    Opinion: We drink to get drunk, to forget, to lose inhibitions
    By Simon Cunliffe
    We – or a worrisome proportion of us – are drinking ourselves to death, or doing our best to do so: there are more than 1000 alcohol deaths in New Zealand every year; 60 different medical conditions are caused by heavy drinking; up to 75% of adult presentations at hospital emergency departments on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights are alcohol-related; at least 600 children are born every year with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.
    Read more

  2. Phil

    Sorry for resssurecting an old thread, but thought this worthy of sharing. Maybe we’re not so bad after all.

    Several dozen university students occupied a brewery near Gothenburg in western Sweden on Tuesday in their long-standing effort to convince the brewery to build a pipeline to carry beer to the students’ union.

    “Hopefully we’ll get a pipeline relatively soon,” student union chair Alexander Westerling told the newspaper ahead of his negotiations with the brewery.

    The demonstration was part of a tradition started in 1959 when the university student union purchased one share in what was then known as Pripp & Lyckholm, part of the company which operated the brewery until it was purchased by Carlsberg in 2000.

    The stock purchase gave the students a seat at the company’s annual shareholders meeting, allowing them an opportunity to push the brewery to build a roughly 100 kilometre long pipeline to the university in order to facilitate the supply of beer to the Chalmers’ student union.

    But progress on building the pipeline has been slow over the last five decades. So far, only two metres of pipe have been laid. No further construction has taken place since 1968.

    Undeterred, the students returned to the brewery on Tuesday to renew their demands after a ten year break from pushing the issue.

    And not long after the students’ occupation of the brewery began, news emerged of a breakthrough in negotiations.

    “We’ve listened and accepted their demand. We’ll soon start construction on another one metre of pipeline,” Carlsberg spokesperson Göran Orre told the newspaper.

    Orre added that the brewery valued its relationship with Chalmers students, despite their demands.

    “There’s a long tradition between the university and Carlsberg which I think is worth preserving. They are a big customer for us and it’s important to have good relations,” he said.

    {Link: http://www.thelocal.se/24490/20100120/ Published: 20 Jan 14:36 CET -Eds}

  3. James

    That would be some inordinately stale beer! Any sort of sensible size pipe would have litres of beer in each metre!! But is fun symbolism!!

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