Former Logan Park Art Gallery talks

This week (ODT 5.10.09), reporter Chris Morris highlighted the Dunedin City Council proposal to remove the former art gallery building from the edge of the University Oval cricket ground in Dunedin. Councillors attending the community development committee meeting on Tuesday considered a report on the removal of the former gallery building in the closed section of the meeting. ODT Link

Note: Removal of the building is only one of the options on the council table.

Let’s not forget that current use of Logan Park itself includes active and passive recreation; this should not be lost sight of in any new development plans for ‘organised sport’ at the park.

Further, there’s no good reason to cut down the avenue of mature trees on Logan Park Drive.

Maintaining a watching brief… After all, this council of its own volition suddenly ‘closed’ a public road (again) this week – John Wilson Ocean Drive – upsetting citizens. The story broke on Channel 9 news on 6 October, with follow up the next day in Otago Daily Times.

Oh, and… A fence at Lawyers Head? Get real. What about coastal landscape values – I’ll say it, views to die for must be maintained and access not obstructed.

****

Entry on Heritage New Zealand’s List:

Exhibition Art Gallery (Former)
40 Logan Park Drive, DUNEDIN

List No: 2149

Registration Type: Historic Place – Category I
Region: Otago Region
Date Registered: 30/06/2006
City/District Council: Dunedin City Council

Other Names: Dunedin Art Gallery, Dunedin Public Art Gallery (Former), Logan Park Art Gallery, New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition Art Gallery (Former), NZ and South Seas Exhibition Art Gallery (Former), Old Art Gallery

Status Explanation: Review of registration confirmed BD2006/06/24.

Links: http://whc.unesco.org/archive/advisory_body_evaluation/1131.pdf – Royal Exhibition Building Australia No.1131, p.20

Brief History: The Exhibition Art Gallery was built as the art gallery for the 1925 New Zealand and South Seas International Exhibition in Dunedin. The World Fairs and Exhibitions were among the largest gatherings of people of all time, and they ranked amongst the most important events held in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Most exhibition buildings and sites were designed to be temporary, and there are, therefore, relatively few structures remaining. The Gallery appears to be the only surviving in situ exhibition building from any of the exhibitions held in New Zealand, and is also a significant survivor in the international history of exhibitions. This gives the Gallery outstanding historical significance.

The Gallery was designed by prominent Dunedin architect Edmund Anscombe (1874-1948). Anscombe was the originator of the idea to hold the exhibition in Dunedin, and was appointed official architect to the Exhibition committee in June 1924. Anscombe designed and supervised the lay out and construction of all seven of the exhibition pavilions. The building was symmetrically laid out with a large central exhibition hall from which two ambulatory circuits via the ten smaller galleries on either side of it were accessed. Each gallery was linked to its neighbour via decorative plaster archways.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

Filed under Architecture, Business, DCC, Design, Economics, Heritage, Museums, New Zealand, NZHPT, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

One response to “Former Logan Park Art Gallery talks

  1. James

    It’s interesting how temporary structures for Expos and World fairs live on. Not just uber-famous ones, like the Eiffel Tower, but much more obscure ones like the Aalborg tower as well.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aalborgt%C3%A5rnet

    And the pavilions themselves are curiosities, with their attempts to both express a national identity, but also to outdo everyone else’s.

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