"People: work very hard NOW"

MAINTAIN MOMENTUM

YOU SHOULD – everybody for or against the stadium – LOBBY HARD by going public at every opportunity there is to tell DCC, ORC, CST and (maybe) those in central government about the benefits or non benefits of the Otago stadium project.

Some of you are very vocal, you’re writing lots of letters, speaking to lots of people and working on other strategies in the greater city, continuously so. Thank you. Your energy is remarkable.

MORE WORK TO DO, because the stadium project is still fluid.

How does the stadium project affect you and the people you know or have responsibility for?
SPELL IT OUT

Your arguments should not be based on HOT AIR. Your arguments should be well stated: plainly stated and based on FACT or LACK OF FACT you have discovered about the project. Either way you will help to show what the exact status of the project is in your local community.

Do you feel you have been consulted properly on the stadium project?
SPELL IT OUT

If you haven’t stopped reading this, SAY WHY the stadium project will or won’t work practically, economically and or socially for the city.

****

Special note to those against the stadium:
A rates revolt is possibly too slow and too late to make a difference to what will unfold at DCC before and after Easter 2009.

REPEAT QUESTION: StS are you heading to judicial review. If we ask often enough it could happen, right?

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Concerts, CST, Design, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Inspiration, Media, Name, Other, Politics, Site, Stadiums, STS, Town planning

2 responses to “"People: work very hard NOW"

  1. David

    As someone who started off thinking that the Stadium was “a fantastic project” I’ve waited three years for something more than “it will be positive for Dunedin”.

    Three years later, and still nothing more. Questions asked, no answers. Suspicion grows. How about some basic facts and figures – who pays the depreciation?, what will the non-rugby events be? etc.

    More vague answers, or fantasy events for the stadium – swimming, eating lunch, basketball on false floors. People who want the stadium really start to get turned off, and even more suspicious.

    So what about a closer look at the figures. This massive benefit for Dunedin – how much is it? Well according to CST predictions the stadium will earn $200,000 per year – just 1/1000th of its cost, and when considering $5,000,000+ annual interest costs, it will be making huge losses.

    Add to this councillors who say it won’t cost much, because instead of charging rates, we’ll charge DCC companies which subsidise rates (i.e. no bottom line difference to ratepayers), and the words con and scam start to be used.

    By now we’ve gone from just over 50% of residents against paying for the project with rates (in a very dodgy DCC survey in which three out of four participants were men), to now having around 80% of residents against it.

    All those who say it is only old people who are against it, should ask themselves how many old people are in the student union, who are against it.

    And to those who say it’s multipurpose, I say rubbish. Look at the CST’s own figures. Less than 10% of income will be from stadium hire to events other than rugby – myth busted.

    And the city will pay more in ticket refunds (for memberships and corporate boxes) than they get in total venue hire for all rugby games. Again the word “scam” comes to mind (figures from CST’s own projections).

    I’m not against spending on Dunedin infrastructure – far from it. But it would be insane to build a new Moana pool costing $200m, just fractionally bigger than the old one, just down the road, then demolishing the old Moana Pool, and putting the city into debt for 20 years.

    The new stadium is not a golden goose. Yes – it will satisfy some egos, but it won’t do a lot more. The financial benefits to the city over the current stadium will amount to somewhere in the range of just 5-10% – but the costs are massive. Yes it will have benefits, but we already get almost all of them with Carisbrook.

    And the negligible improvement is founded on massive increases in spectators, when rugby the whole country over is suffering plummeting numbers (including in all the new stadiums like Wellington).

    If you really want spectator numbers to increase, you will have to go around Dunedin houses and bars and remove every large flat screen TV, you will have to make the Highlanders a local team again, you will have to make them win, a lot, and you will have to make students go and re-live their childhood and take away all access to sports and interests that are not rugby, and you will have to ban motorsports, multisport, cycling, surfing, motocross, soccer, and every other sport (and interest) that is eating into rugby’s previous dominance.

    In other words the golden days are over. Things have changed – it’s now 2009. And bankrupting the city for a stadium for a single sport that has plummeting support will not change that. Face it – the DCC survey, when rugby was at its absolute peak, showed that 75% of residents never ever went to Carisbrook. Since then numbers of spectators have plummeted.

    Lets move on. Concentrate on our strengths. A St Clair Pier, connected by tram to South Dunedin, Princes St, Casino, Octagon, George St shops, Museum, University, Gardens, Baldwin St. Something that costs a fraction of the price, would be used EVERY day, and bring tourists to Dunedin ALL year around. Dunedin is HERITAGE and WILDLIFE.

    And a full cycle/walkway the whole perimeter of the harbour from Taiaroa Head to Aramoana (the Otago Central Rail Trail earns millions for the region).

    And a cable car from the Baldwin St Tram terminus to the top to Mount Cargill, to the most spectacular view of any city in the country.

    That’s better than a $200m stadium that returns just 1/1000th of its costs, is 100% empty 355 days per year, 75% empty ten days per year, and full only one day in 1000.

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