Tag Archives: Economic development

Earthquake-prone Buildings Amendment Bill

The proposed amendment bill raises significant concerns about the maintenance of current building stock, the character and identity of towns and cities, and the economic and financial wellbeing of provincial councils and their communities. More than 7000 buildings south of Timaru would require upgrading, at a cost of $1.77 billion over a 15-year period.

Town Halls Merge 6

### ODT Online Mon, 24 Feb 2014
Councils aghast changes could cost billions
By Andrew Ashton
South Island councils are expected to offer a ”united front” in opposing new Government building regulations that could cost councils billions of dollars to implement.
Last year the Waitaki District Council joined the Dunedin and Invercargill city councils and the Central Otago, Clutha, Gore, Mackenzie, Southland, Timaru and Waimate district councils to present a joint submission on a discussion paper detailing proposed changes to the way earthquake-prone buildings are managed.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Town Halls and auxillary functions (clockwise from top left) Invercargill, Dunedin, Timaru and Oamaru – posterised by whatifdunedin

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DCC: Jaunt to USA, explain

Dunedin at night [commons.wikimedia.org] 1Dunedin, March 2010. Benchill (Wikimedia Commons).

### ODT Online Fri, 3 Jan 2014
Streetlight ideas from US trip
By Debbie Porteous
Seeing the bright lights of some major American cities has given the man responsible for a street lighting revolution set for Dunedin some solid ideas. Dunedin city council roading maintenance engineer Peter Standring went to the United States last year to look at different technologies and visit cities that have started updating their street lighting.
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Puzzled. The news story says Peter Standring went to USA.
But lower down, it says (our emphasis):

“Los Angeles was in many ways the world leader in the procurement, installation and development of LED technology, and the group was “very lucky” to have had one and a-half hours of Mr Ebrahimian’s time, Mr Standring said.”

What group? A DCC group? (or a USA group he tagged along with?) What have we paid for? A 2013 trip for one person to Los Angeles, Durham, Racine, Chicago, Phoenix and San Francisco —or a trip for a group of staff and their wives?
Clarification, please.

****

[via Upstart Incubator (@UpstartDunedin) who tweeted at 9:29 AM on Tue, Dec 31, 2013]

### mckinsey.com September 2013
How to make a city great
By 2030, 60 percent of the world’s population will live in cities. That could mean great things for economic growth — if the cities handle their expansion wisely. Here’s how.

What makes a great city? It is a pressing question because by 2030, 5 billion people — 60 percent of the world’s population — will live in cities, compared with 3.6 billion today, turbocharging the world’s economic growth. Leaders in developing nations must cope with urbanisation on an unprecedented scale, while those in developed ones wrestle with aging infrastructures and stretched budgets. All are fighting to secure or maintain the competitiveness of their cities and the livelihoods of the people who live in them. And all are aware of the environmental legacy they will leave if they fail to find more sustainable, resource-efficient ways of managing these cities.

Explore six diverse initiatives aimed at making cities great places to live and work.

To understand the core processes and benchmarks that can transform cities into superior places to live and work, McKinsey developed and analysed a comprehensive database of urban economic, social, and environmental performance indicators. The research included interviewing 30 mayors and other leaders in city governments on four continents and synthesizing the findings from more than 80 case studies that sought to understand what city leaders did to improve processes and services from urban planning to financial management and social housing.

The result is How to make a city great (PDF, 2.1MB), a new report arguing that leaders who make important strides in improving their cities do three things really well:

█ They achieve smart growth. Smart growth identifies and nurtures the very best opportunities for growth, plans ways to cope with its demands, integrates environmental thinking, and ensures that all citizens enjoy a city’s prosperity. Good city leaders also think about regional growth because as a metropolis expands, they will need the cooperation of surrounding municipalities and regional service providers. Integrating the environment into economic decision making is vital to smart growth: cities must invest in infrastructure that reduces emissions, waste production, and water use, as well as in building high-density communities.

█ They do more with less. Great cities secure all revenues due, explore investment partnerships, embrace technology, make organisational changes that eliminate overlapping roles, and manage expenses. Successful city leaders have also learned that, if designed and executed well, private–public partnerships can be an essential element of smart growth, delivering lower-cost, higher-quality infrastructure and services.

█ They win support for change. Change is not easy, and its momentum can even attract opposition. Successful city leaders build a high-performing team of civil servants, create a working environment where all employees are accountable for their actions, and take every opportunity to forge a stakeholder consensus with the local population and business community. They take steps to recruit and retain top talent, emphasise collaboration, and train civil servants in the use of technology.

Mayors are only too aware that their tenure will be limited. But if longer-term plans are articulated — and gain popular support because of short-term successes — leaders can start a virtuous cycle that sustains and encourages a great urban environment.
Link to source

McKinsey&Company The material on this page draws on the research and experience of McKinsey consultants and other sources. To learn more about their expertise, visit the Infrastructure Practice, Public Sector Practice, Sustainability & Resource Productivity Practice.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: commons.wikimedia.org – Central city view of Dunedin, New Zealand, at night from Signal Hill lookout. The dark horizontal band above the centre of the photo is the Town Belt. Some landmarks including First Church of Otago and the Dunedin Railway Station are visible near the centre. Photo by Benchill, 9 March 2010.

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NHNZ development mode (new business, markets)

“It’s like the next version of NHNZ. It’s like NHNZ version 3.1 in a lot of ways, version one being when we were part of TVNZ, version two being when [former managing director] Michael Stedman took over and gave us a new lease of life, and this is another step.” –Kyle Murdoch, NHNZ

### ODT Online Wed, 27 Nov 2013
Children’s TV for NHNZ
By Vaughan Elder
Dunedin’s NHNZ is preparing to take on the likes of Disney with the launch of its own international children’s television channel. NHNZ managing director Kyle Murdoch said, in preparation for the launch of the channel next February, 54 staff were hard at work in Dunedin producing content for it. About 40 were new staff who had joined the office since the middle of this year.
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● Michael Stedman, former managing director, retired at the beginning of this year.

NHNZ website (detail)Natural History New Zealand website [screenshot detail]

Wikipedia: NHNZ

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Doh, low growth for Dunedin

North Dunedin [flickriver.com] re-imaged 3North Dunedin [flickriver.com] re-imaged by Whatifdunedin

### ODT Online Sun, 20 Oct 2013
Census data tests planning assumptions
By Chris Morris
The Dunedin City Council will review some of the assumptions underpinning its planning efforts, after census data revealed slower-than-expected growth in the city. Council city development manager Dr Anna Johnson yesterday told the Otago Daily Times the city’s growth rate was lower than council planning had anticipated. The city’s resident population had increased from 118,683 in 2006 to 120,246 this year, which equated to annual growth of just 0.19%, she said. That was below 2006 expectations, which had anticipated annual growth of 0.4%, she said. ”The growth is slower than was expected or planned for, and it is lower than the estimates that we have been working with.” There was nothing in the data as yet to suggest the council should change urban development policies included in its spatial plan, which anticipated demand for an extra 7600 residential units in the city by 2031, Dr Johnson said.
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Related Posts and Comments:
18.8.13 South Dunedin and other low lying areas
12.6.13 Dunedin housing: building up or Brown-like sprawl…
2.4.13 Dunedin: Developers stoop to resource consents instead of…
18.9.12 DCC ‘vision’ (spatial plan chess)
14.4.12 How perverse is the New Zealand housing market?
8.2.12 Dunedin City district plan review
8.12.11 interest.co heats NZ housing debate – listen up
7.12.11 Spatial Plan consultation #Dunedin
1.12.11 Spatial plan “rainbows” – Dunedin
28.10.11 Dunedin’s DRAFT Spatial Plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Tauranga: Office leases to cover potential losses from hotel

OH WOW, another $100M baby!!!!!!

Tauranga - carpark on Durham St [bayofplentytimes.co.nz] 1This council carpark on Durham St could be home to a long-awaited $100 million hotel and commercial building development.

### ODT Online Wed, 24 Jul 2013
$100m hotel plan for city
By John Cousins – Bay of Plenty Times
A massive $100 million building is proposed for council-owned land in Tauranga’s downtown after plans for an international hotel escalated into a combined hotel and commercial office development.
Mayor Stuart Crosby announced that negotiations between the council and Tainui Holdings, the Waikato iwi’s investment arm, had seen a substantial high-end office development added to the original plans for a $40 million hotel. The council’s ambitions for the block of land on Durham St are now only a week away from a firm direction being given on whether the project went ahead.
Tainui Holdings and its hotel operator partner, Accor group, had until July 17 to carry out due diligence and had kept the council abreast of progress.
Mr Crosby said the much larger project had been driven by the opportunity that the income from office leases would cover potential losses from the hotel: “Hotels are notorious for not making profits in their early years.” APNZ
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Tauranga downtown’s emerging skyline

Recent Additions
$30m ANZ Building on the corner of Cameron Rd & Elizabeth St
$14m Sharpe Tudhope Building on the corner of Devonport Rd & 1st Ave
$21m police station, Monmouth St

Planned Additions
$1m-plus 3-storey retail & office building on The Strand’s Grumpy Mole site
$10m office building on the corner of Willow St & Harington St
$30m TrustPower head office
$67m tertiary and research campus
$100m international hotel and office development

PS. Dunedin is SO not Tauranga. The Bay is poised to boom as the fruit bowl of Asia. Meanwhile on the Taieri, Dunedin City Council lets a councillor and friends build speculative housing and a plant nursery turn into a gravelled ‘destination hub’ (without a legal water connection?) on high class soils, with impunity.

Recent Post and Comments:
25.6.13 Hotel/Apartment Tower decision to be appealed

For information on the proposed $100M ‘Dunedin Hotel’, enter *hotel* in the search box at right.

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Dunedin: New £300m fund

Folks, we’ve reached Nirvana – through partnership.
Mayor Dave’s been working our (Hidden Dunedin) sister-city relationships with great success. The council’s consolidated debt is CANCELLED, pending further notices!!
Disaster AVERTED.

Received.
Monday, 22 July 2013 12:38 p.m.

### telegraph.co.uk 6:19PM BST 21 Jul 2013
Dunedin bucks investment trend with new £300m fund
By James Quinn
Dunedin, the London-based private equity firm, has closed its third fund at £300m, it can be disclosed. The total is approximately £50m higher than the £250m Dunedin had initially been aiming to raise, and bucks the trend in an otherwise lacklustre private equity and venture capital fundraising market. Approximately 60% of the funds have come from outside the UK, as overseas investors want to benefit from Dunedin’s focus in the small and mid-sized company market.
The proportion of international backers is three times that from Dunedin’s previous fund, when foreign money made up just 20% of the total invested.
The new fund, the closing of which is expected to be announced as early as today, is understood to have been particularly popular among north American and Scandinavian investors. There also has been increased interest from backers in Germany and France, it is believed.
The Dunedin Buyout Fund III, as it is formally known, is understood to have received investments from sovereign wealth funds, state and private pension funds, insurance companies, foundations and so-called “fund of fund” specialists. In addition, some £60m of the new fund is understood to have been committed by the Dunedin Enterprise Investment Trust, which is listed on the London Stock Exchange. The fundraising was led by Shaun Middleton, Dunedin’s managing partner.
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HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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RMA and Key’s right-wing slashers

BACKWARD STEP: Our environment is at risk if the Resource Management act is watered down.Anton Oliver [stuff.co.nz]

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 21/07/2013
Gutting the RMA – it’s time to be concerned
By Anton Oliver
Source: Sunday Star-Times
OPINION | The Resource Management Act (RMA) has sadly become a much maligned and misunderstood piece of legislation: a kind of universal public punching bag – if mentioned in conversation, it is almost obligatory to put the slipper in. To most Kiwis it represents bureaucracy and inefficiency – pen-pushing do-gooders and paper shufflers who engage us in excessively long and costly processes that get in the way of us Kiwis doing stuff.
In fact the RMA – passed in 1991 – was a means of rectifying mistakes and providing at least some environmental and social integrity to development and planning process. It was recognised by legal minds to be a world-leading piece of legislation. It protected our environment and our economy based on the premise of sustainable resource management. What’s more, it was politically robust in that it received the blessing of both major parties.
It also gave New Zealanders a chance to be heard and it facilitated local decisions made by local people. While the country’s environmental indicators such as water quality and biodiversity loss have still gone backwards – the RMA has stemmed what would otherwise have been fatal haemorrhaging.
Similarly, the RMA has protected a set of fundamental Kiwi values: the notion of fairness and equity in regard to everyone having a right to their say; industry and other activities being required to take responsibility for avoiding, remedying or mitigating adverse environmental impacts; and developments being required to have regard to effects on such things as recreation, scenic values, private property rights, and the public’s access to rivers, lakes and beaches.
That’s all about to change.
The Government plans to alter the Act to give greater weight to economic development over environmental considerations, granting to itself the right to veto any issue. You don’t have to be legal-minded to see the impact of subtle word changes. While the consideration for the “benefits” of a project remains, gone are any references to the “costs”, making a cost-benefit analysis redundant because environmental “cost” is out of the equation.
Gone, too, are the words: “maintenance and enhancement of amenity values”. That’s basically any recreational activity – walking, running, swimming, fishing, kayaking. Who likes doing that stuff anyway? Thankfully the “importance and value of historic heritage” stays. But its cobber, “protection from inappropriate subdivision and development” gets the boot – making the first clause meaningless. And my personal favourite, “maintenance and enhancement of the quality of the environment” has been politely asked to leave. Clearly such an unruly clause has no place in a legal act that’s trying to protect the environment.

The Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, Jan Wright, has a different interpretation. She thinks the changes “muddy the overwhelming focus of the RMA, to protect the environment, and risk turning it into an Economic Development Act”. Similarly alarmed, the architect of the RMA, Sir Geoffrey Palmer, concludes: “The [proposed changes] will significantly and seriously weaken the ability of the RMA to protect the natural environment and its recreational enjoyment by all New Zealanders.”

The changes also grant considerable new powers to central government, giving it the ability to take individual consent decisions away from local councils and place them in a new national body. The changes go further still, by allowing government the right to insert provisions in local council plans without any consultation.
Read more

● Former All Black Anton Oliver is an ambassador for Water Conservation Order NZ.

Related Posts and Comments:
21.4.13 *fashionable* Heritage Dunedin and the RMA holocaust
17.3.13 RMA Bill: Public meeting 21 March
6.7.12 Recommended changes to RMA explode environmental protection

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: stuff.co.nz – Anton Oliver

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Reykjavik, Iceland: The strongest mirror [speculative apartments]

I missed it – the press release of Thursday 21 March, issued by Otago Polytechnic.

Icelandic Activist To Speak At Dunedin School Of Art
Iceland democracy activist and artist Hordur Torfason will be speaking at Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin School of Art on Wednesday the 27th of March, as part of a series of nationwide talks on modern democracy. cont.

By chance, at morning coffee a friend mentioned the speaking event and offered a ride there. Well. Not one speaker, but two – our good fortune doubled.

All Dunedin residents should have downed tools, pots and pans to attend.

The two men from Iceland, Hordur Torfason and life partner Massimo Santanicchia, each delivered a session at the School, with Santanicchia up first.

They shared intriguing, calm, sensible statements about their lives and work, about the quality and countenance of human social interaction, within a gripping exposé of the capitalist drain and the peaceful revolution that occurred in their financially devastated homeland — with thoughts to urbanism, greed, discrimination, corruption, property speculation, sick governance, economic collapse, human rights, the lobby power of silence, noise and internet, and the Icelandic people’s hard-won solidarity for change.

A compelling two-hour glimpse at a nation losing and finding itself.

Iceland’s capital city, Reykjavik, is the strongest of mirrors held to Dunedin’s glaring errors of recent and pending ‘big’ construction, economic blunders, and forces of business and political corruption – in turn, Dunedin reflects our nation’s wider political and economic struggles.

[Dunedin, we're not crippled here yet... but New Zealand? Blind rhetoric.]

ODT 21-12-12 screenshotProposed hotel and apartment building, Dunedin (ODT Online, 21 Dec 2012)

Derelict Reykjavik Highrises (Donncha O Caoimh 9-3-12 inphotos.org)Derelict Reykjavik highrises

While on our photowalk today we passed these buildings on the sea front. I thought they were just another apartment building until I noticed that the balconies were fenced in by planks of wood held together loosely!
Donncha O Caoimh (9 March 2012)

Originally from Perugia, Italy, Massimo Santannichia graduated from the School of Architecture in Venice in 2000 and holds an MA from the Architectural Association, School of Architecture in London, and an MSc in Urban Studies from the London School of Economics. He has been working as an architect and urban designer in Italy, the UK and Iceland. Over the last decade he has come to know Reykjavik intimately. Essentially an outsider in the tightly knit Icelandic society he has survived the downturn by moving from the firm Arkitektur to a plethora of internationally connected activity – delivering courses at the Iceland Academy of Arts since 2004 and coordinating projects and workshops with organisations such as the International Peace and Cooperation Centre and the Architectural Association.

Santanicchia’s research interests include relations between the ecological, physical, social and economical aspects of cities. He has lectured extensively on the subject of sustainable cities and small scale urbanism in Zurich, Athens, Oslo, London, Venice, Riga and Reykjavik.

Massimo Santanicchia (AA Summer School promo for July 2013)Santanicchia, second from right (AA Summer School promo for July 2013)

The Production of Space: The lesson from Reykjavik

According to Santanicchia, small cities (less than 500,000 inhabitants) host fifty-two per cent of the world’s urban population, yet they are profoundly neglected in the urban studies field. His presentation at the School of Art focused on the small city of Reykjavik (118,326 inhabitants), investigating how the planning system is trying to build a new urban strategy away from the world city model which was adopted until the banking collapse of 2008.

Reykjavik, Iceland - houses (trekearth.com) 2Reykjavik, Iceland – vernacular housing (trekearth.com)

Commodifying the view…
In particular, Santanicchia noted Reykjavik’s receipt of its first ‘tall buildings’, a crop of extraordinarily bleak apartment developments set against the vernacular lowrise, 3-4 storeyed townscape, blocking existing residential views of the coastline – through to (now dead) speculative drive-to malls and commercial buildings ['build it and they will come'] further problematised by the profound lack of public transport and infrastructural support to the (then) ‘new phase’ of development.

Throughout the commentary, the physical and moral contradictions were purposefully illustrated by well-selected slides, quotations, and use of statistics. Santanicchia’s creative and socio-political approach to what ails, and demonstrations of how to foster community investment in sustainable environment, is the busy-work of a contemporary intellectual with a warm humanity, grounded in the discipline of practical economics working for the public good.

He and students have won grants to set ‘in place’ temporal urban interventions that sample ways forward for the local community, utilising vacant and degraded public places; demonstrating creative re-design / re-forming of the opportunities lost to the blanket of capitalist-grey asphalt – making places that create “trust” between institutions and among people.

[This work is very similar to that of Gapfiller in post-quake Christchurch.]

Massimo Santanicchia, Reykjavik (project work)Reykjavik’s dislocated waterfront (‘reconnection’ project work)

Copy of Santanicchia’s presentation slides and readings will be made available through Professor Leonie Schmidt (Head of School).

A few points he made along the way, from my notes:

● When “priority is given to economic development”… the city becomes all about ‘building envelope’, ‘the city as a series of volumes’ (bulk and location) | “Management of the economy is not a city, is not urban planning.”

● In 2008, Iceland’s economy shrank 90%. The economy devalued by more than 100% in one week. 1000 people emigrated which kept unemployment low.

● “Big-fix” solutions don’t work in a small city.

● The DANGER of “one idea”… “it is NOT a plurality”.

● “The WORST is what was built.” Flats and parking lots. No public transport. No sharing. 7000 apartments at Reykjavik are redundant. 2200 properties have been acquired by the banks.

● “The WORST neighbourhoods were created in the richest years.”

● The government didn’t protect the weakest. “The architecture failed because it placed itself at the service of political and economic interests with very little regard for social interests.”

● (Jane Jacobs, 1984): “The economic model doesn’t provide niches for people’s differing skills, interests and imaginations, it is not efficient.”

● (Aldo Rossi): “Building a city is a collective effort.” [empower the people]

● Post-crash, Iceland’s birthrate has increased and children are happier.

● “Trust is about participation.” Better institutions, social justice, equity and public/private relationships.

Zurich: They used 4 hot air balloons to indicate the height and bulk of a proposed tower development, prior to public submissions being received on the proposal.

[In evidence, at Dunedin, Betterways Advisory said it couldn't afford to provide a height indicator at 41 Wharf St - and where do you get balloons from anyway, it asked.... Mr Rodgers (Betterways), we know, took his mother-in-law ballooning in Germany recently. Perhaps he could have made a stopover in the Mackenzie Country on his way home.]

### architecturenow.co.nz 25 Mar 2013
Massimo Santanicchia visits New Zealand
By Stephen Olsen
Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter has won high praise from Reykjavik-based architect Massimo Santanicchia for the “observable scaffolding” it is providing for an area in transition.
Santannichia knows a thing or two about making waterfront spaces more accessible from sparking a design revival at the harbour’s edge of the world’s northernmost capital last year, within the context of an award-winning programme known as the Meanwhile projects.
Santanicchia has also been drawing audiences to hear his views on the ways in which Iceland’s largest city is embracing a more human scale of urbanism in the wake of the financial crash.
Read more

Hordur Torfason followed with a punchy impassioned delivery, spoken with a run of crowd scenes and peaceful protest images repeating behind him.

In describing post-crash Reykjavik as a scene of ferment and healing, Torfason took us through specific mechanisms for the peaceful revolution that has worldwide and local application – hear that, Dunedin.

Shortly, Torfason will head to workshops in Cypress. The following interview (2011) covers the gist of his lecture.

An outstanding multi-talented individual, he told his story from the age of 21 (1966), of how he grew the personal confidence and expertise (“proving talent”) to lead the people of a city and a nation to overturn the Icelandic Government and jail the bankers. He said Parliament has almost lost all respect amongst all Icelanders. Nevertheless, there is a bill in passage to make Iceland a Safe Haven for journalists, whistleblowers, international media – protected by law.

● He maintains the role of the artist is to criticise, that criticism is a form of love: “We have to use reason, cultural roots, feelings and the precious gifts of life – our creativity”, to ensure human rights aren’t undermined by economic growth and politics.

“It’s about learning every week, every day, new sides of corruption,” he said. “Inequality is a tool for extortion, a way to maintain The System.”

● Inequality won’t be removed by conventional systems: “If you want to move a graveyard, don’t expect the inhabitants to help you.”

● “The internet has to be protected to dislodge the monster.”

● “One big party owns one big newspaper for Iceland.” According to that paper there was no crash.

The key word is AWARENESS. The silence of government was upsetting to the people; it meant the people used silence as a mirror to the government and politicians, to protest their rights. The cohesiveness and cleverness of the protest, the silent revolution, achieved 100% success. “They the media won’t tell you [the rest of the world] about it.”

● “Stick together and use the internet.” Make Plan A, B, C, D, E. Protest by peaceful revolution v Arrogance.

● Just 25 people from around the world are responsible for the crash, and one of them was the leader of Iceland’s national bank.

Hordur Torfason - blogs.publico.es (juan carlos monedero June 2011)Hordur Torfason (Juan Carlos Monedero, June 2011)

### grapevine.is August 4, 2011
You Cannot Put Rules On Love
An Interview With Hordur Torfason by Paul Fontaine

“I tell people, ‘I’m not demonstrating. I’m fighting for a better life.’ I think aloud, ask questions, seek answers. I knew there was corruption in this country. But I never thought in my wildest dreams that the banks would crash. We have been told lie after lie after lie, and people just accept them. They say ‘þetta reddast’ ['it'll all work out'], until it affects them personally, and then they come screaming.”

The 2008 economic collapse of Iceland would send Hordur’s life path in a whole new direction—one that would take him beyond the bounds of even his own country.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Hearing for proposed hotel – competencies, conflicts of interest?

Comments received.

Phil
Submitted on 2012/12/19 at 12:49 am
The consent process in New Zealand is fatally flawed by having unqualified elected officials on the hearings panels. In Europe consent hearings are presided over by qualified independent persons. The applicant has little chance of covering up a project’s shortcoming with glitter and sparkles, as is the case with this current application. The risk for bias or for conflicts of interest is also dramatically reduced to the point where it is no longer a factor in decisions. We all know, from the Mayor’s repeated media broadcasts of glee, that approval of this hotel is a foregone conclusion.

Phil
Submitted on 2012/12/19 at 12:52 am
At the very least they should be stopping Colin Weatherall from attending the City Planning consents meetings every week, to “advise” the trained planners on the best approach they should be taking on certain pending applications. No conflict of interest there, right ? Only on this Council could we have the least qualified person telling the most qualified people how to do their jobs and what conclusion to reach.

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6.12.12 Dunedin Hotel – revised design
2.12.12 Roy Rogers and Trigger photographed recently at Dunedin
26.11.12 Proposed hotel, 41 Wharf Street – indicative landscape effects
20.11.12 City planner’s report recommends against consent for hotel
10.11.12 Dunedin Hotel, 41 Wharf Street (LUC 2012-212)
4.10.12 DUNEDIN: We’re short(!) but here is some UK nous…
8.9.12 Waterfront Hotel #Dunedin (Applicant names?)
7.9.12 Waterfront hotel: DCC to notify resource consent application
16.5.12 Dunedin Hotel

Yesterday, chairman of the hearing committee, commissioner Weatherall reiterated that the three elected commissioners have NO conflicts of interest.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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“But there’s more to Dunedin than just bloody cruise ships’’

### DScene 17-10-12
Big brother is watching (page 1)
Jeweller Brent Weatherall says Dunedin City Council is being dictatorial and ineffectual when it comes to some aspects of economic development. See p3. #bookmark

Register to read DScene online at
http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

CBD not just for tourists
‘Dictatorial’ council angers city businessman (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
City retailer Brent Weatherall says Dunedin City Council (DCC) is dictatorial rather than consultative on some aspects of its economic development strategy. The George St jeweller said Otago Chamber of Commerce retail committee members were ‘‘hot under the collar’’ after a recent meeting with Cr Kate Wilson over proposed city council changes, such as banning footpath signs. “I think [the DCC] is being quite dictatorial in what they’re trying to push through council in regards to the economic development strategy.” Weatherall said during forming of the strategy the Chamber retail committee was approached in consultation and made a submission on changes to the council’s commercial use of footpaths policy, aired at a hearings subcommittee in May. The council’s response? A talk from subcommittee member Cr Kate Wilson on the virtues of introducing the ban because DCC saw them as a hazard. It left the Chamber retail committee “all up in arms”, Weatherall said. “Everyone that was there said ‘for God’s sake – we opposed this.’ I feel that our suggestions at times fall on very deaf ears in Dunedin. It’s a real shame.”
{continues} #bookmark

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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This is all painfully familiar…

blog.svconline.com

The trials of the Phoenix Coyotes, the least popular hockey team in the NHL, offer a lesson in public debt and defeat.

### theatlantic.com Sep 7 2012, 2:37 PM ET
Business
If You Build It, They Might Not Come: The Risky Economics of Sports Stadiums
By Pat Garofalo and Travis Waldron
In June, the city council of Glendale, Arizona, decided to spend $324 million on the Phoenix Coyotes, an ice hockey team that plays in Glendale’s Jobing.com Arena. The team has been owned by the league itself since its former owner, Jerry Moyes, declared bankruptcy in 2009. For each of the past two seasons, Glendale has paid $25 million to the league to manage the Coyotes, even as the city faced millions of dollars in budget deficits. Now, Greg Jamison, who is also part of the organization that owns the NHL’s San Jose Sharks, is making a bid for the team, and would therefore be the beneficiary of the subsidies.

“Take whatever number the sports promoter says and move the decimal one place to the left. Divide it by ten. That’s a pretty good estimate of the actual economic impact.”

To put the deal in perspective, Glendale’s budget gap for 2012 is about $35 million. As the city voted to give a future Coyotes owner hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars, it laid off 49 public workers, and even considered putting its city hall and police station up as collateral to obtain a loan, according to the Arizona Republic. (The latter plan was ultimately scrapped.) Overall, Glendale is not only on the hook for $15 million per year over two decades to a potential Coyotes owner, but also a $12 million annual debt payment for construction of its arena. In return, according to the Republic, the city receives a measly “$2.2 million in annual rent payments, ticket surcharges, sales taxes and other fees.” Even if the Coyotes were to dominate the league like no other in recent memory and return to the Stanley Cup Finals year after year, the city would still lose $9 million annually.

“It’s kind of a perverse argument that taxpayers should subsidize this because businesses depend on this deal that isn’t viable.”

This is an altogether too common problem in professional sports. Across the country, franchises are able to extract taxpayer funding to build and maintain private facilities, promising huge returns for the public in the form of economic development.
Read more

[Link supplied]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DRAFT Dunedin Economic Development Strategy

“We are competing with every other local body in New Zealand trying to attract talent, growth and investment.”

### ODT Online Tue, 19 Jun 2012
Call for’ more mongrel’ in draft strategy
By Chris Morris
Submitters have made their voices heard on Dunedin’s draft economic development strategy. Nearly 100 individuals, groups and organisations have expressed their views. Council staff yesterday confirmed 90 submissions had been received since the draft strategy was unveiled last month by Dunedin City Council chief executive Paul Orders and other members of the steering group. Critics worried the strategy’s statements were “easy to make”, lacked detail and remained “fundamentally … a talk-fest”. Others called for more radical initiatives.
Read more

[Over] Simplistically…
Looking at the partners to the strategy, and who the people are within those partnerships, is it any wonder Dunedin has a lack of business diversity and sharpness in international and domestic markets – or hardly appears at all.
FAIL.

Why is the city council entertaining this draft? Council is filled with bureaucrats who know nothing about business development, plus it has Athol – every smart business knows not to have an Athol. Or old boy councillors and company directors – dead meat for the rort.

The university produces so much traction and sludge it should be ignored, but let’s grab any bright sparks attracted to it and haul them to safety! Whereas, Otago Polytechnic has the capacity over time to produce the raw material of a smart workforce.

Dunedin should be THE LEADER in Otago Southland for business development – it must think regionally/globally – today, DCC gets as far as the Octagon and a couple of old warehouses. Embarrassing.

Very few local businesses think EXPORT.

### ODT Online Tue, 19 Jun 2012
Mortgages to staff worth $4.5 million
By Chris Morris
Staff across the Dunedin City Council group have been granted millions of dollars worth of home loans sourced by the council’s financial services arm, the Dunedin City Treasury. Figures released to the Otago Daily Times showed DCT had granted 43 loans to staff across the council and its council-controlled organisations (CCOs). The loans stretched back 14 years and were together estimated to be worth between $4.5 million and $5 million.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Farry to lead campaign? – say NO

### D Scene 1-2-12
‘Go to’ idea inspires Farry (page 3)
Bid to find leader for Consider Dunedin campaign
By Wilma McCorkindale
Stadium project leader Malcolm Farry has been stirred by the suggestion he should lead a campaign to get Christchurch people to move to Dunedin. Farry’s name has been put forward by one of the business people behind the Consider Dunedin campaign. Eighteen Dunedin businesses advertised theirs as the “go to” city in a Christchurch paper [Christchurch Mail, owned by Fairfax] last year and are now looking for an identity to take their crusade further.
{continues} #bookmark

Register to read D Scene online at
http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Related Post:
31.12.11 Dishonourable mention

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Rebuilding Dunedin (no typo intended)

Lee Vandervis asks whether Christchurch should actually be rebuilt.

### ODT Online Fri, 6 Jan 2012
Opinion
Post-quakes rebuild should be in Dunedin
By Lee Vandervis
“When will it end?” contains the assumption that the earthquakes in Christchurch will end. We all hope the earthquakes have ended, of course, but recent geotechnical and historical evidence suggests otherwise. Earthquakes in other urban areas around the world have usually been one-off disasters. Christchurch is an unusually ongoing seismic disaster that has had unprecedented psychological effects on people living there. The seismicity map shows continuous events for more than a year, from Darfield through Christchurch to Lyttelton.

Dunedin sensitivity about being predatory on Christchurch seems to me like an excuse to sit on our hands and do nothing. Predation is the basis of business competition and is necessary for vitality in business and for viability in world markets. If we can do it better here than in Christchurch we should, and government – local and national – should be right behind us.

Read more

• Lee Vandervis is a Dunedin city councillor.



Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Spatial plan “rainbows” – Dunedin

Dunedin City Council critic Calvin Oaten says the city should turn all its attention to saving itself from bankruptcy rather than spending time, money and resources chasing “spatial plan” rainbows.

### ODT Online Thu, 1 Dec 2011
Opinion
As they say, there are lies, damned lies and statistics
By Calvin Oaten
“A ‘special’ Dunedin is seen in new plan.” So said the headlines covering the presentation of the council’s draft “spatial plan” to about 100 people at a public forum at Forsyth Barr Stadium recently. So what is this plan? “Dunedin Towards 2050 – a Spatial Plan for Dunedin”, sets the strategic direction for Dunedin’s growth and development for the next 30-plus years.
Read more

DCC Draft Spatial Plan Information
Deadline for public submissions: 13/1/2012

Calvin Oaten reminds us about the long forgotten “CHOICES For The Future. Towards 2021″ plan devised by DCC, released in 2001, a 20-year outlook:

“Arguably, the most egregious aspect which has driven the plan off course is the fact that Mr Harland, mayor Peter Chin and the council went on a spending spree of unprecedented proportions, commencing in 2004, taking Dunedin’s net debt from $35 million in 2002 to $457.790 million in 2013.”

Mr Harland instigated all work on the draft spatial plan for Dunedin.

Play-shaping, plain and simple.
(refer to comment by ODT Online editor)

Related Posts:
30.11.11 amalgamation, Anyone?
28.10.11 Dunedin’s DRAFT Spatial Plan
21.9.11 John Montgomery: The Economy, Culture and Design of Cities
7.6.11 Public Workshop: Dunedin Central City
3.3.11 restorm: Will Wiles attempts to deconstruct…

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Retrofitting commercial buildings

The process is starting in Dunedin’s CBD…

### idealog.co.nz 2 November 2011 at 10:12 am
Sustain
Why the retrofit market is the key to green growth
By Deirdre Robert
There are any number of ways to stimulate the green job market, but the World Economic Forum reckons investing in energy efficient upgrades for existing commercial buildings is a sure fire approach. It’s released a report on the subject entitled, A Profitable and Resource Efficient Future: Catalysing Retrofit Finance and Investing in Commercial Real Estate.

On a visit to New Zealand in March this year, “environment capitalist” Anthony Malkin, of New York City and Empire State Building fame, offered some advice to John Key. Malkin maintained that dollars spent on building retrofits have a payback that, when seen in terms of local employment and benefits, arguably outweigh investment in new energy creation projects. A $200 million wind farm, for example, requires technology to be imported and the taxpayer dollar goes offshore.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Idealog: R&D and innovation

“Kids are missing out in New Zealand because there’s no connect between the education system and a vision for where we’re going to grow our economy.” -Sir Paul Callaghan

### idealog.co.nz 18 October 2011 at 3:36 pm
Let’s end the flip-flopping on R&D
By Sarah Robson
What do Rakon, Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Tait Electronics, Gallagher Group and Weta Digital have in common? Aside from being successful and enjoying a high profile in business, they’re also the benefactors of the government’s first round of technology development grants, announced late last year. (A second round was awarded in August, with recipients including accounting startup darling Xero.) National pulled no punches in scrapping the Labour government’s all-encompassing R&D tax credit in favour of a targeted, grant-based approach. It’s not a given – businesses have to apply for a slice of the funding pie along with every other man and his dog, and there are no guarantees. But it’s time for government to stop flip-flopping on the issue. Cuts to government spending aren’t going to lift New Zealand out of the economic doldrums. Investment in R&D just might.

Prominent scientist and New Zealander of the Year Sir Paul Callaghan believes New Zealand needs to diversify its economy if its goal is to expand GDP per capita, and start selling ‘brain content’. That means you’re selling products where the manufacturing costs aren’t the main costs of the products – it’s the R&D content.

Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
24.9.11 Idealog: Paul Callaghan’s business plan for New Zealand
21.9.11 John Montgomery: The Economy, Culture and Design of Cities
23.6.11 Kathryn Ryan interviews agribusiness pioneer George Harrison
22.5.11 Audacious idea: New Zealand X-Prize Environmental and Energy

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Workshop for heritage building owners – 23 November

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Oct 2011
Heritage building workshop planned
By David Loughrey
Communication between Dunedin building owners and the city council is strengthening, as the council works to help owners find ways to re-use the city’s stock of heritage buildings.

The council’s second annual one-day workshop for heritage building owners will be held on November 23. The theme this year is “After Christchurch: What to know about owning an older building”, with the free workshop targeting owners of non-residential buildings.

The first workshop, an initiative of the council’s heritage buildings economic re-use steering group, attracted more than 80 people last November, with numbers bolstered by concerns following the first major Christchurch earthquake. Council heritage policy planner Glen Hazelton said strong interest was expected again.
Read more

7.10.11 DCC Media Release

To register or for more information contact Glen Hazelton 477 4000 or ghazelto@dcc.govt.nz

Workshop Highlights
• Speakers include Jason Ingham, from the University of Auckland and co-author of a report for the Canterbury Earthquakes Royal Commission entitled ‘The Performance of Unreinforced Masonry Buildings (URM) in the 2010/2011 Canterbury Earthquake Swarm’, Alan Race (Crombie Lockwood) on insurance matters, and Lou Robinson (Hadley Robinson) on earthquake strengthening.

• The New Zealand Historic Places Trust and Dunedin City Council will provide presentations, with the DCC outlining its new Earthquake-prone Buildings Policy and the range of incentives available to heritage building owners to assist earthquake strengthening.

• Steve Macknight of Steve Macknight Strengthening and Design and Lawrie Forbes of Zeal Steel, will conduct site visits to earthquake strengthening projects.

Workshop for Heritage Building Owners Information Flyer (PDF, 219.6 KB)

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Training, jobs, city regeneration

Register to read D Scene online at
http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

### D Scene 5-10-11
Celebrating restoration
By Owen Graham
The Larnach Tomb restoration project, like others, needed the specialist skills of a stonemason and stained glass artist to ensure a high standard of preservation. The quality of work is there for all to see and, in a city with as much heritage as Dunedin, is a reminder that there ought to be many more opportunities for skilled trades and crafts people, and for these skills to be nurtured and passed on. There is work waiting to be done in heritage restoration projects. {continues} #bookmark

• Owen Graham is the New Zealand Historic Places Trust area manager Otago/Southland

Related Post: 17.9.11 Larnach Tomb restoration

Historic Cemeteries Conservation Trust of New Zealand Photos* + More

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Wellington Towards 2040

Forming the “digital powerhouse”…

Wellington’s biggest assets are its compact form, its harbour setting and the quality of life. It also boasts a highly skilled population with the highest incomes in the country.

### idealog.co.nz 29 Sept 2011 @ 11:13 am
Wellington’s new 30-year vision
By Design Daily Team
Last night Wellington City Council unanimously agreed on a long term vision for the city, one that will have sustainability, digital saviness and innovation at its core. Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown said the strategy, called Wellington Towards 2040: Smart Capital, would underpin and guide all Council strategies across economic, environmental, social, technology, transport and other key issues.

The four goals identified by the council are:

People-centred city – the aim is to be healthy, vibrant, affordable, resilient, have a strong sense of identity, and strong and healthy communities.

Connected city – this is connectedness in every sense: physical, virtual or social. Strategies like the Digital Strategy fall under this.

Eco-city – this is a response to all the environmental challenges the city faces over the coming decades, and the Council is confident [it] can lead the country by example.

Dynamic central city – this section largely deals with urban design aspects of the central city – making sure it’s still a great place to be where new ideas happen – and maintaining its role as the creative and innovative force to drive the regional economy.

Read more

WCC Report (15 September 2011)

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John Montgomery: The Economy, Culture and Design of Cities

Dunedin City Council hosted a public lecture by Dr John Montgomery at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery last Friday (16 September).

Dr Montgomery provided a presentation [PDF, 5.94 MB] on the economy, culture and design of cities, building on his work in the UK and Australia. His views are particularly relevant for the development of Dunedin’s Central City Plan and Economic Development strategies.

John Montgomery is an urban planner, economist, author and managing director of Urban Cultures Ltd.

Urban Cultures consults in urban economics, city planning, urban design, arts-led urban revitalisation and managing the night-time city.

More on John Montgomery at Idealog.

Your City Our Future (YCOF) – Update

Dunedin City Council undertook a city-wide consultation in June 2011 to identify priorities for future expenditure. The results from the consultation survey are available here: YCOF survey report July 2011

The information and feedback received from the consultation, along with the feedback from the YCOF leadership teams has been used in the development of the Council’s draft spatial plan, “Dunedin Towards 2050″, draft Central City Plan, and draft Economic Development Strategy.

Formal consultation on these documents is planned for October/November 2011.

Find additional information on the development of the Council’s Central City Plan here: www.dunedin.govt.nz/centralcityplan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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The Auckland Plan

It’s the season for spatial plans!

### idealog.co.nz 20 Sep 2011 at 1:40pm
Auckland’s grand plan to build the ‘world’s most liveable city’
By Esther Goh
It’s a tall order, making Auckland’s the ‘world’s most liveable city’ by 2040, but we’ll never know if we don’t try. Mayor Len Brown today launched the draft Auckland Plan, accompanied by plans for the region’s economic development, the city centre and the waterfront, which outline initiatives for urban design and business growth to secure its future as a “globally competitive city”.

The proposals shape options for how JAFAs may live and work, and the transport services they will use. The report sets out five priorities:
• dramatically accelerating the prospects of children and young people
• committing to environmental action and green growth
• outstanding public transport within one network
• radically improving urban living and the built environment
• substantially lifting living standards for all Aucklanders

Click here to have your say on the plan.

Read more

****

ODT Online Tue, 20 Sep 2011
Grand vision for Auckland revealed
Auckland mayor Len Brown has today unveiled his vision to make it the world’s most liveable city by 2040. The 30-year plan looks to create a world-class city centre and waterfront with a city rail link, and to focus on improving education, health and housing. It also sets sets out how Auckland will absorb an additional one million people and build 400,000 houses to accommodate them in the next 30 years. APNZ
Read more

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Central City Plan consultant reports back #Dunedin

Kobus Mentz and the Urbanism Plus team working on the Central City Plan are due to report back to the Council and public on 11 August, with their draft findings.

For those who made the original workshop in June, you’ll know that Kobus and team take a collaborative approach. They have received a huge number of inputs and ideas from a wide range of sources – this will be a great opportunity to view their progress.

We look forward to seeing the draft plan!

The public session for reporting back is on August 11, 6-8pm at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery auditorium.

All welcome.

Please RSVP (for indication of numbers) to Glen Hazelton, Policy Planner (Heritage), Dunedin City Council – phone 03 477 4000, fax 03 474 3451
glen.hazelton@dcc.govt.nz

****

Related post:
7.6.11 Public Workshop: Dunedin Central City

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DCC Finance, Strategy and Development Committee – meeting postponed

Agenda – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 89.2 KB, new window)
Today’s (Monday 25 July 2011) Finance, Strategy and Development Committee meeting has been postponded due to the snow. The meeting will now be held on Thursday 28 July at 1.00 pm in the Auditorium of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery.

Report – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 1.5 MB, new window)
Stadium Precinct Executive Summary 16
Report – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 59.9 KB, new window)
Project Gateway
Report – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 459.9 KB, new window)
Change to Structure to Achieve Regional Economic Development
Report – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 184.0 KB, new window)
Development Contributions Policy – Schedule of Charges 2011/12
Report – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 49.7 KB, new window)
Infrastructure Insurance Renewal 2011/12
Report – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 206.9 KB, new window)
Strategic Risk Fund For Insurance
Report – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 662.6 KB, new window)
Financial Result – 12 Months to 30 June 2011
Report – FSD – 25/07/2011 (PDF, 1.9 MB, new window)
Council’s Debt Raising Arrangements

FSD Committee Link

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Wednesday Farmers Market for South Dunedin

UPDATED

Dunedin City Council, as at 10 January 2010, granted Resource Consent to the Otago Farmers Market Trust to establish a Farmers Market at 41 Macandrew Road in South Dunedin.

The consent comes with conditions. The hearing committee believes “the proposal will not give rise to more than minor adverse environmental effects . . . and considers that the proposal is a “true exception” as the site is one of the very few places suitable for running a market in South Dunedin . . . in particular it would foster the communities’ social and economic well being while encouraging the sale of locally grown goods in market within walking distance of the densely populated South Dunedin suburb”.

15 working days are allowed for the applicant and/or a submitter to appeal the decision to the Environment Court.

****

### ODT Online Wed, 12 Jan 2011
S. Dunedin farmers market gets consent
By Stu Oldham
South Dunedin looks set to get its seasonal farmers market – all that remains is to decide when. The Dunedin City Council has given the Otago Farmers Market Trust consent to operate a market in the car park of the Congregational Christian Church of Samoa on Macandrew Rd.
Read more

Related Post and Comments:
30.11.10 South Dunedin Retail Centre

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Disclaimer: Elizabeth Kerr, an instigator and former foundation trustee of the Otago Farmers Market Trust, submitted in support of the application.

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