Tag Archives: Conservation

Vogel St. Street Party | Saturday 18 Oct 3pm – 11pm

All Welcome – what change, collaboration and vision can do!

Vogel St_Street Party Sat 18 Oct 3pm-11pm[click to enlarge]

████ Download Map Guide for activity locations and booking information at http://vogelandbond.org/assets/VogelStreetPartyGuide.pdf

Building Tours - Vogel St Street Party

Related Post and Comments:
22.6.14 Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13) [photos]
5.8.14 DCC staff-led CBD projects that impact ratepayers | ….council debt
28.9.14 “DCC entitlement” about to ramrod change at CBD #manipulation

Photos by Glen Hazelton (Tumblr)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Vandervis family residence #HistoricHeritage

Lee Vandervis [leevandervis.wordpress.com] BWOn Dunedin TV tonight, newspaper editor Murray Kirkness mentioned the upcoming feature on Lee Vandervis’s beautiful historic home in Roslyn, written by Kim Dungey.

Read the weekend Mix at Otago Daily Times.

Vandervis residence BW [google street view] 1.1

Updated post 6.10.14 at 3.20 p.m.

### ODT Online Mon, 6 Oct 2014
Home & Garden
Labour of love
By Kim Dungey
Home ownership is not usually about daring physical feats but nobody’s told outspoken city councillor Lee Vandervis. Lee Vandervis was 15m above ground, spreadeagled over the peak of his roof. Moments earlier, he’d climbed out of the house on to the slate tiles and crawled along the ridging to repair and rewire a floodlight. The operation he admits was a “bit dodgy” was also typical of the boots-and-all approach Vandervis has taken to the restoration of his Roslyn home, built in the late 1890s for Otago Medical School dean John Halliday Scott.
Read more + Photos by Stephen Jaquiery

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Vandervis residence via Google Street View (tweaked by whatifdunedin)

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Bell Tea Building has a future!

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Bell Tea Company – New Zealand’s No. 1 Tea Company http://www.belltea.co.nz/

IMG_6775 (2a)The factory of New Zealand’s oldest tea company, founded in 1898 by Norman Harper Bell in Dunedin. Photos: Elizabeth Kerr 2010

Dunedin’s Bell Tea building, on the corner of Hope and Carroll Sts, has been sold. Bayleys commercial, industrial and retail agent Robin Hyndman said there had been “good interest” in the building, more than 20 site visits and four tender offers lodged. (ODT)

### ODT Online Thu, 4 Sep 2014
Developer buys Bell Tea building
By Simon Hartley
Dunedin’s distinctive 90-year-old Bell Tea building has been sold to Dunedin developer Peter Gullen, who says it was a spur-of-the-moment purchase. Mr Gullen, known for building flats and townhouses around the city, was reluctant to go into plans for the building, but said he first “wanted to get it earthquake proof and save the building”.
Read more

ODT 3.7.14 Bell Tea building offered for sale
ODT 11.3.14 Bell Tea to close Dunedin factoryIMG_6789 (3)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13)

DCC Map Warehouse PrecinctStreet improvements under way for the redeveloped warehouses and other commercial buildings in the heritage precinct, including new light stands, plantings and protrusions — photographed last Saturday (14.6.14). Highly coloured seats and rubbish bins have yet to be installed. Read more about the project here.
Click map to enlarge.

Bike stands and a light stand outside Queens Gardens House, cnr Rattray Street:
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Light stand outside Phoenix House (45 Queens Gardens):
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Looking south from Phoenix House along the west side of Vogel Street:
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Looking north from Phoenix House to Queens Gardens:
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Former NMA buildings (note badly scaled and positioned sign):
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Landscaping and protrusions for safe crossing:
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Other views (including the former Donald Reid Store at 77 Vogel Street):
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Warehouse Precinct Revitalisation Plan (PDF, 3.6 MB)
This Plan seeks to support the revitalisation to ensure the important historic Warehouse Precinct area becomes a vibrant and successful part of the central city, once again.

Dunedin Warehouse Precinct by Alexander Trapeznik, 2014, 188 pages with map and illustrations (PDF, 9.91MB)

Dunedin’s warehouse district is a newly rediscovered treasure. Spanning the few blocks stretching from the harbour-side to Princes Street, from Queens Gardens to the Oval, for many years this area slipped out of the public eye. The grid-pattern street layout contains a dense mixture of commercial and industrial buildings, typically between two and four storeys high. Many have a decorative façade to the street and plain brick or masonry walls facing their neighbours. Some became derelict, others home to a variety of uses. A few have been demolished to create car parks. Recently, many of the buildings have become the subject of renewed enthusiasm, being strengthened, refurbished, repainted and valued once again. –Trapeznik

Post and images by Elizabeth Kerr

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Significant Tree: 28A Heriot Row

Proposed for Removal: Significant Tree T578

Submissions Close: 30/05/2014

Notification of Application for a Resource Consent – Under Section 93(2) of the Resource Management Act 1991.

The Dunedin City Council has received the following application for Resource Consent:

Application description
Resource consent is sought to remove a significant tree at 28A Heriot Row, Dunedin. The tree is a Maple Tree (genus Acer) and is recorded as T578 in Schedule 25.3 of the Dunedin City District Plan. The tree is located in the front yard of the subject site.

The site is legally described as Part Section 30 Block XXIV Town of Dunedin, held in Computer Freehold Register OT96/150, and has an approximate area of 463m2. The site is located within the Royal Terrace/Pitt Street/Heriot Row Heritage Precinct (TH08).

Applicant: John and Evellen Jackson of Drysdale Ltd – 142 Stafford Drive, Ruby Bay, Mapua 7005

Read more:
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/notified-resource-consents/current-consultation/significant-tree-28a-heriot-row

Quick Find: Application LUC-2014-157 (PDF, 882.3 KB)

28A Heriot Row (subject site) 1Light green circle indicates trunk position of Maple tree at 28A
28A Heriot Row (concept building sketch) 1Sketch concept for site development supplied by applicant

26, 28, 28A Heriot Row (showing Maple tree) DCC WebmapDCC Webmap showing proximity of Ritchie House, 26 Heriot Row

The applicant only seeks removal of the listed tree; a second resource consent application would be required to develop the subject site, since it is located in the heritage precinct.

SUBDIVISION HELL AT HERIOT ROW
The subject site is part of the former garden allotment, with original brick garage, of the Heritage New Zealand listed Category 1 Historic Place, the Ritchie House at 26 Heriot Row. This large, outstanding Arts and Crafts house and the brick garage were designed by renowned Dunedin architect Basil Hooper.

The applicant bought the property knowing the Significant Tree (Maple) was listed for protection in the district plan. The tree does not preclude development of the site; and note there is a covenant in place.

Independent consulting advice from an arborist, a landscape architect, and a design architect, to the Hearing Committee should be mandatory for consideration of the application. An opinion should also be sought from Heritage New Zealand (heritage precinct).

Heritage New Zealand registration information for 26 Heriot Row – go to Assessment criteria at http://www.heritage.org.nz/the-register/details/7492

Dunedin Heritage Fund
(administered by Heritage New Zealand and the Dunedin City Council)
2004. The owners of Ritchie House received a $20,000 loan to assist with a range of restoration works.

26 Heriot Row (watercolour sketch) 1Seen from 28 Heriot Row – 28A garden with Maple tree, and 26 Ritchie House

Related Post and Comments:
22.2.13 DCC: Significant Trees

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Heritage New Zealand

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) – and now trading as Heritage New Zealand – is New Zealand’s leading national historic heritage agency and guardian of Aotearoa New Zealand’s national heritage. The environment in which NZHPT operates continues to be characterised by a growing interest in heritage, recognition of its social, cultural, environmental and economic benefits, and awareness of its importance to national identity.

The NZHPT was established by an Act of Parliament in 1954. The NZHPT is established as an autonomous Crown Entity under the Crown Entities Act 2004, and is supported by the Government and funded via Vote Arts, Culture and Heritage through the Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Its work, powers and functions are prescribed by the Historic Places Act 1993.

Heritage New Zealand – a change of name
In 2010, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage led a review of the Historic Places Act 1993 (HPA) and as a result of that work the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Bill was drafted and is currently before the House. It is currently awaiting the committee stage, and its third reading. The Bill includes provisions that will result in some changes to how the NZHPT operates, and to archaeological provisions of the HPA. It also proposes a change in name to Heritage New Zealand. The Bill will complete NZHPT’s transition from NGO to Crown Entity. To facilitate the transition, the decision was made to proceed with the name change ahead of the legislation. From 14 April 2014, the organisation has been known as Heritage New Zealand.

HeritageNewZealand 13 Apr 2014

Welcome to Heritage New Zealand
The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) has changed its name to Heritage New Zealand. Chief Executive Bruce Chapman explains the reasons behind the change.

Heritage New Zealand will continue to work in partnership with others, including iwi and hapū Māori, local and central government agencies, heritage NGOs, property owners, and volunteers. We will continue to provide advice to both central and local government, and property owners on the conservation of New Zealand’s most significant heritage sites. We will continue to maintain the national Register of historic places, manage 48 nationally significant heritage properties, regulate the modification of archaeological sites, and manage the national heritage preservation incentive fund.

While Heritage New Zealand receives 80% of its funding from the Crown, like many other Crown agencies it continues to be dependent for the remainder of funding from supporters, donations, grants, bequests, and through revenue generated at the heritage properties it cares for around the country.

Three key things remain the same under the new name:
● commitment to the long-term conservation of New Zealand’s most significant heritage places, including own role as custodian of 48 historic properties
● connection through members (membership benefits are unchanged) and supporters to the wider community
● continued status as a donee organisation, dependent on the goodwill and ongoing financial and volunteer support of the wider community for many of the outcomes the organisation achieves for heritage.

www.heritage.org.nz

Heritage New Zealand Logo

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Hotel We LIKE: Distinction Dunedin Hotel at former CPO

Reopening the former Chief Post Office building “marks a significant milestone for the restoration project, with more tenants, a three-level car park building and, eventually, the 120-apartment four-star-plus Distinction Dunedin Hotel, all to follow”. (ODT)

CPO Dunedin Chief Post Office 1930s [rootsweb.ancestry.com] re-imagedDunedin Chief Post Office (1930s)

### ODT Online Tue, 25 Mar 2014
Office workers light up CPO
By Chris Morris
The return today of a commercial tenant to Dunedin’s former chief post office building for the first time in more than 15 years marks a significant milestone in the restoration project. About 145 staff from Silver Fern Farms are expected to start work in their new headquarters – occupying the first two floors of the partially-restored building – this morning. It was the first time the building had been home to a permanent tenant since closing its doors in 1997, building owner Geoff Thomson, of Distinction Hotels, said.
Read more

Dogged controversy.
Submissions in opposition to the proposed waterfront tower hotel at 41 Wharf Street (LUC 2012-212) make frequent mention of a preference to see the old Chief Post Office restored and in use as a city hotel in The Exchange.
Dull criticism from the anti-heritage brigade has often been cast at the old building’s owner for lack of speed in making the redevelopment happen.
Geoff Thomson, a canny and diligent man, has proceeded with the retrofit of this very large government architect-designed building at the pace he can afford in the up-down market he faces. Geoff Thomson deserves significant praise for his passion and perseverance in seeing the project through as well as attending to quality tenanting and leases.

History and significance.
New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) Category II registration report.

CPO reroof (May 2011). Gerard O'Brien [odt.co.nz]Photo: Gerard O’Brien – Reroof, May 2011

Related Posts and Comments:
22.6.13 Dunedin’s former Chief Post Office
5.3.11 Former Chief Post Office, Dunedin – magazine feature…
14.8.2010 No surprises with former CPO redevelopment
12.5.10 DScene – Geoff Thomson buys back former CPO
11.5.10 DCC Media Release – Chief Post Office
16.3.10 Planning the future of Dunedin heritage buildings [recent comments]
10.11.09 Dunedin public library services
24.10.09 Rodney Wilson: Dunedin as national heritage city
20.7.09 DCC + former CPO + others(??) = a public library (yeah right)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: rootsweb.ancestry.com – Dunedin Chief Post Office (1930s) re-imaged by whatifdunedin; odt.co.nz – Gerard O’Brien: CPO Reroof, May 2011 [screenshot]

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