Why should Port Otago dredge?

### ODT Online Sat, 27 Mar 2010
Fishermen oppose Port Otago’s sand, silt proposal
By Allison Rudd
Otago fishermen have formed a working party to write their formal response to Port Otago’s plans to dump more than seven million cubic metres of sand and silt off Taiaroa Head. Port Otago will soon apply for resource consent to widen the Otago Harbour shipping channel and dump 7.2 million cubic metres of dredge material 6.5km out to sea.

The Port Chalmers Fishermen’s Co-operative fears the sand and silt may create a “dead zone” along the coast, threatening fishing stocks and their income.

Read more

Related posts:
21.2.10 So where’s the media explosion?
26.2.10 Latest on Dunedin’s offshore oil and gas prospects
26.2.10 Port Otago: “Next generation” project
11.3.10 ORC: Ports merger only approved if it benefits Otago
18.3.10 Dunedin harbourside for oil base?

****

The interesting thing is, aside from port merger politics, a number of New Zealand’s major ports are dredging their channels in anticipation of larger container vessels.

Did the ports’ boards stop to ask the shipping line(s) ‘What size of boats are you planning to send us?’ So we, the port companies, can reliably assess if we need to fund expensive consenting processes and dredging?

Sometimes, the ports’ suit brigades aren’t up to managing their way out of a paper bag? That’s not the right question, or is it. After all, this is a matter of regional-national logistics and planning for sustainable business development in New Zealand.

Bottom line: port activity must be coordinated and quality controlled for the service and development of the national export economy as much as the global shipping trade.

The ports falling into into ad hoc, reactionary localised practice; attempting to do things on the cheap; not attending to maritime safety; not upskilling and training the workforce; failing to coordinate the spread of risk across our major deepwater facilities and access points; not inviting new business partnerships and supplier relationships; and so on – is not about promoting and building an efficient, flexible and sustainable freighting base for New Zealand producers.

Why encourage container traffic through the port of Lyttelton if their cranes are unsuitably old and clunky (showing the lack of major investment in that port company’s infrastructure)?

Why send (larger?) container ships to Port Otago if there’s no harbour master to oversee maritime safety? Why would we think to promote Dunedin as an oil base without a harbour master? (Hello, Otago Regional Council, owner of Port Otago Ltd, are you going to manage your responsibilities to the marine environment anytime soon? …An international vessel grounds in Otago Harbour, we haven’t systems and accountabilities in place to manage spillage and contamination – the boat’s full of high value Fonterra milk powder immediately due to China processing plants – we’ve f***ed the supply chain. Who doesn’t get their money, who is liable?)

****

Knowing and managing risks and liabilities going forward through close modelling, system analysis and quality control of New Zealand supply chains, industry processing, freight handling and haulage, transportation planning, trade diplomacy, incentive systems, international gateway ports and airports – amongst other factors – is ESSENTIAL to growing the export economy.

Not too many people know how the ports operate. We assume all the systems and risks are being professionally managed by the port companies, according to statutory requirements.

The truth is – leaving statutory responsibilities aside for a moment (by the way, it’s not all tip-top with these) – each port has been crawling along, instituting its own limited management and operating systems. A power of work at every level is urgently needed to bring industry consistency to the safe management and competitiveness of our New Zealand ports.

Why allow a bunch of ‘sailors’ (many of them accountants with no wider training or expertise), dressed as port executives, to run New Zealand port infrastructure like they know what they’re doing. They don’t.

The ports’ middle management tiers are gripped by the heavy overwhelming reality of historical cumulative logistical weakness in the New Zealand port industry.

All up, ports’ management is not well organised – or sufficiently well skilled and educated – for the practical, hardnosed ‘change management’ required in the national port sector.

The port boards and bosses are under par as strategists. Let the blood-letting begin.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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25 Comments

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25 responses to “Why should Port Otago dredge?

  1. Elizabeth

    ### ODT Online Tue, 15 Jun 2010
    Careys Bay Association back to fight noise issues
    By Rebecca Fox
    The implications of Port Otago’s next generation plans are bringing the Careys Bay Association out of recess. The 37-year-old association, which has tackled noise issues from port activities in the past, will hold a meeting at the Careys Bay Hotel tonight to inform residents of Port Otago’s plans, including extending the wharf at the Boiler Point reclamation, association secretary-treasurer Joseph Cecchi says.
    Read more

  2. Sam

    http://www.facebook.com/portotagodredging

    http://twitter.com/PortOtagoDredge

    for info on dredging

    {Sorry Sam, your two messages went to moderation automatically via WordPress. This happens if there is more than one url per message. We failed to notice this earlier on the Dashboard. Must be Friday. – Eds}

    • Elizabeth

      ### ODT Online Sat, 3 Jul 2010
      Opposition to harbour dredging
      By David Loughrey
      Opposition to Port Otago’s plan to dredge the Otago Harbour channel and dump 7.2 million cu m of sand and silt 6.5km beyond Taiaroa Head is emerging, with a public meeting on Monday to increase public awareness of the issue. Friends of the Otago Harbour organiser Dr Richard Reeve, who also opposed wind-farm development in Otago, said there was concern the dredging would “radically change” the underwater environment.

      “The proposal is the largest and most intensive single dredging programme that the harbour has seen in its history, and the wider environmental effects are as yet not wholly understood.”

      Read more

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Sat, 26 Mar 2011
        Economy v environment issue again
        By Simon Hartley and Rebecca Fox
        Port Otago’s long-term “next generation” channel-deepening proposal may be its largest project during the past 145 years, but it has attracted widespread criticism, from recreationalists and environmentalists through to scientists.
        Read more

        ****

        ### ODT Online Sat, 26 Mar 2011
        Harbour plans dredge up opposition
        By Simon Hartley
        On the eve of Port Otago beginning its three-week resource consent application to widen and deepen 13km of the shipping channel, Senior Reporters Simon Hartley and Rebecca Fox recap the issues, submissions and process about to get under way.
        Of the 195 individuals, groups and businesses who have made submissions on the proposal, 75%, or 148, are against the proposal. Well over 100 submitters – a mix of those for and against – wanting to be heard and prompting the need for a three-week hearing; starting on April 4.
        Read more

        ****

        ### ODT Online Sat, 26 Mar 2011
        Regional council supportive, but with specific conditions
        By Rebecca Fox
        Port Otago’s Project Next Generation resource consents should be granted, subject to conditions, the Otago Regional Council’s staff report says. An independent panel will on April 4 start hearing Port Otago’s applications to dredge Otago Harbour, deepening and widening the existing lower harbour channel, swinging area and Port Chalmers berths to provide access for larger container vessels in the future.
        Read more

        ****

        Just not sure POL has the strategic thinking and internal values systems in place to properly anticipate the flexibility and market requirements of its future customer base and those of the shipping line(s). The use of larger vessels is not a foregone conclusion.

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Tue, 5 Apr 2011
        Port puts forward case for dredging
        By Rebecca Fox
        Effects of Port Otago’s Next Generation project will be avoided or mitigated by proposed conditions and an environmental monitoring plan, Port Otago’s counsel told a hearing panel yesterday.
        Read more

        ****

        ### ODT Online Tue, 5 Apr 2011
        Dredging volumes great
        By Rebecca Fox
        Due to the sheer volume of material to be dredged as part of the proposed widening and deepening of Otago Harbour’s channel, an alternative disposal site is needed, Port Otago general manager infrastructure Lincoln Coe says.
        Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Wed, 6 Apr 2011
          Cost to region in not deepening port
          By Rebecca Fox
          If Otago Harbour is not deepened to take bigger vessels, by 2028 the region will have lost more than 890 jobs and $107 million a year, including $50 million a year in household income, economic consultant Geoffrey Butcher estimates.
          Read more

          ****

          ###ODT Online Wed, 6 Apr 2011
          New wharf could mean more noise
          By Rebecca Fox
          While the noise effects from dredging Otago Harbour are likely to be minor, operational noise from extending the multipurpose wharf might increase gradually in Careys Bay, acoustic consultant Keith Ballagh says.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          The tale of slippery snakes…

          ### ODT Online Thu, 7 Apr 2011
          Harbour Dredging sand disposal disquiet allayed
          By Rebecca Fox
          Modelling has shown virtually no sediment from the disposal of sand from the proposed dredging of the Otago Harbour channel will be deposited in Blueskin Bay or along the coast either side of Karitane Point, coastal scientist and environmental engineer Dr Robert Bell says.
          Read more

          ****

          More speculation. Fonterra doesn’t have to use Port Otago for export, there are the ports of Timaru and Bluff, and Lyttelton! Large vessels serving its supply chain are just one option.

          ### ODT Online Thu, 7 Apr 2011
          Fonterra plea for port channel consent
          By Rebecca Fox
          Granting consent for Port Otago to deepen and widen its channel will be in the best interests of New Zealand’s export sector, Fonterra trade and operations general manager strategy Nigel Jones says. Fonterra represents 25% of New Zealand’s exports and ships about 130,000 20-foot equivalent units (TEU) out of the country – with more than 20% of those leaving from the Port of Otago.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Wed, 13 Apr 2011
          Runanga stress site’s importance
          By Rebecca Fox
          It is completely “unthinkable” customary food gathering and kai moana (food from the sea) assets of Otago’s coast be put in jeopardy, diminished or destroyed as a result of Port Otago’s proposed dredging and disposal project, Kati Huirapa Runanga ki Puketeraki chairman Matapura Ellison says.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Thu, 14 Apr 2011
          Call for more research into Port Otago project
          By Ellie Constantine
          It may have gained support from a tourism operator and a neutral response from the Dunedin City Council, but Port Otago’s Project Next Generation has others calling for more research.
          Read more

          ****

          ### ODT Online Thu, 14 Apr 2011
          Man-made islands mooted for harbour
          By John Lewis
          The upper Otago Harbour could become home to a series of man-made islands – one as large as 30ha – if a Dunedin group gets its way. Harbour Restoration Group member Peter Hayden said the organisation had been “galvanised into action” after sitting through Otago Regional Council hearings on Port Otago’s application to dredge material from the lower Otago Harbour.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Fri, 15 Apr 2011
          Call for $15m-$20m port dredge-soil bond
          By Rebecca Fox
          Port Otago should be made to pay a “huge bond” of $15 million to $20 million to runanga to monitor the impact of the disposal of soil 10km away from the East Otago taiapure (coastal patch) to suit “the people, not the applicant”, Kati Huriapa Runanga ki Puketeraki upoko David Ellison says.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          “Project next generation represents another chapter in the continuation of further environmental decline which will only contribute to impoverishment of Otago fisheries” – Roger Belton.

          ### ODT Online Sat, 16 Apr 2011
          Doc drops opposition to dredging harbour
          By Rebecca Fox
          In a turnaround, the Director-general of Conservation has dropped his opposition to Port Otago’s Project Next Generation, saying his concerns have been resolved.

          Doc technical support officer Bruce McKinlay said Doc was concerned a lot of the assessment was made on modelling without on-site data to underpin it but it had “moulded its concerns into a package” to get real data that could be analysed on a regular basis.

          Read more

          ****

          There’s no getting around the issue that POL would be happy to fill in Careys Bay. It’s something of a standing joke at HQ.

          ### ODT Online Sat, 16 Apr 2011
          Careys Bay residents say noise will be worse
          By Rebecca Fox
          Their lack of success in getting Port Otago to deal with noise complaints has led Careys Bay residents to believe the Next Generation Project will only make things worse, especially the proposed multipurpose wharf extension.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          More news stories on Port Otago’s application to dredge:

          19.4.11 Fishermen oppose dumping of spoil
          19.4.11 Salt marsh concerns
          20.4.11 Surf break threat feared
          20.4.11 Grant Port Otago consents: ORC

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Mon, 20 Jun 2011
          Harbour dredging approved
          By Rebecca Fox
          Despite extensive opposition to Port Otago’s Next Generation Project, the company has been granted resource consent to dredge Otago Harbour and dispose of the soil at sea. The independent hearing panel, led by John Lumsden, has just released its decision approving the proposal.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Thu, 23 Jun 2011
          Port Otago to review time-frame for dredging
          By Simon Hartley
          The time-frame of Port Otago’s expanded dredging operations will be eased back with the imminent vessel downsizing by its largest customer, shipping giant Maersk, which begins from August 1.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Mon, 27 Jun 2011
          Dredging appeal possible
          By Rebecca Fox
          Community and fishing groups who oppose Port Otago’s Next Generation Project will be meeting this week to decide whether to appeal the granting of consents for the project.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          Recently, learning of a strategy (of appeal) meeting to be held by the Careys Bay Association at Careys Bay Hotel, the executives of Port Otago Ltd laughed, saying they’d turn up and crack open a bottle of champagne in the midst… the arrogance of POL’s head bummers is astounding.

          ****

          ### ODT Online Sat, 9 Jul 2011
          Groups appeal consent to dump spoil
          By Rebecca Fox
          At least five groups will appeal to the Environment Court an independent panel’s decision to grant Port Otago consent to dredge Otago Harbour and deposit spoil at sea. The Port Chalmers Fishermen’s Co-operative, CRA 7 (Otago) management committee, Southern Clams, East Otago Taiapure and the Careys Bay Association have decided to appeal the decision made by the Otago Regional Council’s panel last month. The appeal period ends on Monday.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          POL plays the hardball…

          ### ODT Online Tue, 19 Jul 2011
          Port tells appellants to provide evidence
          By Rebecca Fox
          Port Otago is calling for the six organisations that have appealed its next generation project to the Environment Court to “front up” with robust scientific evidence.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          ### ODT Online Wed, 22 Feb 2012
          Dredging plan headed for Environment Court
          By Rebecca Fox
          Port Otago’s plan to dredge Otago Harbour and dump the spoil off-shore will have its day in court after mediation with fishing industry groups failed. An independent panel approved resource consents for the company’s Next Generation Project last year but the decision was appealed to the Environment Court by the Careys Bay Association and seven fishing and related industry groups. Mediation since had resolved the concerns of the Careys Bay Association and Southern Clams Ltd, regarding inner harbour activities. However, the appeals relating to the open sea disposal site by the East Otago Taiapure management committee, paua, rock lobster and commercial fishing groups remained unresolved.
          Read more

        • Elizabeth

          The Inland Port was never off POL’s agenda so much as waiting for Fonterra to get itself sorted. They are close, after all.

          ### ODT Online Thu, 26 Jul 2012
          Port hub to extend container capacity
          By Simon Hartley
          Port Otago is expanding its footprint around Dunedin to increase its warehousing and container-handling capacity – with developments and plans under way for Sawyers Bay, Dunedin and a major hub in Mosgiel. With Port Chalmers wharf space at a premium and Port Otago unable to reclaim further land under the Resource Management Act, chief executive Geoff Plunket said development sites had to be identified and integrated to underpin future expansion. In a presentation of its draft statement of corporate intent to the Otago Regional Council yesterday, Port Otago outlined to its owner its three-year plan, which will be reviewed annually. Mr Plunket said later that rail access for two sites, in Mosgiel and Dunedin, had partially driven the decisions for redevelopment.
          Read more

          ****

          ### ODT Online Thu, 26 Jul 2012
          Wharf to trial 24-hour loading
          By Allison Rudd
          Ravensdown is revisiting plans to unload ships around the clock at its Ravensbourne fertiliser manufacturing plant. About 20 ships visit annually, delivering rock phosphate and other raw materials which are unloaded by Ravensdown staff and contractors. The company’s Otago Regional Council shipping resource consents require unloading to take place between 7am and 11pm, but environment manager Tamsyn Dawson said Ravensdown was preparing applications to renew its consents and wanted to extend unloading to 24 hours a day.
          Read more

  3. Stu

    Fonterra’s strategy is predicated on rail, hence the new railhead at Mosgiel (and adjacent Port Otago presence). Neither Timaru nor Bluff have sufficient rail capacity.

    • Elizabeth

      Need to look at Fonterra’s wider plans, yes tied to rail, not tied to ONE port and ALL large vessel service… examine their (emerging) strategy options for value chain, global markets and customised product development. Prime movers may not have written it down yet…

      Gosh, darn, you might ask one of the POL executives if he thinks POL buying rail wagons is a good idea.

  4. Stu

    Fonterra gets a lot of criticism for a number of things, but their use of rail should be encouraged, I think. Even if goods exit at ports outwith the region, long-haul freight is better for the country as a whole.

    • Elizabeth

      ### ODT Online Sat, 9 Apr 2011
      Seeing for themselves
      By Rebecca Fox
      The independent panel hearing the Port Otago Project Next Generation resource consent applications were shown around the port yesterday.
      Read more

      • Elizabeth

        ### ODT Online Tue, 12 Apr 2011
        Ecological data lacking, critics tell hearing
        By Rebecca Fox
        A lack of good, solid information on the effects of Port Otago’s proposed channel widening or deepening is concerning those who live and fish in, and care for, the area’s environment.
        Read more

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